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CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2014
Library Journal Best Print Reference Selection 2014

With its striking range and penetrating depth, Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World traces the enduring history and broad cultural influence of Neo-Latin, the form of Latin that originated in the Italian Renaissance and persists to the modern era. Featuring original contributions by a host of distinguished international scholars, this 800,000 word two-volume work explores every aspect of the civilized world from literature and law to philosophy and the sciences. An invaluable resource for both the advanced scholar and the graduate student.

The Encyclopaedia is also available ONLINE.

Contributors are: Monica Azzolini, Irena Backus, Jon Balserak, Ann Blair, Jan Bloemendal, David Butterfield, Isabelle Charmantier, John Considine, Alejandro Coroleu, Ricardo da Cunha Lima, Susanna de Beer, Erik De Bom, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Tom Deneire, Ingrid De Smet, Karl Enenkel, Charles Fantazzi, Mathieu Ferrand, Roger Fisher, Philip Ford, Raphaele Garrod, Guido Giglioni, Roger Green, Yasmin Haskell, Hans Helander, Lex Hermans, Louise Hill Curth, Leofranc Holford-Strevens, Brenda Hosington, Erika Jurikova, Craig Kallendorf, Jill Kraye, Andrew Laird, Han Lamers, Marc Laureys, Jeltine Ledegang-Keegstra, Jan Machielsen, Peter Mack, David Marsh, Dustin Mengelkoch, Milena Minkova, David Money, Jennifer Morrish Tunberg, Adam Mosley, Ann Moss, Monique Mund-Dopchie, Colette Nativel, Lodi Nauta, Henk Nellen, Gideon Nisbet, Richard Oosterhoff, Marianne Pade, Jan Papy, David Porter, Johann Ramminger, Jennifer Rampling, Rudolf Rasch, Karen Reeds, Valery Rees, Bettina Reitz-Joosse, Stella Revard, Dirk Sacré, Gerald Sandy, Minna Skafte Jensen, Carl Springer, Gorana Stepanić, Harry Stevenson, Jane Stevenson, Andrew Taylor, Nikolaus Thurn, Johannes Trapman, Terence Tunberg, Piotr Urbański, Wiep van Bunge, Harm-Jan van Dam, Demmy Verbeke, Zweder von Martels, Maia Wellington Gahtan, and Paul White.
CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2014

With its striking range and penetrating depth, Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World traces the enduring history and wide-ranging cultural influence of Neo-Latin, the form of Latin that originated in the Italian Renaissance and persists to the modern era. Featuring original contributions by a host of distinguished international scholars, this comprehensive reference work explores every aspect of the civilized world from literature and law to philosophy and the sciences. An invaluable resource for both the advanced scholar and the graduate student.

The Encyclopaedia is also available in PRINT.

The online edition gives access to a number of newer entries that are not included in the print edition and also includes corrections.

Contributors are: Monica Azzolini, Irena Backus, Patrick Baker, Jon Balserak, Ann Blair, Jan Bloemendal, David Butterfield, Isabelle Charmantier, John Considine, Alejandro Coroleu, Ricardo da Cunha Lima, Susanna de Beer, Erik De Bom, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Tom Deneire, Ingrid De Smet, Karl Enenkel, Charles Fantazzi, Mathieu Ferrand, Roger Fisher, Philip Ford, Raphaele Garrod, Guido Giglioni, Roger Green, Yasmin Haskell, Hans Helander, Lex Hermans, Thomas Herron, Louise Hill Curth, Leofranc Holford-Strevens, Brenda Hosington, Erika Jurikova, Craig Kallendorf, Jill Kraye, Andrew Laird, Han Lamers, Marc Laureys, Jeltine Ledegang-Keegstra, Jan Machielsen, Peter Mack, Eric MacPhail, David Marsh, Dustin Mengelkoch, Milena Minkova, David Money, Jennifer Morrish Tunberg, Adam Mosley, Ann Moss, Monique Mund-Dopchie, Colette Nativel, Lodi Nauta, Henk Nellen, Gideon Nisbet, Philipp Nothaft, Katrina Olds, Richard Oosterhoff, Marianne Pade, Jan Papy, David Porter, Johann Ramminger, Jennifer Rampling, Rudolf Rasch, Karen Reeds, Valery Rees, Bettina Reitz-Joosse, Stella Revard, Dirk Sacre, Gerald Sandy, Minna Skafte Jensen, Carl Springer, Gorana Stepanić, Harry Stevenson, Jane Stevenson, Andrew Taylor, Nikolaus Thurn, Johannes Trapman, Terence Tunberg, Piotr Urbański, Wiep van Bunge, Harm-Jan van Dam, Demmy Verbeke, Zweder von Martels, Maia Wellington Gahtan, and Paul White.
Editor: Efraim Podoksik
Doing Humanities in Nineteenth-Century Germany, edited by Efraim Podoksik, is a collaborative project by leading scholars in German studies that examines the practices of theorising and researching in the humanities as pursued by German thinkers and scholars during the long nineteenth century, and the relevance of those practices for the humanities today.
Each chapter focuses on a particular branch of the humanities, such as philosophy, history, classical philology, theology, or history of art. The volume both offers a broad overview of the history of German humanities and examines an array of particular cases that illustrate their inner dilemmas, ranging from Ranke’s engagement with the world of poetry to Max Weber’s appropriation of the notion of causality.
Forging Dutch and French in the Early Modern Low Countries (1540-1620)
In The Golden Mean of Languages, Alisa van de Haar sheds new light on the debates regarding the form and status of the vernacular in the early modern Low Countries, where both Dutch and French were local tongues. The fascination with the history, grammar, spelling, and vocabulary of Dutch and French has been studied mainly from monolingual perspectives tracing the development towards modern Dutch or French. Van de Haar shows that the discussions on these languages were rooted in multilingual environments, in particular in French schools, Calvinist churches, printing houses, and chambers of rhetoric. The proposals that were formulated there to forge Dutch and French into useful forms were not directed solely at uniformization but were much more diverse.
Vernacular Logic in Renaissance Italy (1540-1551)
Author: Marco Sgarbi
From the twelfth to the seventeenth century, Aristotle’s writings lay at the foundation of Western culture, providing a body of knowledge and a set of analytical tools applicable to all areas of human investigation. Scholars of the Renaissance have emphasized the remarkable longevity and versatility of Aristotelianism, but they have mainly focused on the Latin tradition. Scarce, if any, attention has gone to vernacular works. Nonetheless, several important Renaissance figures wished to make Aristotle’s works accessible and available outside the narrow circle of professional philosophers and university professors to a broad set of readers. The thesis underpinning this book is that Italian vernacular Aristotelianism, especially in the field of logic, made fundamental contributions to the thought of the period, anticipating many of the features of early modern philosophy and contributing to a new conception of knowledge.
Editor: E.P. Bos
In 1962–1967 Professor L.M. de Rijk published his Logica Modernorum – A Contribution to the History of Early Terminist Logic. The first part (1962) has the title: On the Twelfth Century Theories of Fallacy. The second part (two volumes, 1967) has as title: The Origin and the Early Development of the Theory of Supposition. De Rijk’s Logica Modernorum provides the basis for the modern study of medieval theories of supposition.
Now, nearly 50 years later, scholars have made great progress in the study of the properties of terms. De Rijk’s study was primarily about the early development of terminist logic, i.e. during the 12th and 13th centuries. Scholars have also investigated later developments well into the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Not only logical texts, but also texts on grammar have been published. Many of the scholars who have contributed to this development, present papers in this volume.
Contributors are Fabrizio Amerini, Jenny Ashworth, Allan Bäck, Bert Bos, Julie Brumberg-Chaumont, Laurent Cesalli, Lambert Marie de Rijk, Sten Ebbesen, Alessandro Conti, Catarina Dutilh-Novaes, Onno Kneepkens, Costantino Marmo, Dafne Mure, Claude Panaccio, Ernesto Perini Santos, Joel Lonfat, Angel d’Ors, Göran Sundholm and Luisa Valente.
The Questiones libri Porphirii is a commentary on Porphyry's Isagoge by the fourteenth-century logician Thomas Manlevelt. It is edited here in full. Not much is known of Thomas Manlevelt, but his work is remarkable enough. Following in the footsteps of William of Ockham, Manlevelt stresses the individual nature of all things existing in the outside world. He radically challenges our conceptional framework. He applies Ockham's razor in a ruthless manner to do away with all entities not deemed necessary for preservation. In the end, Manlevelt even maintains that substance does not exist. In this text early Ockhamism is being pushed to its extremes.
Forgery and Authenticity in Medievalist Texts and Objects in Nineteenth-Century Europe
In search of specific national traditions nineteenth-century artists and scholars did not shy of manipulating texts and objects or even outright manufacturing them. The essays edited by János M. Bak, Patrick J. Geary and Gábor Klaniczay explore the various artifacts from outright forgeries to fruits of poetic phantasy, while also discussing the volatile notion of authenticity and the multiple claims for it in the age.

Contributors include: Pavlína Rychterová, Péter Dávidházi, Pertti Anttonen, László Szörényi, János M. Bak, Nóra Berend, Benedek Láng, Igor P. Medvedev, Dan D.Y. Shapira, János György Szilágyi, Cristina La Rocca, Giedrė Mickūnaitė, Johan Hegardt and Sándor Radnóti.
Entangled History of Medievalism in Nineteenth-Century Europe
Across the nineteenth century European history, philology, archaeology, art, and architecture turned from a common classical vocabulary and ideology to images of pasts and origins drawn primarily from the Middle Ages. The result was a paradox, as scholars and artists, schooled in the same pan-European vocabularies and methodologies nevertheless sought to discover through them unique and, frequently, oppositional national identities. These essays, edited by Patrick J. Geary and Gábor Klaniczay, focus on this all-European phenomenon with a special focus on Scandinavia and East-Central Europe, bearing witness to the inextricable links between cultural and scientific engagement, the search for national identity, and political agendas in the long nineteenth century that made the search for archaic origins an entangled history.

Contributors include: Walter Pohl, Ian Wood, Sverre Bagge, Maciej Janowski, Sir David Wilson, Anders Andrén, Ernő Marosi, Carmen Popescu, Ahmet Ersoy, Michael Werner, Joep Leerssen, R. Howard Bloch, Pavlína Rychterová, Tommaso di Carpegna Falconieri, Stefan Detchev, Florin Curta, and Péter Langó.
Latin and Vernacular Cultures - Examples of Bilingualism and Multilingualism c. 1300-1800
Author: Jan Bloemendal
Bilingual Europe presents to the reader a Europe that for a long time was ‘multilingual’: besides the vernacular languages Latin played an important role. Even ‘nationalistic’ treatises could be written in Latin. Until deep into the 18th century scientific works were written in it. It is still an official language of the Roman Catholic Church. But why did authors choose for Latin or for their native tongue? In the case of bilingual authors, what made them choose either language, and what implications did that have? What interactions existed between the two?

Contributors include Jan Bloemendal, Wiep van Bunge, H. Floris Cohen, Arjan C. van Dixhoorn, Guillaume van Gemert, Joep T. Leerssen, Ingrid Rowland, Arie Schippers, Eva Del Soldato, Demmy Verbeke, Françoise Waquet, and Ari H. Wesseling†.