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Race, Culture, and the Education of African American Adults. Second Edition
This book fills a void in the scholarly treatment of Alain Locke by providing the reader with a comprehensive view of Locke’s vision of mass, and adult, education as instruments for social change. It is representative of the remarkable optimistic manifesto of 1925 in which the “New Negro,” by virtue of a cosmopolitan education emphasizing value pluralism, would become a full participant in American culture. This text delineates Locke’s crucial contribution to the philosophy of adult education and provides insights into how he expected others to use his aesthetic, literary, and anthropological theories as instruments for social and political transformation.
Subjectivity and Social Structure in New Confucian Philosophy
The Horizon of Modernity provides an extensive account of New Confucian philosophy that cuts through the boundaries between history and thought. This study explores Mou Zongsan's and Tang Junyi's critical confrontation with Marxism and Communism in relation to their engagement with Western thinkers such as Kant and Hegel. The author analyzes central conceptual aporias in the works of Mou, Tang, as well as Xiong Shili in the context of the revival of Confucianism in contemporary China and the emergence of the discipline of philosophy in twentieth-century Chinese intellectual history. This book casts new light on the nexus between the categories of subjectivity and social structure and the relation between philosophy, modern temporality, and the structural conditions of the modern world.
Volume Editors: Dino Piovan and Giovanni Giorgini
The first ever guide to the reception of classical Athenian democracy, Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Athenian Democracy delivers a fresh and wide-ranging analysis of the uses and reinterpretations of ancient Greek democracy from the late Middle Ages to the XXI century. The book’s first section explores this history from the rediscovery of classical antiquity in the Renaissance in different countries (England, France, Germany, Italy, American Republic) and ages, while the second section focuses on philosophical movements such as Marxism and on contemporary philosophers such as Leo Strauss, Hannah Arendt and Michel Foucault; the last section examines the reception from the perspective of current political science.
The book offers a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach to this important topic by bringing together internationally recognised scholars from a variety of disciplines, including ancient and modern historians, historians of political thought, political philosophers, and political scientists.
Translation, Edition, and Introduction
Georges Sorel’s Study on Vico is a revelatory document of the depths and stakes of French social thought at the end of the 19th century. What brought Sorel to the 18th century Neapolitan theorist of history? Acute awareness of the limitations of Marxist thought in his day, a profound concern with the material underpinnings of language, law, and culture, and the imperative to understand the possibilities of revolutionary change. We find here a different Sorel, one who speaks in surprising ways to the 21st century.
The translation is accompanied by an introduction and by a set of notes which situate the text both in Sorel’s overall intellectual trajectory and in the fin de siècle debates from which it emerged.
Editor: E.P. Bos
In 1962–1967 Professor L.M. de Rijk published his Logica Modernorum – A Contribution to the History of Early Terminist Logic. The first part (1962) has the title: On the Twelfth Century Theories of Fallacy. The second part (two volumes, 1967) has as title: The Origin and the Early Development of the Theory of Supposition. De Rijk’s Logica Modernorum provides the basis for the modern study of medieval theories of supposition.
Now, nearly 50 years later, scholars have made great progress in the study of the properties of terms. De Rijk’s study was primarily about the early development of terminist logic, i.e. during the 12th and 13th centuries. Scholars have also investigated later developments well into the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Not only logical texts, but also texts on grammar have been published. Many of the scholars who have contributed to this development, present papers in this volume.
Contributors are Fabrizio Amerini, Jenny Ashworth, Allan Bäck, Bert Bos, Julie Brumberg-Chaumont, Laurent Cesalli, Lambert Marie de Rijk, Sten Ebbesen, Alessandro Conti, Catarina Dutilh-Novaes, Onno Kneepkens, Costantino Marmo, Dafne Mure, Claude Panaccio, Ernesto Perini Santos, Joel Lonfat, Angel d’Ors, Göran Sundholm and Luisa Valente.
Few studies tracing the history of liberalism have taken into account that its reception in non-Western or westernising countries, in the form of the denial or acceptance of its core values and institutions, is an important aspect of the liberal tradition. In Intellectual Origins of the Republic: Ahmet Ağaoğlu and the Genealogy of Liberalism in Turkey, Ӧzavcı investigates the histories of liberalism and nationalism in the late Russian and Ottoman Empires and early Republican Turkey through the prism of the life, ideas and times of the revolutionary writer Ahmet Ağaoğlu. This is the first in-depth study in the English language that places under scrutiny the Turkish idea of liberty and its endless yet destructive flirt with nationalism.
This publication presents a comprehensive review of the life and intellectual legacy of the Dutch Nobel Peace laureate and father of the Hague tradition of international law. It is the first research study based on a wealth of recently disclosed private and family files, and deepens and modifies all earlier evaluations. It enlarges on Asser’s achievements as legal practitioner, university don, pioneer of private international law, diplomat and arbitrator, and State Councillor. It discusses his durable impact as founder of international law bodies and institutions. It likewise highlights the impressive Asser family tradition that exemplifies 19th-century Jewish emancipation in Amsterdam, addresses Asser’s youth and student years, his role as family man and the impact of personal drama on his career.

Detailed Table of Contents.

Layout of the Book.
The main hypothesis of the volume is that globalization is a cultural phenomenon. Therefore, the book offers an explanation of how globalization emerged from cultural exchange between groups, nations, and religions. The articles in this volume register the thematically multi-dimensional and theoretically complex contribution of Polish research on globalization. Polish debates on globalization, as presented in this book, on the one hand reflect international disputes and controversies, and on the other hand address local issues. As their crucial feature, the articles in this volume exhibit a special sensitivity to historical and contemporary cultural contexts. They do not approach globalization as an abstract process, instead exploring it through the lens of clearly defined factors.
Volume Editor: Olga Tabachnikova
Russia is an enigmatic, mysterious country, situated between East and West not only spatially, but also mentally. Or so it is traditionally perceived in Western Europe and the Anglophone world at large. One of the distinctive features of Russian culture is its irrationalism, which revealed itself diversely in Russian life and thought, literature, music and visual arts, and has survived to the present day. Bridging the gap in existing scholarship, the current volume is an attempt at an integral and multifaceted approach to this phenomenon, and launches the study of Russian irrationalism in philosophy, theology, literature and the arts of the last two hundred years, together with its reflections in Russian reality.

Contributors: Tatiana Chumakova, David Gillespie, Arkadii Goldenberg, Kira Gordovich, Rainer Grübel, Elizabeth Harrison, Jeremy Howard, Aleksandr Ivashkin, Elena Kabkova, Sergei Kibalnik, Oleg Kovalov, Alexander McCabe, Barbara Olaszek, Oliver Ready, Oliver Smith, Margarita Odesskaia, Ildikó Mária Rácz, Lyudmila Safronova, Marilyn Schwinn Smith, Henrieke Stahl, Olga Stukalova, Olga Tabachnikova, Christopher John Tooke, and Natalia Vinokurova.
Writing in a Season of Nihilism
Author: Cor Hermans
In Interbellum Literature historian Cor Hermans presents a panorama of modernist writing in the ominous period 1918-1940. The book offers, in full scope, an engaging synthesis of the most stimulating ideas and tendencies in the novels and plays of a wide circle of writers from France (Proust, Gide, Camus, Céline, Tzara, Aragon, Simone Weil), England and Ireland (Virginia Woolf, Orwell, Joyce, Beckett), the USA (Scott Fitzgerald, Arthur Miller, O’Neill, Hemingway), Austria-Hungary (Musil, Broch, Kafka, Zweig, Roth), and Germany (Hesse, Jünger, Böll, Thomas Mann). Caught between world wars, they nevertheless succeeded in creating some of the best literature ever. They created a philosophy as well, rejecting bourgeois ‘mechanical’ society, designing escape routes from the nihilism of the times.