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The Africa Yearbook Online is part of African Research Online.

The Africa Yearbook covers major domestic political developments, the foreign policy and socio-economic trends in sub-Sahara Africa – all related to developments in one calendar year. The Yearbook contains articles on all sub-Saharan states, each of the four sub-regions (West, Central, Eastern, Southern Africa) focusing on major cross-border developments and subregional organizations as well as one article on continental developments and one on European-African relations. While the articles have thorough academic quality, the Yearbook is mainly oriented to the requirements of a large range of target groups: students, politicians, diplomats, administrators, journalists, teachers, practitioners in the field of development aid as well as business people.

The Africa Yearbook Online offers access to all yearbooks and is automatically updated upon publication of the new yearbook.

The Africa Yearbook is an indispensable reference work for scholars, journalists, diplomats and (non)governmental organizations.

Features and Benefits
- Easy navigation through the different sub-region(s) by year
- Articles per country from the best scholars in the field
- Each article includes domestic politics, foreign affairs, socioeconomic developments
- Includes general articles about international relations
- Articles include the general facts and figures per country
- Direct links within the articles to country level
- Main keywords are represented in bold for easy navigation and reading
- Annual update upon publication of the new yearbook (Volume 1 of the Africa Yearbook was published in 2005)
- Annual update with African Studies Companion

The Africa Yearbook is also available in print, for more information visit Africa Yearbook.
The journal presents a scholarly account of studies of individuals and societies in Africa and Asia. Its scope is to publish original research by social scientists in the area of anthropology, sociology, history, political science and related social sciences about African and Asian societies and cultures and their relationships.

The journal focuses on problems and possibilities, past and future. Where possible, comparisons are made between countries and continents. Articles should be based on original research and can be co-authored.
From 1966 to 2001 African and Asian Studies was published under the name of Journal of African and Asian Studies.
The Clarivate Analytics Journal Citations Report for 2019 ranks African and Asian Studies with an Impact Factor of 0.167.

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This product gives access to both Africa Yearbook Online and African Studies Companion Online.

Africa Yearbook Online is the online version of the Africa Yearbook.
The African Studies Companion Online is an invaluable tool for scholars in African Studies containing over 1800 entries.
In this series Brill publishes monographs that illuminate issues of social change, broadly understood, in Africa south of the Sahara. Coherently edited volumes may also be considered. Brill invites original, empirical, work that makes an essential conceptual contribution to its field, and has a particular interest in work by younger scholars. Brill welcomes proposals from every branch of the social sciences and humanities that also appeal to a non-specialist audience. Studies of source materials for African history, African linguistics, and religion in Africa each have their own series and will not be included in this series. Wherever appropriate, authors are invited to suggest African publishers with whom their work might be published in partnership with Brill.
The African Studies Companion Online is part of African Research Online.

This new edition of the African Studies Companion Online brings together a wide range of sources of information in the African studies field. It builds on four previous editions of the African Studies Companion, the award-winning publication initiated by Hans Zell. Published in print and online until 2006, this new edition is published electronically only.

The African Studies Companion Online is an invaluable tool for scholars in African Studies. It contains over 1800 entries covering guides and resources for African languages, Africa cartography and maps, African film, African studies journals, magazines and newsletters, media guides and news sources for Africa, the African press, African studies library collections worldwide, national archives in Africa, centers of African studies and African studies programs worldwide, awards and prizes in African studies, and a wealth of other subjects.

Many entries describe and evaluate resources, others are factual and provide practical information. With a few exceptions, all entries directly link to the internet.

Easy to search and navigate, African Studies Companion Online is the best starting point for students and professionals in African Studies.

Edited by Marie-José Wijntjes
Series Editor: Angela Schottenhammer
Edited by Angela Schottenhammer, Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium

This series focuses on the manifold commercial, human, political-diplomatic and scientific interactions that took place across the continental (overland) and maritime Silk Routes. This includes exchanges of ideas, knowledge, religions, and the transfer of cultural traditions, including forms of migration. Geographically speaking the series covers networks (or routes) across the Eurasian continent, the broader Indian Ocean (from East Asia as far as Africa), and the Asia-Pacific world, that is, trans-Pacific connections from Asia to the American continent. A special interest lies in the history of science and technology and knowledge transfer along and across these routes.
The series focuses particularly on historical topics but contemporary studies are also welcome.
Intellectual Responses of Muslims of Northern Nigeria to British Colonial Rule
Author: Muhammad Umar
This volume analyzes discourses on British colonialism constructed by Muslims of northern Nigeria c. 1903-1945. It departs from the conventional wisdom on British colonial policy of indirect rule and its “benign” consequences. Conceptualizing colonialism not simply as a unilateral imposition but as a dynamic encounter between colonizer and colonized, the book shifts the focus away from the overwhelming impact of the former and devastating consequences on the later, thereby revealing indeterminate outcomes and unintended consequences of both the actions of the colonizer and the reactions of the colonized. The volume analyzes legal treatises, poems, and novels, connecting authors to their intellectual backgrounds, relations to colonial regime and intended audiences, leading to better understanding of the ideas that informed Muslims’ intellectual and practical responses to colonialism.
The Arabic script in Africa contains sixteen papers on the past and present use of Arabic script to write African languages. These writing traditions, which are sometimes collectively referred to as Ajami, are discussed for single or multiple languages, with examples from all major linguistic phyla of Africa but one (Khoisan), and from all geographic areas of Africa (North, West, Central, East, and South Africa), as well as a paper on the Ajami heritage in the Americas. The papers analyze (ethno-) historical, literary, (socio-) linguistic, and in particular grammatological aspects of these previously understudied writing traditions and exemplify their range and scope, providing new data for the comparative study of writing systems, literacy in Africa, and the history of (Islam in) Africa.
Three-Terminal Cultural Corridor in the Western Indian Ocean (1799-1856)
Winner of the Society for Arabian Studies Grant in 2003. This study examines a view '‘from outside’ of the three terminals: Makran, Muscat and Zanzibar which is a partial one in the history of the western Indian Ocean. Such themes are, however, essential when viewed against the background of Anglo-French rivalry in the Gulf and Indian Ocean during the first half of the nineteenth century, and are central to numerous debates. The methodological perspective, therefore, whilst concerned with oriental figures and events, is still largely based on sources in western languages precisely because it concentrates on the relations between Saʾ īd bin Sulṭān Āl Bū Saʾ īdī (r. 1806-1856), the Arab-Omani sovereign of Muscat and Zanzibar, and Europe, and on Baluch presence in Oman and in East Africa.
Morocco, Gibraltar and Great Britain in the 18th and 19th Centuries
The Strait of Gibraltar is a ubiquitous symbol of the supposed dividing line between Europe and the Muslim world. This book re-evaluates that perception with reference to new archival evidence about the links between the Gharb region of Morocco and Gibraltar and the establishment of the Moroccan consulate there, focusing on the period around 1750-1850. It shows the development of a complex set of political, social and economic relationships across the strait that connected Morocco to Gibraltar and beyond. In the light of this evidence, the book challenges prevailing arguments that emphasise the isolationist impulses of the Moroccan sultanate and Moroccan society, and highlights the extent to which European expansion in this period was shaped by local responses.