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The informal sector is a vital sustainer of the African economy, employing more than 60% of sub-Saharan Africans. The book examines diverse segments of the informal sector, putting into consideration their structure, dynamics, resilience and gender issues. Chapters are based on empirical research on women in the transport sector, vehicle maintenance artisanship, graduates in the informal sector, COVID 19, and the informal economy. Other chapters focus on the indigenous usury finance system, coconut oil production, herbal medicine, and the gig economy across countries including Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana, Togo, and Burkina Faso.
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Using a Canadian case study, this book demonstrates that Dutch immigrant farmers have a global competitive advantage. It also deals with the implications, both beneficial and harmful, of positive stereotyping, in this case the reputation of the Dutch as successful farmers. Farming in a Global Economy consists of three parts. The first provides an overview of farming and migration in the Netherlands and Ontario. Part two deals with Dutch farmers in Ontario from a historical and a sociological perspective, telling the story of postwar farm immigrants, much of it in their own words. The last part covers the Dutch presence in, and impact on, Ontario agriculture.
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Part One of this book examines the social-state, neoliberal, catalytic-state, and democratic-cosmopolitan models of globalisation. Each necessarily tends to function in a manner contradicting essential claims made by its leading advocates. This “immanent contradiction” provides a theoretical warrant for moving to a new position, addressing the shortcomings of the previous framework. The first three chapters of Part Two are devoted to a Marxian model of capitalist globalisation, in which the irresolvable contradictions and social antagonisms of the capitalist global order are explicitly recognised. The final chapter is devoted to a Marxian model of socialist globalisation, in which those contradictions and antagonisms are overcome, bringing the systematic dialectic of globalisation to a close.
International Colloquium on the Centenary of David Ben-Gurion
Democracy and Modernity presents a colloquium of scholars on the present state of democracy in many parts of the globe, in both developed and developing countries. Where does it stand firm, and where is it on shifting ground? What are the conditions necessary for the consolidation of democracy, and what difficulties face those countries where a stable democratic regime is still a hope for the future? How do the political traditions of a country's past affect its ability to maintain democracy in the present?
Recent changes in the nature of regimes in many previously non-democratic countries have made these questions all the more timely. The example of other countries that have made the shift from non-democratic or pre-democratic to democratic regimes in the recent past will surely prove relevant to those encountering a similar complex of problems today.
Contributions to the volume include those of Seymour Martin Lipset, on conditions of the democratic order and social change; Ralf Dahrendorf, on the European experience; Shlomo Avineri, responding to Lipset and Dahrendorf; Shlomo Ben Ami, on Southern Europe; Carlo Rossetti, on the rule of law; Luis Roniger, on the consolidation of democracy in Southern Europe and Latin America; Myron Weiner, On India; Erik Cohen, on Thailand; Ben-Ami Shillony, on the political tradition of Japan; Naomi Chazan, on Africa; and Metin Heper, on the Turkish case. The Introduction and Concluding Remarks by S.N. Eisenstadt set the individual presentations within the time-frame of global developments since World War II and within the comprehensive context of the political culture of the modern state.
Editors-in-Chief: and
As of 2021, Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth is no longer published as a journal but continues as a book series.

Taking a global perspective, Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth (RPGY) addresses specific issues related to the impact of expanding interdependency of national societies on youth conditions. At a time when youth has undergone tremendous changes in most of the countries in the world (Western, Eastern, Southern and Northern), this publication provides academics, practitioners and policy makers worldwide with exhaustive analyses and syntheses regarding youth in a global context as well as the renewed approaches needed to assess these shifts.

Young people both are affected by and are the actors of the globalization of everyday life. Mobility (travel, migration, education), multicultural backgrounds, relations to educational and job markets, demands for leisure recognition, transformation of families and of childhood and youth, and the proliferation and development of youth cultures are among the changing factors that Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth investigates on macro, meso and micro levels.

Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth welcomes proposals coming from the wide range of the human and social sciences (to include sociology, anthropology, demography, economics, psychology, linguistics, political science, history, etc.).

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.
Series Editors: and
Taking a global perspective, Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth (RPGYS) addresses specific issues related to the impact of expanding interdependency of national societies on youth conditions. At a time when youth has undergone tremendous changes in most of the countries in the world (Western, Eastern, Southern and Northern), this publication provides academics, practitioners and policy makers worldwide with exhaustive analyses and syntheses regarding youth in a global context as well as the renewed approaches needed to assess these shifts.

Young people both are affected by and are the actors of the globalization of everyday life. Mobility (travel, migration, education), multicultural backgrounds, relations to educational and job markets, demands for leisure recognition, transformation of families and of childhood and youth, and the proliferation and development of youth cultures are among the changing factors that Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth investigates on macro, meso and micro levels.

Brill Research Perspectives in Global Youth welcomes proposals coming from the wide range of the human and social sciences (to include sociology, anthropology, demography, economics, psychology, linguistics, political science, history, etc.).

Each installment is a focused monograph of approximately 30,000-40,000 words (70-100 pages) presenting the state of the art on a specific theme in close combination with critical analysis and research.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Simona Casadio.
Geopolitical Logics of Chinese, American, and Russian Assistance
What motivates states to assist other countries in need? Focusing on Chinese, Russian, and American decisions about COVID-19 aid, this book illuminates the role of historically contingent ideas in donors’ decisions. Drawing on the theoretical insights of the critical geopolitics tradition, it advances and tests explanations for aid-related decisions on a novel global dataset of COVID-19 aid. Rigorously theorized, meticulously researched, and accessibly written, this book illuminates the ways in which China and Russia seek to reshape the humanitarian field consistent with their geopolitical visions. Their competition with the US over approaches to aid has weakened the integrity of humanitarian system.