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Justinian's Corpus iuris in the Byzantine world
Basilica Online is a fully-searchable online edition of the 17 volumes of the Basilica text and its scholia, as edited between 1945 and 1988 by H.J. Scheltema, D. Holwerda, and N. van der Wal. The Basilica is the single-most important source for Byzantine law throughout the period of the Byzantine empire, and is a major source for Byzantine studies more broadly.

Added Features and Benefits
- Most recent and accurate edition of the Basilica text and its scholia.
- Fully searchable in both Latin and Greek.
- All critical apparatus of the edition included.
- Browsing and navigation functionalities at volume (volumen), book (liber) or chapter (titulus) level.
- Full academic introduction written specifically for the online edition by Professor Dr B. H. Stolte.
- Comprehensive and up-to-date bibliography compiled by Dr T. E. van Bochove.
- Collective index to the text and scholia.

Readership:
Researchers with interests in Byzantine law, Byzantine society, medieval legal history, Roman law and its afterlives, and medieval Greek language.
Volume Editor: Howell A. Lloyd
In The Reception of Bodin an international and interdisciplinary team of seventeen scholars considers one of the most remarkable figures in European intellectual history, the sixteenth-century jurist and philosopher Jean Bodin, as a ‘prismatic agent’ in the transmission of ideas. The subject is approached in the light of reception theory coupled with critical evaluation of key texts as well as features of Bodin’s own career. Bodin is treated as recipient of knowledge gleaned from multifarious sources, and his readers as receivers responding diversely to his work in various contexts and from various standpoints. The volume provides searching insights both into Bodin’s mental world and into processes that served to cross-fertilise European intellectual life from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment.

Contributors include Ann Blair, Harald E. Braun, Glenn Burgess, Peter Burke, Vittor Ivo Comparato, Marie-Dominique Couzinet, Luc Foisneau, Robert von Friedeburg, Mark Greengrass, Virginia Krause, Johannes Machielsen, Christian Martin, Sara Miglietti, Diego Quaglioni, Jonathan Schüz, Michaela Valente.
An Edict for the Caracallan Empire
Author: Alex Imrie
In The Antonine Constitution, Alex Imrie approaches the famous edict of AD 212 from numerous angles, offering an assessment of its rationale that is rooted in the dynamic period of the early third century. Controversial since its discovery, it is depicted here as a keystone in Caracalla’s attempt to revolutionise the public image of the Severan dynasty after murdering his brother.

There is an inherent paradox between the apparently progressive nature of the edict, and the volatile emperor responsible for it. The enigma is only heightened by a dearth of ancient evidence relating to the legislation. By combining literary and material evidence with the surviving papyrological record, Alex Imrie shows that Caracalla’s rationale is best understood in an embedded context.
The four Livres des procurateurs de la nation germanique de l’Université d’Orléans (1444-1602) are a unique source for the history of European universities. The quarterly reports of the presidents of the association of law students allow us to reconstitute in detail the everyday life of students from the Germanic countries during the Renaissance. From the published first and second 'Livres' between 1444-1567 (same authors, Brill 1971 and 1988) it appears that the alumni got key positions in Church and State in their homelands. The reports of the third 'Livre' for the years 1567-1587 describe the fortunes of the German Nation and the University and offer a unique look at the role of Orleans and its graduates in the religious wars and the growing confessionalisation of Europe.
The four Livres des procurateurs de la nation germanique de l’Université d’Orléans (1444-1602) are a unique source for the history of European universities. The quarterly reports of the presidents of the association of law students allow us to reconstitute in detail the everyday life of students from the Germanic countries during the Renaissance. From the published first , second and third Livres between 1444-1587 (same authors, Brill 1971-2013) it appears that the alumni got key positions in Church and State in their homelands. The reports of the fourth Livre for the years 1587-1602 describe the fortunes of the German Nation and the University and offer a unique look at the role of Orleans and its graduates in the religious wars and the growing confessionalisation of Europe.
Nach der Handschrift des Verfassers hrsg. von H. Michelant. Stuttgart 1852. Nachdruck