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DQR Studies in Literature is a longstanding book series for state-of-the-art research in the field of English-language literature(s.) The series welcomes high-quality investigations which deepen, renew or revise traditional approaches, and encourages studies which advance fresh frameworks. In addition to covering the field of Anglophone literature(s) in its historical, cultural, national and ethnic complexity, the series offers a platform to emerging approaches which place the literary text in a meaningful relation to the widest possible range of contexts, methodologies and fields of enquiry.
Transdisciplinary cross-overs may include but are not limited to cultural analysis, cultural studies, gender studies and queer theory, cognitive studies, social sciences, empirical analysis, medical humanities, network theory, sound studies, mobility studies and ecocriticism.

We recently opened a sister series: DQR Studies in the Lyric, which offers a platform for an international exchange of innovative methodologies and theoretical advances in the study of poetry and poetics.

All submissions are subject to a double blind peer review process prior to publication.

DQR Studies in Literature is a book series which first began in 1986 as an offshoot of the journal, Dutch Quarterly Review of Anglo-American Letters that flourished from 1971 until 1992.
Since its inception we focus on themed volumes in this series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn

Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.
The electronic version of DQR Studies in Literature .

DQR Studies in Literature is a longstanding book series for state-of-the-art research in the field of English-language literature(s.) The series welcomes high-quality investigations which deepen, renew or revise traditional approaches, and encourages studies which advance fresh frameworks. In addition to covering the field of Anglophone literature(s) in its historical, cultural, national and ethnic complexity, the series offers a platform to emerging approaches which place the literary text in a meaningful relation to the widest possible range of contexts, methodologies and fields of enquiry.
Transdisciplinary cross-overs may include but are not limited to cultural analysis, cultural studies, gender studies and queer theory, cognitive studies, social sciences, empirical analysis, medical humanities, network theory, sound studies, mobility studies and ecocriticism.

We recently opened a sister series: DQR Studies in the Lyric, which offers a platform for an international exchange of innovative methodologies and theoretical advances in the study of poetry and poetics.

All submissions are subject to a double blind peer review process prior to publication.

DQR Studies in Literature is a book series which first began in 1986 as an offshoot of the journal, Dutch Quarterly Review of Anglo-American Letters that flourished from 1971 until 1992.
Since its inception we focus on themed volumes in this series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.
Transnational Perspectives, Translation Processes, Scandinavian and Postcolonial Challenges
Examining the cultural dynamics of translation and transfer, Cultural Transfer Reconsideredproposes new insights into both epistemological and analytical questions raised in the research area of cultural transfer. Seeking to emphasize the creative processes of transfer, Steen Bille Jørgensen and Hans-Jürgen Lüsebrink have invited specialized researchers to determine the role of structures and agents in the dynamics of cultural encounters. With its particular focus on the North, as opposed to the South, the volume problematizes national paradigms. Presenting various aspects of tri- and multilateral transfers involving Scandinavian countries, Cultural Transfer Reconsidered opens perspectives regarding the ways in which textual, intertextual and artistic practices, in particular, pave the way for postcolonial interrelatedness.

Contributors: Miriam Lay Brander, Petra Broomans, Michel Espagne, Karin Hoff, Steen Bille Jørgensen, Anne-Estelle Leguy, Hans-Jürgen Lüsebrink, Walter Moser, Magnus Qvistgaard, Anna Sandberg, Udo Schöning, Wiebke Röben de Alencar Xavier
Volume Editors: and
The essays in Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century straddle the disciplines of Joyce studies, translation studies, and translation theory. The newest scholarly developments in these fields are well reflected in recent retranslations of Joyce’s works into Italian, Portuguese, French, Hungarian, Dutch, Turkish, German, South Slavic, and many other languages. Joyce critics and Joyce translators offer multi-angled critical attention to the issues of translation and retranslation, enhanced by their diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds and innovative methodologies. Because retranslations of Joyce have also exerted significant influence on target language cultures, students and readers of Joyce and, more broadly, of modernist and world literature, will find this book highly relevant to their appreciation of literature in translation.
Temporal and Geographical Dynamics of Theorization
Volume Editors: and
In The Situatedness of Translation Studies, Luc van Doorslaer and Ton Naaijkens critically reassess some outdated views about Translation Studies, and demonstrate that translation theory is far more diverse than its usual representation as a Western scholarly tradition arising from the 1970s onwards. They present ten chapters about lesser-known conceptualizations of translation and translation theory in various cultural contexts, such as Chinese, Estonian, Greek, Russian and Ukrainian. This book shows that so-called ‘modern’ arguments about translation practice encompassing much more than a linguistic phenomenon, can, in fact, be dated back and connected to several precursors, such as semiotics or transfer theory. In doing so, it theorizes and localizes discussions about perceptions of translation and Translation Studies as a discipline.

Contributors: Yves Gambier, Iryna Odrekhivska, Elin Sütiste & Silvi Salupere, Shaul Levin, Feng Cui, Natalia Kamovnikova, Anastasia Shakhova, George Floros & Simos Grammenidis, Anne Lange, Luc van Doorslaer & Ton Naaijkens.
This is the first complete study of the relationship between Retranslation and Reception. Although many translation scholars have cited Reception Theory in their work, this is the first systematic study of its relationship to Retranslation. The book starts from the hypothesis that frequent retranslations of the same literary text into the same language may be indicative of its impact in the target culture. The volume encompasses both theory and practical analysis of Retranslation and Reception as mutually dependent concepts. The sixteen chapters relate the translations analysed to their socio-historical contexts in order to assess the impact that they have had on the target culture in terms of the reception of the authors studied, and also explore the relationship that may exist between the appearance of new translations and historical, social or cultural changes.
Volter Kilpi in Orbit Beyond (Un)translatability
One of the hottest battles emerging out of the theoretical and methodological collisions between Comparative Literature and Translation Studies—especially on the battleground of World Literature—has to do with translatability and untranslatability. Is any translation of a great work of literature not only a lamentable betrayal but an impossibility? Or is translation an imperfect but invaluable tool for the transmission of works and ideas beyond language barriers?
Both views are defensible; indeed both are arguably commonsensical. What Douglas Robinson argues in Translating the Monster, however, is that both are gross oversimplifications of a complex situation that he calls on Jacques Derrida to characterize as “the monster.”
The Finnish novelist Robinson takes as his case study for that monstrous rethinking is Volter Kilpi (1874-1939), regarded by scholars of Finnish literature as Finland’s second world-class writer—the first being Aleksis Kivi (1834-1872). Kilpi’s modernist experiments of the 1930s, especially his so-called Archipelago series, beginning with his masterpiece, In the Alastalo Parlor (1933), were forgotten and neglected for a half century, due to the extreme difficulty of his narrative style: he reinvents the Finnish language, to the extent that many Finns say it is like reading a foreign language (and one contemporary critic called it the “Mesopotamian language … of a half-wit”). That novel has been translated exactly twice, into Swedish and German. Translating the Monster also gives the English-speaking reader an extended taste of the novel in English—en route to a series of reframings of the novel as allegories of translation and world literature.
Volume Editors: and
What is the role of literature in our global landscape today? How do local authors respond to the growing worldwide power of English and the persisting effects of the colonial systems that paved the way for globalization today? These questions have often been approached very differently by postcolonialists and by students of world literature, but over the past two decades, a developing dialogue between these divergent approaches has produced robust scholarship and sometimes fractious debate, as issues of language, politics, and cultural difference have come to the fore. Drawing on a wide variety of cases, from medieval Wales to contemporary Syria and Australia, and on works written in Arabic, Basque, English, Hindi, and more, this collection explores the mutual illumination that can be gained through the interaction of postcolonial and world literary perspectives.
Thinking with Stephanos Stephanides
Volume Editor:
The book captures key moments in the critical and creative dialogue of literary scholars, poets and artists with poet, author, documentary film-maker and literary scholar Stephanos Stephanides. Employing a polyphonic and cross-disciplinary perspective, the twenty-three essays and creative pieces flow together in cycles of continuities and discontinuities, emulating Stephanides’s fluid and transgressive universe. Drawing on the broad topic of borders and crossings, Shifting Horizons and Crossing Borders offers critical material on themes such as space and place, dislocation and migration, journeys and bridges, movement and fluidity, the aesthetics and the politics of the sea, time, nostalgia and (trans)cultural memory, identity and poetics, translation and translatability, home and homecoming. An invaluable reference for anyone interested in the crosscurrents between the poetic, the cultural and the political.
Textxet welcomes the submission of monographs and edited collections of articles that fall within the broad category of Comparative Literature: theories of literature, world literature, works dealing with various literatures, and comparisons between the arts.
Only submissions in English will be considered.
All manuscripts considered suitable will undergo a double peer review process before acceptation.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals for manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn and Iulia Ivana.

Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.