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Author: M. Piamenta
Author: M. Piamenta
This publication is a most comprehensive, richly-documented dictionary which presents, in local Arabic dialects and in mostly assimilated Judaeo-Yemeni dialects, the natural, geo-political, economic, and socio-cultural history of Muslim Yemen. It is also an account of the religious inter- and intra-socio-cultural and economic everyday life of the ancient Jewish communities who lived as dhimmīs under Muslim rule until their mass emigration to Israel in 1948, leaving behind 5,000 co-religionists.
The dictionary is based on about 300 printed and ms sources painstakingly consulted in various libraries all over the world, and many Yemeni language informants now residing in Israel. The text of every single item is adduced, mostly in context, with reference to ms., or book, page, line, or note, and to classical and foreign etymologies. Particular attention has been paid to the dictionaries of Lane and Dozy.
This is a milestone in Arabic lexicography, complementing Dozy's Supplément aux dictionnaires arabes, and opening up a complete new area sorely missing in the field of Arabic Studies.
Author: Lau
Author: Stetkevych
Foremost among the poetic accomplishments of the "Abbasid age was the sudden flowering of a highly rhetorical and strikingly modern style of poetry , termed "badī'." It found its most radical and controversial exponent in the celebrated panegyrist to the courts of al-Ma'mūn and al-Mu'tasim, Abū Tammām Habīb ibn Aws Al- Tā'ī.
The present study offers a reevaluation of the Arabic literary dispute over Abū Tammām and badī'. It then proposes a redefinition of his diwan and of his major anthology, the Hamāsah, as a metapoesis that served to decode the poetic tradition of the pre-Islamic desert for the Islamic 'Abasid caliph and his urbane and urban courtiers and subjects, and conversely, to encode contemporary Arab-Islamic political experiences in classical form.
This book is extensively illustrated with original translations.
Foremost among the poetic accomplishments of the ʿAbbāsid age was the sudden flowering of a highly rhetorical and strikingly modern style of poetry, termed " badīʿ." It found its most radical and controversial exponent in the celebrated panegyrist to the courts of al-Maʾmūn and al-Muʿtaṣim, Abū Tammām Ḥabīb ibn Aws al-Ṭāʾī.
The present study offers a reevaluation of the Arabic literary dispute over Abū Tammām and badīʿ. It then proposes a redefinition of his diwan and of his major anthology, the Ḥamāsah, as a metapoesis that served to decode the poetic tradition of the pre-Islamic desert for the Islamic ʿAbbāsid caliph and his urbane and urban courtiers and subjects, and conversely, to encode contemporary Arab-Islamic political experiences in classical form.
This book is extensively illustrated with original translations.
Author: Hamzaoui
Uncovering Latent Content in the Fiction of S.Y. Agnon
Author: Nitza Ben-Dov
Shmuel Yosef Agnon (1888-1970), winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1966 and the undisputed master of the Hebrew novel, still remains largely an unknown or even misunderstood figure. Agnon's innovation was to construct an intricate dialectic between Hebrew tradition and the modern predicament, thereby producing a very distinctive mode of modernist narrative. Agnon deployed a technique of rich allusiveness drawn from traditional Hebrew lore and language using free-association, especially by means of imaginative dream-sequences designed to unveil the ambivalent but fateful meanings in the apparently inconsequential events and thoughts which determine the lives of his characters.
This book explores the methods and materials of Agnon's art so as to provide the English reader with insight into his unique fictional world, and it proposes a fresh approach to the reading of Agnon which will also be of interest to those familiar with his work and the crucial literature on it.
Arabic morphology is of continuing importance to students of Arabic. The Marāḥ al-Arwāḥ was written by the Baghdadi grammarian Aḥmad B. ‘Al¦ B. Mas‘ūd of the 8th century A.H., and is one of the very few books in this field that is published relating to this period. The work focuses on the strong verb, the infinitive noun and on their nine subordinates: the perfect, the imperfect, the imperative, the prohibition, the active participle, the passive participle and the nouns of time, place and instrument. It consists of four main parts, the Arabic edition, the translation, the commentary and the introduction. The writer does not only analyze the morphological structure of the word, but he also explains the reasons contributing to the determined measure, and he conforms them to the general principles that were already established in the Arabic inheritance.
The study that emerges is an interesting integration of rationality into morphology. It also gives an insight into many of the thoughts of well-known Arabic and European grammarians.
Author: James Monroe
Although the Arabic maqāmah, a branch of the picaresque genre, was much cultivated in the Middle Ages, little is known about it aside from the works of al-Hamadhānī and al-ḥarīrī, its first two cultivators. This translation of the Maqāmāt al-luzūmīyah by the twelfth-century Andalusi
author al-Saraqustī makes available to Western scholars of narrative prose a hitherto little-known but important collection of Arabic maqāmāt.
The "Preliminary Study" places this specific collection in the context of the overall maqama genre, it further places that genre in the contexts both of Arabic and of world literature, exploring the differences between the picaresque genre and the modern novel. It discusses the meaning of the work, shows the way in which it is original within its genre, and
establishes its organic unity. Finally, it shows that late and post-classical Arabic literary works such as that of al-Saraqustī, which were composed during the so-called "period of decadence," are not decadent at all, contrary to the opinion prevalent among scholars in the field.