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This volume deals with the encounter of Early Christianity with Hellenistic culture, particularly with the question of ancient rhetorical influence on the First Letter of Clement. It contains reprints of two classical studies by A. von Harnack and W. Jaeger, which were seminal for the understanding the letter against a Hellenistic background, furthermore it makes an important essay of the Dutch scholar W.C. van Unnik on the literary and rhetorical genre of First Clement ( genos symbouleutikon) for the first time available in English. The editors also present two new studies: Breytenbach describes the Hellenistic background of Clement's use of metaphorical language and Welborn questions the traditional dating of First Clement on the basis of an analysis of the rhetorical situation.
This series is no longer published by Brill

Die Echtheit der dritten Arianerrede steht seit einiger Zeit zur Debate. Der Verfasser versucht zu zeigen, dass kein Anlass besteht, an der Echtheit zu zweifeln, und benutzt diese Rede als Bezugsrahmen zur Darstellung der theologischen Gedankenwelt des Athanasius. Den in Migne abgedruckten Text verwendend bietet er eine Übersetzung und einen Kommentar, meistens zu jedem Satz, sonst zu Abschnitten. Die Studie schliesst mit einer kurzen Betrachtung zur theologischen Bedeutung der von Athanasius immer wieder vollzogenen Unterscheidung zwischen der Erzeugung und der Erschaffung.
Author: Meijering
Kapitel 1-25. Einleitung, Übersetzung, Kommentar.

In diese Reihe: Teil II (ISBN 978-90-50-63367-3) und Teil III (ISBN 978-90-50-63488-5).
Author: Meijering
Kapitel 26 - 58. Übersetzung und Kommentar

In diese Reihe: Teil I (ISBN 978-90-50-63187-7) und Teil III (ISBN 978-90-50-63488-5).
Author: Meijering
Kapitel 59 - 67. Fbersetzung, Kommentar, theologiegeschichtlicher Ausblick

In diese Reihe: Teil I (ISBN 978-90-50-63187-7) und Teil II (ISBN 978-90-50-63367-3).
Editor: Hörner
A common accusation made against Origen is that he dissolves history into intellectual abstraction and that his eschatology (if this is recognized at all) is notoriously obscure. In this new work, the author draws on an impressive range of bibliography to consider Origen’s Philosophy of History and Eschatology in the widest context of facts, documents and streams of thought, including Classical and Late Antiquity Greek Philosophy, Gnosticism, Hebraism and Patristic Thought, both before Origen and well after his death. Against claims that he causes history to evaporate into barren idealism, his thought is shown to be firmly grounded on his particular vision of historical occurences. Confronting assertions that Origen has no eschatological ideas, his eschatology is shown rather to have made a distinctive mark throughout his works, both explicitly and tacitly.
In Origen’s view, history was the foundation of scriptural interpretation, a teleological process determined by factors and functions such as providence – prophecy – promise – expectation – realization – anticipation – faith – anticipation – hope – awaiting for – fulfilment – end. Since 1986, the author has argued for the unpopular thesis that Origen is, in many respects, an anti-Platonist. Nevertheless, the author casts light upon the Aristotelian rationale of Origen’s doctrine of apokatastasis, arguing that its validity is bolstered by ontological rather than historical premises. The extent of Origen’s influence upon what is currently regarded as ‘orthodoxy’ turns out to be far wider and more profound than has hitherto been acknowledged.

A Commentary on Letter 52 to Nepotian, with Introduction, Text, and Translation
Author: Andrew Cain
In Jerome and the Monastic Clergy, Andrew Cain provides the first full-scale commentary on the famous Letter to Nepotian, in which Jerome articulates his radical plan for imposing a strict ascetic code of conduct on the contemporary clergy. Cain comprehensively addresses stylistic, literary, historical, text-critical and other issues of interpretive interest. Accompanying the commentary is an introduction which situates the Letter in the broader context of its author’s life and work and exposes its fundamental propagandistic dimensions. The revised critical Latin text and the new facing-page translation will make the Letter more accessible than ever before and will provide a reliable textual apparatus for future scholarship on this key writing by one of the most prolific authors in Latin antiquity.
A Thinker in the Jewish Diaspora
Philo (20BCE?-45CE?) is the most illustrious son of Alexandrian Jewry and the first major scholar to combine a deep Jewish learning with Greek philosophy. His unique allegorical exegesis of the Greek Bible was to have a profound influence on the early fathers of the Church. Philo was, above all, a philosopher, but he was also intensely practical in his defence of the Jewish faith and law in general, and that of Alexandria’s embattled Jewish community in particular. A famous example was his leadership of a perilous mission to plead the community’s cause to Emperor Caligula. This monograph provides a guide to Philo's life, his thought and his action, as well as his continuing influence on theological and philosophical thought.
Authors: Albert Geljon and D.T. Runia
The Jewish exegete and philosopher Philo of Alexandria has long been famous for his allegorical treatises on the Greek Bible. The present volume contains the first translation and commentary in English on his treatise De agricultura ( On cultivation), which gives an elaborate allegorical interpretation of Genesis 9:20. Noah’s role as a cultivator is analysed in terms of the ethical and spiritual quest of the soul making progress towards its goal. The translation renders Philo’s baroque Greek into readable modern English. The commentary pays particular attention to the treatise’s structure, its biblical basis and its exegetical and philosophical contents. The volume will be valuable for the insights it gives into an unusual but highly influential method of biblical interpretation.