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Volume Editor: Donald Prudlo
Inquisitions of heresy have long fascinated both specialists and non-specialists. A Companion to Heresy Inquisitions presents a synthesis of the immense amount of scholarship generated about these institutions in recent years. The volume offers an overview of many of the most significant areas of heresy inquisitions, both medieval and early modern. The essays in this collection are intended to introduce the reader to disagreements and advances in the field, as well as providing a navigational aid to the wide variety of recent discoveries and controversies in studies of heresy inquisitions.

Contributors: Christine Ames, Feberico Barbierato, Elena Bonora, Lúcia Helena Costigan, Michael Frassetto, Henry Ansgar Kelly, Helen Rawlings, Lucy Sackville, Werner Thomas, and Robin Vose
Corpses and Proofs in Early Modern European Medicine
Volume Editor: Francesco Paolo de Ceglia
When, why and how was it first believed that the corpse could reveal ‘signs’ useful for understanding the causes of death and eventually identifying those responsible for it? The Body of Evidence. Corpses and Proofs in Early Modern European Medicine, edited by Francesco Paolo de Ceglia, shows how in the late Middle Ages the dead body, which had previously rarely been questioned, became a specific object of investigation by doctors, philosophers, theologians and jurists. The volume sheds new light on the elements of continuity, but also on the effort made to liberate the semantization of the corpse from what were, broadly speaking, necromantic practices, which would eventually merge into forensic medicine.
Volume Editor: Jörg Tellkamp
This Companion aims to give an up-to-date overview of the historical context and the conceptual framework of Spanish imperial expansion during the early modern period, mostly during the 16th century. It intends to offer a nuanced and balanced account of the complexities of this historically controversial period analyzing first its historical underpinnings, then shedding light on the normative language behind imperial theorizing and finally discussing issues that arose with the experience of the conquest of American polities, such as colonialism, slavery or utopia. The aim of this volume is to uncover the structural and normative elements of the theological, legal and philosophical arguments about Spanish imperial ambitions in the early modern period.
Contributors are Manuel Herrero Sánchez, José Luis Egío, Christiane Birr, Miguel Anxo Pena González, Tamar Herzog, Merio Scattola, Virpi Mäkinen, Wim Decock, Christian Schäfer, Francisco Castilla Urbano, Daniel Schwartz, Felipe Castañeda, José Luis Ramos Gorostiza, Luis Perdices de Blas, Beatriz Fernández Herrero.
Theory and Practice of a Burgeoning Concept in the Netherlands
The essays in this volume explore the theories and practices of sovereignty in the context of state-building in the early modern Northern and Southern Low Countries. The Dutch Revolt, the secession of the northern provinces from the Spanish empire, the formation of the Dutch Republic and the reconstitution of Habsburg authority in the south, fostered tense debates among scholars and political leaders about the legitimacy, organisation and processes of law and governance. This made the Low Countries a prime battlefield for theoretical and political contestations about the nature of public authority and the relations between different layers of government in early-modern Europe. The book approaches this historical debate from three angles: (1) political theoretical, (2) legal, and (3) politico-historical.

Contributors are: Hans Blom, Bram De Ridder, Alicia Esteban Estríngana, Simon Groenveld, Gustaaf Janssens, Shavana Musa, José Javier Ruiz Ibáñez, Werner Thomas, Lies van Aelst, Gustaaf van Nifterik, and René Vermeir.
Equity in Early Modern Legal Scholarship takes the reader through the vast amount of legal writings on equity that were published in continental Europe in early modern times. The book offers the first comprehensive overview of the development of the legal concept of equity through the sixteenth and seventeenth century. During this time, equity scholarship broke with its medieval past and entered a lively debate on the nature and function of the concept. Lorenzo Maniscalco links these developments to the early modern identification of equity with Aristotelian epieikeia, a conceptual shift that brought down the barrier that divided theological and legal writings on equity and led to its development as a tool for the interpretation and amendment of legal rules.
Studies in Medieval Legal History in Honour of Paul Brand
The essays in this volume in honour of Paul Brand, Senior Research Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, match his career and interests in the world of legal history as well as medieval social and economic history and textual studies. The topics explored include the Angevin reforms, legal literature, the legal profession and judiciary, land law, the relation between the crown and the Jews, the interaction of the Common Law with Canon and Civil Law, as well as procedural and testamentary procedures, the management of both ecclesiastical and lay estates and the afterlife of medieval learning. Like Brand’s own work, all the essays are grounded on detailed studies of primary sources. The result is a high quality scholarly book that will be of interest and use to medieval scholars, students and non-specialists with wide-ranging and varied interests.
Contributors include Sir John H. Baker*, David Carpenter, David Crook, Charles Donahue, Jr, Barbara Harvey, Richard H. Helmholz, John Hudson, Paul Hyams, David J. Ibbetson, Susanne Jenks, Janet S. Loengard, Alexandra Nicol, Bruce R. O'Brien, Robert C. Palmer, Sandra Raban, Jonathan Rose, Henry Summerson and Sarah Tullis.

*Professor Jon Baker is the winner of the American Society for Legal History’s 2013 Sutherland Prize. The prize, which is awarded annually, is for the best article on English legal history published in the previous year. The Prize was awarded to John baker for his article “Deeds Speak Louder Than Words: Covenants and the Law of Proof, 1290-1321" in Laws, Lawyers and Texts: Studies in Medieval Legal History in Honour of Paul Brand, ed. Susanne Jenks, Jonathan Rose and Christopher Whittick (2012). For more information about the Prize see: http://aslh.net/about-aslh/honors-awards-and-fellowships/sutherland-prize/
Volume Editors: Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz and Stuart Jenks
The Hanse, an organization of towns and traders in medieval and early modern Europe,
was a unique phenomenon. At the same time, it was embedded in the northern European urban and mercantile culture. The contributions in this volume therefore seek to highlight the atypical features of the Hanse, and place them in a wider context of common roots, influences and parallel developments. New research is presented on the origin and growth of the Hanse, the organization of trade, legal history, interaction with non-Hansards and transitions in the Hanse in the early modern period. Moreover, the historiography of the Hanse, problems of source criticism and possibilities for future research are discussed. The volume is an inspiring guide to Hanse studies.
Contributors are Carsten Jahnke, Edda Frankot, Sofia Gustafsson, James M. Murray, Mike Burkhardt, Marie-Louise Pelus-Kaplan, Stuart Jenks, and Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz.
In this work, the third volume of essays dealing with many understudied aspects of the Hundred Years War, American, British, and European scholars deal with the varied sources that reveal the lives of soldiers in the conflict as well as the development of strategy and generalship in the many theaters of the war. The authors also focus on real heroes and villains of the conflict as well as the war’s impact on regions as scattered as Wales, the Low Countries, Italy, Scotland and Spain.
Contributors are Adrian Bell, Anne Curry, Adam Chapman, Andy King, David Simpkin, Christopher Candy, Donald Kagay, William Caferro, David Hoornstra, Elena Odio, Daniel Franke, David Green, Philip Morgan, Sean McGlynn, Wendy Turner, Andrew Villalon, Aleksandra Pfau, Kelly DeVries, and Sergio Boffa.

Winner of the 2014 Verbruggen Prize of De Re Militari (the Society for the Study of Medieval Military History) given annually for the best book on medieval military history.
Author: Brigide Schwarz
Amongst the oldest universities that of the Roman curia is the Great Unkown; little is known of the university of Rome (and of Avignon till 1378). To compensate the loss of sources materials mainly from the Vatican were intensively analysed and a prosopography of the dons and students (694 biograms in annex) drawn up. Some results: all three were legal universities of the southern type. The curial university was itinerant, it was continued at the general councils. Only when the curia resided there untroubled, the local schools of Rome (and Avignon) became great, international universities and different forms of association with the curial university were tried on. Rome was sought after by students from all over Europe for study of legal theory whereas praxis was learned at the papal court. Another attraction of Rome were the possibilities of attaining higher academic grades without much ceremony (first in theology, later also in law).
New Views on Medieval Constitutionalism
Volume Editor: Richard Kaeuper
How law is made, how governance works, and the response of the governed remain crucial modern questions whose roots in many parts of the world reach deep into the past of medieval England. Scholars have long discussed these issues and new perspectives regularly emerge. This volume brings together contemporary views from leaders in the field and from younger scholars, both historians and literary critics. Classic themes and incidents are creatively revisited and new avenues of approach are suggested.