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Winner of the 2016 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award

The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is the English translation of Franco Montanari’s Vocabolario della Lingua Greca. With an established reputation as the most important modern dictionary for Ancient Greek, it brings together 140,000 headwords taken from the literature, papyri, inscriptions and other sources of the archaic period up to the 6th Century CE, and occasionally beyond. The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is an invaluable companion for the study of Classics and Ancient Greek, for beginning students and advanced scholars alike.
Translated and edited under the auspices of The Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC, The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is based on the completely revised 3rd Italian edition published in 2013 by Loescher Editore, Torino.
The dictionary is also available as an online resource.

Features
• The principal parts of some 15,000 verbs are listed directly following the entry and its etymology. For each of these forms, the occurrence in the ancient texts has been certified. When found only once, the location is cited.
• Nearly all entries include citations from the texts with careful mention of the source.
• The dictionary is especially rich in personal names re-checked against the sources for the 3rd Italian edition, and in scientific terms, which have been categorized according to discipline.
• Each entry has a clear structure and typography making it easy to navigate.

"For a number of years now, scholars at ease in Italian have benefitted enormously from the riches, layout, concision, and accuracy of Professor Montanari's Vocabolario della Lingua Greca, with its added advantage of the inclusion of names. Hence classicists in general will welcome the English version of this very valuable resource." - Professor Richard Janko, University of Michigan
“Franco Montanari is a giant in our field, and his Dictionary is a major leap forward for us….” - Professor Gregory Nagy, Harvard University
Winner of the 2016 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award

The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is also available as a single volume and online. This luxury edition offers the same high-quality content as the regular edition but is bound in two slimmer volumes with linen stamped covers and comes in a linen-clad box.

The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is the English translation of Franco Montanari’s Vocabolario della Lingua Greca. With an established reputation as the most important modern dictionary for Ancient Greek, it brings together 140,000 headwords taken from the literature, papyri, inscriptions and other sources of the archaic period up to the 6th Century CE, and occasionally beyond. The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is an invaluable companion for the study of Classics and Ancient Greek, for beginning students and advanced scholars alike.
Translated and edited under the auspices of The Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC, The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek is based on the completely revised 3rd Italian edition published in 2013 by Loescher Editore, Torino.

Features:
• The principal parts of some 15,000 verbs are listed directly following the entry and its etymology. For each of these forms, the occurrence in the ancient texts has been certified. When found only once, the location is cited.
• Nearly all entries include citations from the texts with careful mention of the source.
• The dictionary is especially rich in personal names re-checked against the sources for the 3rd Italian edition, and in scientific terms, which have been categorized according to discipline.
• Each entry has a clear structure and typography making it easy to navigate.

"For a number of years now, scholars at ease in Italian have benefitted enormously from the riches, layout, concision, and accuracy of Professor Montanari's Vocabolario della Lingua Greca, with its added advantage of the inclusion of names. Hence classicists in general will welcome the English version of this very valuable resource." - Professor Richard Janko, University of Michigan
“Franco Montanari is a giant in our field, and his Dictionary is a major leap forward for us….” - Professor Gregory Nagy, Harvard University
CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2014
Library Journal Best Print Reference Selection 2014

With its striking range and penetrating depth, Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World traces the enduring history and broad cultural influence of Neo-Latin, the form of Latin that originated in the Italian Renaissance and persists to the modern era. Featuring original contributions by a host of distinguished international scholars, this 800,000 word two-volume work explores every aspect of the civilized world from literature and law to philosophy and the sciences. An invaluable resource for both the advanced scholar and the graduate student.

The Encyclopaedia is also available ONLINE.

Contributors are: Monica Azzolini, Irena Backus, Jon Balserak, Ann Blair, Jan Bloemendal, David Butterfield, Isabelle Charmantier, John Considine, Alejandro Coroleu, Ricardo da Cunha Lima, Susanna de Beer, Erik De Bom, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Tom Deneire, Ingrid De Smet, Karl Enenkel, Charles Fantazzi, Mathieu Ferrand, Roger Fisher, Philip Ford, Raphaele Garrod, Guido Giglioni, Roger Green, Yasmin Haskell, Hans Helander, Lex Hermans, Louise Hill Curth, Leofranc Holford-Strevens, Brenda Hosington, Erika Jurikova, Craig Kallendorf, Jill Kraye, Andrew Laird, Han Lamers, Marc Laureys, Jeltine Ledegang-Keegstra, Jan Machielsen, Peter Mack, David Marsh, Dustin Mengelkoch, Milena Minkova, David Money, Jennifer Morrish Tunberg, Adam Mosley, Ann Moss, Monique Mund-Dopchie, Colette Nativel, Lodi Nauta, Henk Nellen, Gideon Nisbet, Richard Oosterhoff, Marianne Pade, Jan Papy, David Porter, Johann Ramminger, Jennifer Rampling, Rudolf Rasch, Karen Reeds, Valery Rees, Bettina Reitz-Joosse, Stella Revard, Dirk Sacré, Gerald Sandy, Minna Skafte Jensen, Carl Springer, Gorana Stepanić, Harry Stevenson, Jane Stevenson, Andrew Taylor, Nikolaus Thurn, Johannes Trapman, Terence Tunberg, Piotr Urbański, Wiep van Bunge, Harm-Jan van Dam, Demmy Verbeke, Zweder von Martels, Maia Wellington Gahtan, and Paul White.
CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title 2014

With its striking range and penetrating depth, Brill’s Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World traces the enduring history and wide-ranging cultural influence of Neo-Latin, the form of Latin that originated in the Italian Renaissance and persists to the modern era. Featuring original contributions by a host of distinguished international scholars, this comprehensive reference work explores every aspect of the civilized world from literature and law to philosophy and the sciences. An invaluable resource for both the advanced scholar and the graduate student.

The Encyclopaedia is also available in PRINT.

The online edition gives access to a number of newer entries that are not included in the print edition and also includes corrections.

Contributors are: Monica Azzolini, Irena Backus, Patrick Baker, Jon Balserak, Ann Blair, Jan Bloemendal, David Butterfield, Isabelle Charmantier, John Considine, Alejandro Coroleu, Ricardo da Cunha Lima, Susanna de Beer, Erik De Bom, Jeanine De Landtsheer, Tom Deneire, Ingrid De Smet, Karl Enenkel, Charles Fantazzi, Mathieu Ferrand, Roger Fisher, Philip Ford, Raphaele Garrod, Guido Giglioni, Roger Green, Yasmin Haskell, Hans Helander, Lex Hermans, Thomas Herron, Louise Hill Curth, Leofranc Holford-Strevens, Brenda Hosington, Erika Jurikova, Craig Kallendorf, Jill Kraye, Andrew Laird, Han Lamers, Marc Laureys, Jeltine Ledegang-Keegstra, Jan Machielsen, Peter Mack, Eric MacPhail, David Marsh, Dustin Mengelkoch, Milena Minkova, David Money, Jennifer Morrish Tunberg, Adam Mosley, Ann Moss, Monique Mund-Dopchie, Colette Nativel, Lodi Nauta, Henk Nellen, Gideon Nisbet, Philipp Nothaft, Katrina Olds, Richard Oosterhoff, Marianne Pade, Jan Papy, David Porter, Johann Ramminger, Jennifer Rampling, Rudolf Rasch, Karen Reeds, Valery Rees, Bettina Reitz-Joosse, Stella Revard, Dirk Sacre, Gerald Sandy, Minna Skafte Jensen, Carl Springer, Gorana Stepanić, Harry Stevenson, Jane Stevenson, Andrew Taylor, Nikolaus Thurn, Johannes Trapman, Terence Tunberg, Piotr Urbański, Wiep van Bunge, Harm-Jan van Dam, Demmy Verbeke, Zweder von Martels, Maia Wellington Gahtan, and Paul White.
The Evolution of Early Greek Epic Diction in the Light of Oral Theory
Author: Steve Reece
For over 2500 years many of the most learned scholars of the Greek language have concerned themselves with the topic of etymology. The most productive source of difficult, even inexplicable, words was Homer’s 28,000 verses of epic poetry. Steve Reece proposes an approach to elucidating the meanings of some of these difficult words that finds its inspiration primarily in Milman Parry’s oral-formulaic theory. He proposes that during the long period of oral transmission acoustic uncertainties, especially regarding word boundaries, were continually occurring: a bard uttered one collocation of words, but his audience thought it heard another. The consequent resegmentation of words and phrases is the probable cause of some of the etymologically inexplicable words in our Homeric texts.
A Functional Analysis of the Order and Articulation of NP Constituents in Herodotus
The structure of the noun phrase in Ancient Greek is extremely flexible: the various constituents may occur in almost every possible order and each constituent may or may not be preceded by an article. However, the use and function of the various options have received very little attention. This book tries to fill that gap. A functional analysis of the structure of the NP in Herodotus illucidateswhich arguments lead a native speaker in his choice to select one of the various possible NP patterns. The results do not only increase our knowledge of the NP, but also lead to a better interpretation of Ancient Greek texts.
Editors: S.J. Bakker and G.C. Wakker
Central in this volume of the 6th International Colloquium on Ancient Greek Linguistics is the question how cohesion is created in Ancient Greek texts. The contributions to the volume either discuss the various cohesive devices that occur in a specific text or focus on the use and function of a particular cohesion device in a larger corpus. Apart from the use of pronomina and particles, less standard cohesive devices, like the use of tense and the grammatical form of complements, are taken into consideration. The result is a volume that gives a good impression of recent research in the field of Greek linguistics, not only of interest for classical scholars, but also for general linguists interested in discourse coherence cnd cohesion.

Contributors include: Rutger J. Allan, Stéphanie J. Bakker, Louis Basset, Anna Bonifazi, Annemieke Drummen, Marietje (A.M.) van Erp Taalman Kip, Coulter H. George, Luuk Huitink, Sander Orriens, Annemieke van der Plaat, Antonio Revuelta, Albert Rijksbaron and Gerry C. Wakker.
Author: Olga Spevak
The internal ordering of Latin noun phrases is very flexible in comparison with modern European languages. Whereas there are a number of studies devoted to the variable placement of modifiers, The Noun Phrase in Classical Latin Prose proposes an entirely new approach: a discussion of the semantic and syntactic properties of both nouns and modifiers. Using recent insights in general linguistics, it argues that not only pragmatic factors but also semantic factors (whether we are dealing with an inherent property, the author’s assessment, or a further specification of a referent) are responsible for the internal ordering of Latin noun phrases. Additionally, this book discusses prepositional phrases functioning as modifiers, and appositions, which have received little attention in the literature.
In this collective volume edited by Klaas Bentein, Mark Janse, and Jorie Soltic, some of the leading experts in the field explore variation and change in one of the core areas of Ancient Greek grammar: tense, aspect, and modality. The contributors investigate key aspects such as the existence of and competition between linguistic variants, the value of modern linguistic theory for the study of linguistic variation, and the interplay between various dimensions of variation. They focus on various stages of the Greek language (Archaic, Classical, Post-classical, and Byzantine), taking both qualitative and quantitative approaches. By doing so, they offer valuable insights in the multi-faced nature of the Greek verbal system, providing an incentive towards the further study of linguistic variation and change.
Proceedings of the Seventeenth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies (Albacete 2018)
Every third year, the members of the International Association for Neo-Latin Studies (IANLS) assemble for a week-long conference. Over the years, this event has evolved into the largest single conference in the field of Neo-Latin studies. The papers presented at these conferences offer, then, a general overview of the current status of Neo-Latin research; its current trends, popular topics, and methodologies. In 2018, the members of IANLS gathered for a conference in Albacete (Spain) on the theme of “Humanity and Nature: Arts and Sciences in Neo-Latin Literature”. This volume presents the conference’s papers which were submitted after the event and which have undergone a peer-review process. The papers deal with a broad range of fields, including literature, history, philology, and religious studies.