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CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2014
Library Journal Best Print Reference Selection 2014

With its striking range and penetrating depth, Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World traces the enduring history and broad cultural influence of Neo-Latin, the form of Latin that originated in the Italian Renaissance and persists to the modern era. Featuring original contributions by a host of distinguished international scholars, this 800,000 word two-volume work explores every aspect of the civilized world from literature and law to philosophy and the sciences. An invaluable resource for both the advanced scholar and the graduate student.

The Encyclopaedia is also available ONLINE.

Contributors are: Monica Azzolini, Irena Backus, Jon Balserak, Ann Blair, Jan Bloemendal, David Butterfield, Isabelle Charmantier, John Considine, Alejandro Coroleu, Ricardo da Cunha Lima, Susanna de Beer, Erik De Bom, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Tom Deneire, Ingrid De Smet, Karl Enenkel, Charles Fantazzi, Mathieu Ferrand, Roger Fisher, Philip Ford, Raphaele Garrod, Guido Giglioni, Roger Green, Yasmin Haskell, Hans Helander, Lex Hermans, Louise Hill Curth, Leofranc Holford-Strevens, Brenda Hosington, Erika Jurikova, Craig Kallendorf, Jill Kraye, Andrew Laird, Han Lamers, Marc Laureys, Jeltine Ledegang-Keegstra, Jan Machielsen, Peter Mack, David Marsh, Dustin Mengelkoch, Milena Minkova, David Money, Jennifer Morrish Tunberg, Adam Mosley, Ann Moss, Monique Mund-Dopchie, Colette Nativel, Lodi Nauta, Henk Nellen, Gideon Nisbet, Richard Oosterhoff, Marianne Pade, Jan Papy, David Porter, Johann Ramminger, Jennifer Rampling, Rudolf Rasch, Karen Reeds, Valery Rees, Bettina Reitz-Joosse, Stella Revard, Dirk Sacré, Gerald Sandy, Minna Skafte Jensen, Carl Springer, Gorana Stepanić, Harry Stevenson, Jane Stevenson, Andrew Taylor, Nikolaus Thurn, Johannes Trapman, Terence Tunberg, Piotr Urbański, Wiep van Bunge, Harm-Jan van Dam, Demmy Verbeke, Zweder von Martels, Maia Wellington Gahtan, and Paul White.
CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2014

With its striking range and penetrating depth, Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World traces the enduring history and wide-ranging cultural influence of Neo-Latin, the form of Latin that originated in the Italian Renaissance and persists to the modern era. Featuring original contributions by a host of distinguished international scholars, this comprehensive reference work explores every aspect of the civilized world from literature and law to philosophy and the sciences. An invaluable resource for both the advanced scholar and the graduate student.

The Encyclopaedia is also available in PRINT.

The online edition gives access to a number of newer entries that are not included in the print edition and also includes corrections.

Contributors are: Monica Azzolini, Irena Backus, Patrick Baker, Jon Balserak, Ann Blair, Jan Bloemendal, David Butterfield, Isabelle Charmantier, John Considine, Alejandro Coroleu, Ricardo da Cunha Lima, Susanna de Beer, Erik De Bom, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Tom Deneire, Ingrid De Smet, Karl Enenkel, Charles Fantazzi, Mathieu Ferrand, Roger Fisher, Philip Ford, Raphaele Garrod, Guido Giglioni, Roger Green, Yasmin Haskell, Hans Helander, Lex Hermans, Thomas Herron, Louise Hill Curth, Leofranc Holford-Strevens, Brenda Hosington, Erika Jurikova, Craig Kallendorf, Jill Kraye, Andrew Laird, Han Lamers, Marc Laureys, Jeltine Ledegang-Keegstra, Jan Machielsen, Peter Mack, Eric MacPhail, David Marsh, Dustin Mengelkoch, Milena Minkova, David Money, Jennifer Morrish Tunberg, Adam Mosley, Ann Moss, Monique Mund-Dopchie, Colette Nativel, Lodi Nauta, Henk Nellen, Gideon Nisbet, Philipp Nothaft, Katrina Olds, Richard Oosterhoff, Marianne Pade, Jan Papy, David Porter, Johann Ramminger, Jennifer Rampling, Rudolf Rasch, Karen Reeds, Valery Rees, Bettina Reitz-Joosse, Stella Revard, Dirk Sacre, Gerald Sandy, Minna Skafte Jensen, Carl Springer, Gorana Stepanić, Harry Stevenson, Jane Stevenson, Andrew Taylor, Nikolaus Thurn, Johannes Trapman, Terence Tunberg, Piotr Urbański, Wiep van Bunge, Harm-Jan van Dam, Demmy Verbeke, Zweder von Martels, Maia Wellington Gahtan, and Paul White.
The Evolution of Early Greek Epic Diction in the Light of Oral Theory
Author: Steve Reece
For over 2500 years many of the most learned scholars of the Greek language have concerned themselves with the topic of etymology. The most productive source of difficult, even inexplicable, words was Homer’s 28,000 verses of epic poetry. Steve Reece proposes an approach to elucidating the meanings of some of these difficult words that finds its inspiration primarily in Milman Parry’s oral-formulaic theory. He proposes that during the long period of oral transmission acoustic uncertainties, especially regarding word boundaries, were continually occurring: a bard uttered one collocation of words, but his audience thought it heard another. The consequent resegmentation of words and phrases is the probable cause of some of the etymologically inexplicable words in our Homeric texts.
A Functional Analysis of the Order and Articulation of NP Constituents in Herodotus
The structure of the noun phrase in Ancient Greek is extremely flexible: the various constituents may occur in almost every possible order and each constituent may or may not be preceded by an article. However, the use and function of the various options have received very little attention. This book tries to fill that gap. A functional analysis of the structure of the NP in Herodotus illucidateswhich arguments lead a native speaker in his choice to select one of the various possible NP patterns. The results do not only increase our knowledge of the NP, but also lead to a better interpretation of Ancient Greek texts.
Editors: S.J. Bakker and G.C. Wakker
Central in this volume of the 6th International Colloquium on Ancient Greek Linguistics is the question how cohesion is created in Ancient Greek texts. The contributions to the volume either discuss the various cohesive devices that occur in a specific text or focus on the use and function of a particular cohesion device in a larger corpus. Apart from the use of pronomina and particles, less standard cohesive devices, like the use of tense and the grammatical form of complements, are taken into consideration. The result is a volume that gives a good impression of recent research in the field of Greek linguistics, not only of interest for classical scholars, but also for general linguists interested in discourse coherence cnd cohesion.

Contributors include: Rutger J. Allan, Stéphanie J. Bakker, Louis Basset, Anna Bonifazi, Annemieke Drummen, Marietje (A.M.) van Erp Taalman Kip, Coulter H. George, Luuk Huitink, Sander Orriens, Annemieke van der Plaat, Antonio Revuelta, Albert Rijksbaron and Gerry C. Wakker.
NOW PUBLISHED IN OPEN ACCESS. All articles published in the Journal of Greek Linguistics are available in open access from the date of publication. Special introductory Article Processing Charges apply for publication in this journal. For more information see the Instructions for Authors.
The Journal of Greek Linguistics (JGL) is an established (double-blind) peer-reviewed international journal dedicated to the descriptive and theoretical study of the Greek language from its roots in Ancient Greek down to present-day dialects and varieties, including those spoken in Asia Minor, Cyprus, Tsakonia, and the Greek diaspora. It aims to offer a focused outlet for publication of first-class research in Greek Linguistics, broadly construed.
JGL’s goal is not only to reach linguists interested in the Greek language but also to engage the linguistics community and Hellenists more generally. The input to JGL will thus comprise any topic relevant to Greek linguistics, in the broadest sense, but with some preference given to material with wider relevance to specific subfields within linguistics proper. The intention is therefore on the one hand to encourage discussions and research that illuminate different aspects - theoretical, historical, and descriptive - of general linguistics using Greek data, and on the other hand to offer innovative solutions to problems and issues specific to the description and analysis of the Greek language.
Greek has played a central role in linguistics and the study of language for centuries. JGL will bring the language into a key position in current debate within Linguistics and related fields.
Online submission: Articles for publication in the Journal of Greek Linguistics can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here.

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