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Author: M. Cappelletti
This volume is a rare combination of interdisciplinary contributions from academia and legal practitioners about accessing justice in developing countries and one ex-colonizing country. The examples from Britain, Burundi, Ghana, Tanzania, South Africa and Sudan point out the need to recognize that each culture has its own sense of rule of law and access to justice. In contrast to the many works which concentrate on structures and norms, this edited volume highlights the importance of the perceptions of the litigants and the court personnel for improving access to justice. Non-lawyer support personnel as shown in the examples in the book are key figures in the processes of access to justice. Hence, the book makes an important contribution to identifying basic elements that are overlooked in judicial reform schemes. The training of non-lawyer support personnel should be given priority over or at least the same priority as the training of lawyers.
Author: Maria A. Gwynn
In Adapting Watercourse Agreements to Developments in International Law: The Case of the Itaipu Treaty Maria A. Gwynn offers an account of the need to align watercourses agreements to the current standards and principles of international law, thereby increasing prospects for achieving sustainable development. As a case study, the author focuses on the most important hydroelectrical energy treaty in the South American region and astutely explores its implementation together with states’ practices regarding the non-navigational uses of watercourses and their commitments to environmental protection. The analysis offers a unique opportunity to assess the value of the UN Watercourses Convention in recommending states adapt their agreements to the provisions of the convention promoting equitable and reasonable uses of watercourses; an interest not only for the treaty partners but also for river basin states and the international community as a whole.
In Addressing Corruption Allegations in International Arbitration, Brody K. Greenwald and Jennifer A. Ivers provide a comprehensive overview of the key issues that arise in international arbitrations involving allegations of corruption by drawing upon their significant experience in these high-stakes cases, including in the only two reported investment treaty cases dismissed specifically as a result of corruption. Their monograph is a valuable resource that analyzes, among other things, the public policy against corruption, the requirements for establishing corruption, issues relating to the burden and standard of proof, how corruption has been proved in practice, and the legal consequences where corruption is established. Mr. Greenwald and Ms. Ivers also assess issues that arise where a sovereign State raises an arbitration defense based on alleged corruption, but does not prosecute the alleged wrongdoers in its domestic courts.
From having been a legal discipline with a predominantly national perspective, administrative law has increasingly become influenced and affected by the general trends of globalization in modern society. Globalization in general and Europeanization in particular have resulted in a multitude of economic and social contacts across borders, within and between commercial and personal, as well as public and private spheres. Globalization has thus led to a need to find new and adapted administrative law solutions. This changed legal landscape for administrative law is a reality that nearly all lawyers active within the field of administrative law have to relate to in their work.

In this book we have gathered a number of prominent scholars who analyze the developments of administrative law from their respective perspective. The papers were first presented at a colloquium at the Faculty of Law at Uppsala University in March 2012. The aim of the colloquium was to increase our own understanding of the processes of globalization within administrative law and to learn from each other. By publishing the papers, we hope that the knowledge gained there can be passed on to a wider group of interested scholars and practicing lawyers.

The contributions to this book are divided into three parts; Governance and procedures, Administrative law within and beyond Europe and Theoretical approaches. The book opens with a paper by Lena Marcusson, Professor of Administrative Law, Uppsala University, which also served as the introduction to the colloquium in 2012.
In Germany, as elsewhere, couples and individuals suffering from unwanted childlessness have two principal means to overcome it. One, adoption, has existed and has been quite heavily regulated in Germany for centuries. The other, assisted reproduction, has only recently come into its own with advances in medical technology and has not yet been comprehensively dealt with by the German legislature.
This monograph provides a survey of adoption and assisted reproduction as alternative (non-coital) ways of establishing parent-child relationships in Germany.

Other titles published in this series:
- Economic Consequences of Divorce in Korea, Hyunjin Kim; isbn 9789004323711
- Assisted Reproduction in Israel; Law, Religion and Culture, Avishalom Westreich; isbn 9789004346062
- Feminicides of Girl Children in the Family Context; An International Human Rights Law Approach, Clara Chapdelaine-Feliciati; isbn 9789004330870
Contribution to Pollution Prevention of Transboundary Water Resources
Author: Komlan Sangbana
In African Basin Management Organizations - Contribution to Pollution Prevention of Transboundary Water Resources, Komlan Sangbana highlights how the protection of water resources and their ecosystems has become a key focus of basin organizations in Africa. The development, adoption and implementation of pollution control standards by basin organizations have widened the remit and greatly strengthened the role of these institutions. As such, basin organizations have become central actors in the domain of African regional law for the protection of freshwater resources. This monograph analyses the variety of functions and tasks that have been entrusted to African basin organizations to prevent pollution damage and provides some avenues for strengthening the work they perform to protect river systems.
The African Journal of Legal Studies (AJLS) is a peer-reviewed and interdisciplinary academic journal focusing on human rights and rule of law issues in Africa as analyzed by lawyers, economists, political scientists and others drawn from throughout the continent and the world. The journal, which was established by the Africa Law Institute and is now co-published in collaboration with Brill | Nijhoff, aims to serve as the leading forum for the thoughtful and scholarly engagement of a broad range of complex issues at the intersection of law, public policy and social change in Africa.

AJLS places emphasis on presenting a diversity of perspectives on fundamental, long-term, systemic problems of human rights and governance, as well as emerging issues, and possible solutions to them. Towards this end, AJLS encourages critical reflections that are based on empirical observations and experience as well as theoretical and multi-disciplinary approaches.

It is hoped that articles appearing in the journal will influence public policy in Africa by providing original, useful and timely critiques of legislation, judicial decisions, law reform and other domestic and foreign policy measures that impact on the daily lives of ordinary Africans. In addition to articles, the journal welcomes reports on recent human rights and governance-related conferences, workshops and seminars as well as books for review and lists of recent publications.

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Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only periodical devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole. Through the scholarly analysis of international legal issues of particular relevance to the African continent, it also contributes to a better acceptance of, and respect for the rule of law in intra-African relations, and for the principles of international law in general. Its uniqueness however goes beyond this, for through its special themes and general articles, it has succeeded over the years to serve as an intellectual forum where the application of international law, and its observance in intra-African relations, are viewed as being integral to Africa’s own economic and political development.
Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent.
The Yearbook also provides ready access to the basic documents of African international organizations by regularly publishing the resolutions and decisions of regional and sub-regional organizations as well as the conventions, protocols and declarations adopted by pan-African agencies.
Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only periodical devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole. Through the scholarly analysis of international legal issues of particular relevance to the African continent, it also contributes to a better acceptance of, and respect for the rule of law in intra-African relations, and for the principles of international law in general. Its uniqueness however goes beyond this, for through its special themes and general articles, it has succeeded over the years to serve as an intellectual forum where the application of international law, and its observance in intra-African relations, are viewed as being integral to Africa’s own economic and political development.
Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent.
The Yearbook also provides ready access to the basic documents of African international organizations by regularly publishing the resolutions and decisions of regional and sub-regional organizations as well as the conventions, protocols and declarations adopted by pan-African agencies.