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Approaches to Translation Studies is an international series promoting the scholarly study of translation. The notion of plural ‘approaches’ to translation and its study calls up images of scholarly explorers following untrodden paths to translation, or more cautiously (re)tracing the familiar routes. Either way, it indicates a refusal to be tied to dogma or prejudice, a curiosity about possible new vistas, and an awareness that the observer’s view depends on where s/he comes from. But a recognition of the plurality of possible approaches does not necessarily mean passive acquiescence to relativism and scepticism. The idea of ‘approaching’ translation also implies a sense of purpose and direction.

In the context of today’s globalised and pluralised world, this metaphorically suggested perspective is perhaps more relevant than ever before. The series therefore remains fully committed to it, while trying to respond to the rapid changes of our digital age. Ready to travel between genres, media and technologies, willing to span centuries and continents, and always keeping an open mind about the various oppositions that have too often needlessly divided researchers (e.g. high culture versus popular culture, linguistics versus literary studies versus cultural studies, translation ‘proper’ versus ‘adaptation’), the series Approaches to Translation Studies will continue to accommodate all translation-oriented books that match high-quality scholarship with an equal concern for reader-friendly communication.

Approaches to Translation Studies is open to a wide range of scholarly publications in the field of Translation Studies (monographs, collective volumes…). Dissertations are welcome but will obviously need to be thoroughly adapted to their new function and readership. Conference proceedings and collections of articles will only be considered if they show strong thematic unity and tight editorial control. For practical reasons, the series intends to continue its tradition of publishing English-language research. While students, teachers and scholars in the various schools and branches of Translation Studies make up its primary readership, the series also aims to promote a dialogue with readers and authors from various neighbouring disciplines.

Approaches to Translation Studies was launched in 1970 by James S Holmes (1924-1986), who was also one of the ‘founding fathers’ of Translation Studies as an academic discipline. At later stages the series’ editorship passed into the hands of Raymond van den Broeck, Kitty M. van Leuven-Zwart and Ton Naaijkens. Being the very first international series specifically catering for the needs of the fledgling discipline in the 1970s, Approaches to Translation Studies has played a significant historical role in providing it with a much needed platform as well as giving it greater visibility in the academic marketplace.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Volumes 2, 4, and 5 were published by Van Gorcum (Assen, The Netherlands), but orders should be directed to Brill | Rodopi.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
The electronic version of the series Approaches to Translation Studies..

Approaches to Translation Studies is an international series promoting the scholarly study of translation. The notion of plural ‘approaches’ to translation and its study calls up images of scholarly explorers following untrodden paths to translation, or more cautiously (re)tracing the familiar routes. Either way, it indicates a refusal to be tied to dogma or prejudice, a curiosity about possible new vistas, and an awareness that the observer’s view depends on where s/he comes from. But a recognition of the plurality of possible approaches does not necessarily mean passive acquiescence to relativism and scepticism. The idea of ‘approaching’ translation also implies a sense of purpose and direction.

In the context of today’s globalised and pluralised world, this metaphorically suggested perspective is perhaps more relevant than ever before. The series therefore remains fully committed to it, while trying to respond to the rapid changes of our digital age. Ready to travel between genres, media and technologies, willing to span centuries and continents, and always keeping an open mind about the various oppositions that have too often needlessly divided researchers (e.g. high culture versus popular culture, linguistics versus literary studies versus cultural studies, translation ‘proper’ versus ‘adaptation’), the series Approaches to Translation Studies will continue to accommodate all translation-oriented books that match high-quality scholarship with an equal concern for reader-friendly communication.

Approaches to Translation Studies is open to a wide range of scholarly publications in the field of Translation Studies (monographs, collective volumes…). Dissertations are welcome but will obviously need to be thoroughly adapted to their new function and readership. Conference proceedings and collections of articles will only be considered if they show strong thematic unity and tight editorial control. For practical reasons, the series intends to continue its tradition of publishing English-language research. While students, teachers and scholars in the various schools and branches of Translation Studies make up its primary readership, the series also aims to promote a dialogue with readers and authors from various neighbouring disciplines.

Approaches to Translation Studies was launched in 1970 by James S Holmes (1924-1986), who was also one of the ‘founding fathers’ of Translation Studies as an academic discipline. At later stages the series’ editorship passed into the hands of Raymond van den Broeck, Kitty M. van Leuven-Zwart and Ton Naaijkens. Being the very first international series specifically catering for the needs of the fledgling discipline in the 1970s, Approaches to Translation Studies has played a significant historical role in providing it with a much needed platform as well as giving it greater visibility in the academic marketplace.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Volumes 2, 4, and 5 were published by Van Gorcum (Assen, The Netherlands), but orders should be directed to Brill | Rodopi.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Chinese Utopian Fiction at the End of Empire, 1902–1910
In Hundred Days’ Literature, Lorenzo Andolfatto explores the landscape of early modern Chinese fiction through the lens of the utopian novel, casting new light on some of its most peculiar yet often overshadowed literary specimens. The wutuobang or lixiang xiaoshuo, by virtue of its ideally totalizing perspective, provides a one-of-a-kind critical tool for the understanding of late imperial China’s fragmented Zeitgeist. Building upon rigorous close reading and solid theoretical foundations, Hundred Days’ Literature offers the reader a transcultural critical itinerary that links Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward to Wu Jianren’s Xin Shitou ji via the writings of Liang Qichao, Chen Tianhua, Bihe Guanzhuren, and Lu Shi’e. The book also includes the first English translation of Cai Yuanpei’s short story “New Year’s Dream.”
In the post-war mid-century Robert van Gulik produced a series of stories set in Imperial China and featuring a Chinese Judge: Judge Dee. This book examines the author’s unprecedented effort in hybridising two heterogenous crime writing traditions – traditional Chinese gong’an (court-case) fiction and its Anglo-American counterpart – bringing to light how his fiction draws elements from these two traditions for plots, narrative features, visual images, and gender representation.

Relying on research on various sources and literary traditions, it provides illumination of the historical contexts, centring on the cultural interaction and connectedness that occurred during the multidirectional global flows of the Judge Dee texts in both western and Chinese markets. This study contributes to current scholarship on crime fiction by questioning its predominantly Eurocentric focus and the divisive post-colonial approach often adopted in accessing works concerning foreign peoples and cultures.
DQR Studies in Literature is a longstanding book series for state-of-the-art research in the field of English-language literature(s.) The series welcomes high-quality investigations which deepen, renew or revise traditional approaches, and encourages studies which advance fresh frameworks. In addition to covering the field of Anglophone literature(s) in its historical, cultural, national and ethnic complexity, the series offers a platform to emerging approaches which place the literary text in a meaningful relation to the widest possible range of contexts, methodologies and fields of enquiry.
Transdisciplinary cross-overs may include but are not limited to cultural analysis, cultural studies, gender studies and queer theory, cognitive studies, social sciences, empirical analysis, medical humanities, network theory, sound studies, mobility studies and ecocriticism.

We recently opened a sister series: DQR Studies in the Lyric, which offers a platform for an international exchange of innovative methodologies and theoretical advances in the study of poetry and poetics.

All submissions are subject to a double blind peer review process prior to publication.

DQR Studies in Literature is a book series which first began in 1986 as an offshoot of the journal, Dutch Quarterly Review of Anglo-American Letters that flourished from 1971 until 1992.
Since its inception we focus on themed volumes in this series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn

Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.
The electronic version of DQR Studies in Literature .

DQR Studies in Literature is a longstanding book series for state-of-the-art research in the field of English-language literature(s.) The series welcomes high-quality investigations which deepen, renew or revise traditional approaches, and encourages studies which advance fresh frameworks. In addition to covering the field of Anglophone literature(s) in its historical, cultural, national and ethnic complexity, the series offers a platform to emerging approaches which place the literary text in a meaningful relation to the widest possible range of contexts, methodologies and fields of enquiry.
Transdisciplinary cross-overs may include but are not limited to cultural analysis, cultural studies, gender studies and queer theory, cognitive studies, social sciences, empirical analysis, medical humanities, network theory, sound studies, mobility studies and ecocriticism.

We recently opened a sister series: DQR Studies in the Lyric, which offers a platform for an international exchange of innovative methodologies and theoretical advances in the study of poetry and poetics.

All submissions are subject to a double blind peer review process prior to publication.

DQR Studies in Literature is a book series which first began in 1986 as an offshoot of the journal, Dutch Quarterly Review of Anglo-American Letters that flourished from 1971 until 1992.
Since its inception we focus on themed volumes in this series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.
Transnational Perspectives, Translation Processes, Scandinavian and Postcolonial Challenges
Examining the cultural dynamics of translation and transfer, Cultural Transfer Reconsideredproposes new insights into both epistemological and analytical questions raised in the research area of cultural transfer. Seeking to emphasize the creative processes of transfer, Steen Bille Jørgensen and Hans-Jürgen Lüsebrink have invited specialized researchers to determine the role of structures and agents in the dynamics of cultural encounters. With its particular focus on the North, as opposed to the South, the volume problematizes national paradigms. Presenting various aspects of tri- and multilateral transfers involving Scandinavian countries, Cultural Transfer Reconsidered opens perspectives regarding the ways in which textual, intertextual and artistic practices, in particular, pave the way for postcolonial interrelatedness.

Contributors: Miriam Lay Brander, Petra Broomans, Michel Espagne, Karin Hoff, Steen Bille Jørgensen, Anne-Estelle Leguy, Hans-Jürgen Lüsebrink, Walter Moser, Magnus Qvistgaard, Anna Sandberg, Udo Schöning, Wiebke Röben de Alencar Xavier
The Journal of World Literature (JWL) aspires to bring together scholars interested in developing the concept of World Literature, and to provide the most suitable environment for contributions from all the world’s literary traditions. It creates a forum for re-visiting global literary heritages, discovering valuable works that have been undeservedly ignored, and introducing aspects of the transnational global dissemination of literature, with translation as a focus. The journal welcomes submissions that can concurrently imagine any literary tradition, in any language, moving beyond national frames to simultaneously discuss and develop the cosmopolitan threads of a variety of literary traditions. It also welcomes contributions from scholars of different research backgrounds working collaboratively as well as from group research projects interested in showcasing their findings, in order to meet the challenge of a wider and deeper discussion of literature’s networks.

The editorial board of the JWL warmly welcomes submissions for open-call issues.

Peer Review Policy: All articles published in Journal of World Literature undergo a double-blind peer review process. This includes articles published in special issues.
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Volume Editor:
Shakespeare as German Author, edited by John McCarthy, revisits in particular the formative phase of German Shakespeare reception 1760-1830. Following a detailed introduction to the historical and theoretical parameters of an era in search of its own literary voice, six case studies examine Shakespeare’s catalytic role in reshaping German aesthetics and stage production. They illuminate what German speakers found so appealing (or off-putting) about Shakespeare’s spirit, consider how translating it nurtured new linguistic and aesthetic sensibilities, and reflect on its relationship to German Geist through translation and cultural transfer theory. In the process, they shed new light, e.g., on the rise of Hamlet to canonical status, the role of women translators, and why Titus Andronicus proved so influential in twentieth-century theater performance.

Contributors are: Lisa Beesley, Astrid Dröse, Johanna Hörnig, Till Kinzel, John A. McCarthy, Curtis L. Maughan, Monika Nenon, Christine Nilsson.
Volume Editors: and
The essays in Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century straddle the disciplines of Joyce studies, translation studies, and translation theory. The newest scholarly developments in these fields are well reflected in recent retranslations of Joyce’s works into Italian, Portuguese, French, Hungarian, Dutch, Turkish, German, South Slavic, and many other languages. Joyce critics and Joyce translators offer multi-angled critical attention to the issues of translation and retranslation, enhanced by their diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds and innovative methodologies. Because retranslations of Joyce have also exerted significant influence on target language cultures, students and readers of Joyce and, more broadly, of modernist and world literature, will find this book highly relevant to their appreciation of literature in translation.