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In the post-Enlightenment world, philosophy and religion have come to occupy different, even opposed, domains. But how were they related before this? What were the commonalities and dissimilarities between them? Did they already contain the seeds of their later division – or do they still share enough in common to allow meaningful conversation between them?

This new Brill series “Ancient Philosophy & Religion” provides an interdisciplinary platform for monographs, edited volumes and commentaries on this issue. It is edited by two leading scholars in the fields it brings together, George Boys-Stones (Ancient Philosophy) and George van Kooten (New Testament Studies), and is supported by an editorial board whose members are known for their work in the area. It invites scholars of ancient philosophy, Classics, early Judaism, ancient Judaism, New Testament & early Christianity, and all other relevant fields, to showcase their research on ancient philosophy and religion and to contribute to the debate.

The series’ subject matter is symbolized by its icon, used by courtesy and permission of the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. It represents a dialogue between philosophers, as shown on one of the reliefs of the funeral sacrificial table (mensa) from the “House of Proclus” on the Southern slope of the Acropolis at Athens, excavated in 1955. Dating from 350-325 BC, the reliefs of the mensa depict, after the lamentation and the farewell, the posthumous encounter of the deceased with the philosophers (1950 NAM 90).

The editors very much welcome proposals for monographs, edited volumes and even commentaries on relevant texts.

Aristotle's Metaphysics

Annotated Bibliography of the Twentieth-Century Literature

Series:

Roberto Radice and Richard Davies

The authors collaborated with 50 scholars from around the world to produce an exhaustive annotated bibliography on the central work of the Aristotelian corpus. It brings together signed descriptions of more than 3200 books and articles, as well as several thousand reviews and notes, originally published in English, Italian, German, French, Spanish and Russian. Descriptions are fully cross-referenced to one another. The first [Italian] edition (Vita e Pensiero, Milan 1996) has been thoroughly revised, corrected and updated, and is complemented by an index of the most important loci Aristotelici.

Series:

Panayiotis Tzamalikos

A common accusation made against Origen is that he dissolves history into intellectual abstraction and that his eschatology (if this is recognized at all) is notoriously obscure. In this new work, the author draws on an impressive range of bibliography to consider Origen’s Philosophy of History and Eschatology in the widest context of facts, documents and streams of thought, including Classical and Late Antiquity Greek Philosophy, Gnosticism, Hebraism and Patristic Thought, both before Origen and well after his death. Against claims that he causes history to evaporate into barren idealism, his thought is shown to be firmly grounded on his particular vision of historical occurences. Confronting assertions that Origen has no eschatological ideas, his eschatology is shown rather to have made a distinctive mark throughout his works, both explicitly and tacitly.
In Origen’s view, history was the foundation of scriptural interpretation, a teleological process determined by factors and functions such as providence – prophecy – promise – expectation – realization – anticipation – faith – anticipation – hope – awaiting for – fulfilment – end. Since 1986, the author has argued for the unpopular thesis that Origen is, in many respects, an anti-Platonist. Nevertheless, the author casts light upon the Aristotelian rationale of Origen’s doctrine of apokatastasis, arguing that its validity is bolstered by ontological rather than historical premises. The extent of Origen’s influence upon what is currently regarded as ‘orthodoxy’ turns out to be far wider and more profound than has hitherto been acknowledged.

Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World

Essays in Honour of John D. Turner

Series:

Edited by Kevin Corrigan and Tuomas Rasimus

This Festschrift honors the life and work of John D. Turner (Charles J. Mach University Professor of Classics and History at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln) on the occasion of his 75th birthday. Professor Turner’s work has been of profound importance for the study of the interaction between Greek philosophy and Gnosticism in late antiquity. This volume contains essays by international scholars on a broad range of topics that deal with Sethian, Valentinian and other early Christian thought, as well as with Platonism and Neoplatonism, and offer a variety of perspectives spanning intellectual history, Greek and Coptic philology, and the study of religions.

Herrscherideal und Herrschaftskritik bei Philo von Alexandria

Eine Untersuchung am Beispiel seiner Josephsdarstellung in De Josepho und De somniis II

Series:

Friederike Oertelt

Die in der Arbeit vorgenomme Auslegung der Schriften De Josepho und De Somniis II von Philo von Alexandria liest die beiden gegensätzlichen Darstellungen der Josephfigur als Beitrag zum Herrschaftsdiskurs. Die ambivalenten Tendenzen der biblischen Josephfigur bilden für ihn den Ausgangspunkt am Beispiel Josephs, Strukturen sowohl tyrannischer als auch idealer Herrschaft zu untersuchen. Philos Kenntnis griechisch-hellenistischer Philosophie sowie sein Verständnis der Tora als göttlich inspiriertem Text ermöglicht ihm, den politischen Charakter auf unterschiedlichen Ebenen zu reflektieren. Die Spannung zwischen beiden Traktaten bleibt dabei bestehen und kann als bewusste Darstellung gelungener und tyrannischer Herrschaft gedeutet werden. Zugleich entwickelt Philo aus den Ambivalenzen der Josephfigur heraus ein Herrschaftskonzept, welches aufgrund des Toraverständnisses politisches Handeln aus Abhängigkeiten befreit und universale Handlungsvorgaben und Kontrollinstanzen aufzeigt.

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The exegesis of De Josepho and De Somniis II intended in this work read the two portrayals of Joseph as Philo’s contribution to the discourse on government. The ambivalent tendencies in the Joseph figure form the point of departure for Philo in using it for examining structures of tyrannical and ideal rule. Philo’s knowledge of Greek-Hellenistic philosophy and his understanding of the Torah enables him to reflect upon the political character on different levels. Thus the tension between both treatises can be interpreted as a conscious portrayal of effective and of tyrannical rule. At the same time Philo develops a concept of government out of the ambivalences of the Joseph figure, which, on the basis of the understanding of the Torah, liberates political action from dependencies and points out universal guidelines for action and the authorities responsible for control of them.

Edited by Douwe (David) Runia

Brill's Annotated Bibliographies is a series offering a new set of bibliographical tools in the Classics. We welcome proposals for volumes in this series. The bibliographies would be up to 500 pp. in length and in English. Each volume should provide an exhaustive survey of the authoritative text editions, commentaries, translations, concordances, surveys and electronics tools, important or influential items of the secondary literature (indicating their position and impact in current debate). They should fill a need for scholars active in other (not necessarily adjacent) fields who require a quick and reliable access to the literature of the theme of the bibliography and would be of use to university teachers in preparing customised bibliographies for their students. Ideally, the bibliographies should also call attention to important Italian, German or French works, which are often overlooked by English-speaking students and even scholars.

The contents of most bibliographies will be as follows:
- a general introduction, outlining where possible the development of scholarship on the theme
- the bare facts: title, author, year of publication, type of work (article, book, etc.), size, publisher
- some description of the contents of the work
- an evaluation (in a minority of cases)
- a subject index (cf. Brisson's Plato bibliography in Lustrum)

The Soul and its Instrumental Body

A Reinterpretation of Aristotle's Philosophy of Living Nature

Series:

A.P. Bos

For more than 1800 years it has been supposed that Aristotle viewed the soul as the entelechy of the visible body which is 'equipped with organs'. This book argues that in actual fact he saw the soul as the entelechy of a natural body 'that serves as its instrument'. This correction puts paid to W. Jaeger's hypothesis of a three-phase development in Aristotle. The author of this book defends the unity of Aristotle's philosophy of living nature in De anima, in the biological treatises, and in the lost dialogues. Aristotle should therefore be regarded as the author of the notion of the 'vehicle of the soul' and of a 'non-Platonic' dualism. The current understanding of his influence on Hellenistic philosophy needs to change accordingly.

Series:

Amos Edelheit

An unfamiliar portrait of Renaissance Florence is depicted in this volume where we find not only some celebrated humanist-oriented thinkers but also their scholastic friends and rivals, discussing matters pertaining to moral psychology. The rationale here is to illuminate the shadowlands of Renaissance philosophy and the intellectual history of late 15th-century Italy by bringing into focus the important role played by scholastic thinkers in the Italian Renaissance. Questions and problems regarding e.g. the intellect and the will, evil and conscience, cognition and love are treated through detailed accounts of debates and texts which were rarely discussed previously.

Series:

Marguerite Deslauriers

This book argues that Aristotle offers us a consistent theory of definition, according to which a particular type of definition – one which states the formal cause of a simple item – is fundamental. It begins by considering definitions as indemonstrable first principles in demonstrations, and inquires how such definitions can have the certainty required by that role. Later chapters look to the Metaphysics to understand how the unity of definitions guarantees their certainty, and to the Topics to discover why definitions must be formulated in terms of the genus and differentia(e) of the object defined. This work contributes to our understanding of the connection between the function of definition in demonstration and its character as a statement of essence.

Aristotle on Memory and Recollection

Text, Translation, Interpretation, and Reception in Western Scholasticism

Series:

David Bloch

Twentieth-century Scholarship on Aristotle's De Memoria et Reminiscentia was dominated by the view that Aristotle's theories of memory and recollection are basically very similar to ours. By means of a new critical edition of the Greek text, an essay on Aristotle's own theories and an essay on these theories as they were received in the Latin West, the present book offers material that challenges the opinio communis. The result is a new interpretation of Aristotle's De Memoria et Reminiscentia and its relevance to the concerns of 21st-century philosophers, both regarding the concepts of memory and recollection and regarding Aristotle's philosophical methodology.