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Author: Guying Chen
Chen Guying, one of the leading scholars on Daoism in contemporary China, provides in his book The Philosophy of Life, A New Reading of the Zhuangzi a detailed analysis and a unique interpretation of Zhuangzi’s Inner, Outer and Miscellaneous chapters.
Unlike many other Chinese scholars Chen does not focus on a philological, but on a philosophical reading of the Zhuangzi highlighting the main topics of self-cultivation, aesthetics, and epistemology. Chen’s perspectives on the Zhuangzi range from the historical background of the Warring States Period to his own personal (political) experience. Since Chen is also a specialist on Nietzsche, he elaborates Zhuangzi’s philosophy of life and the idea of regulating one’s heart by drawing a parallel to Nietzsche’s perspectivism.
Abhidharma across Buddhist Scholastic Traditions
Editors: Bart Dessein and Weijen Teng
Text, History, and Philosophy. Abhidharma Across Buddhist Scholastic Traditions discusses Abhidhamma / Abhidharma as a specific exegetical method. In the first part of the volume, the development of the Buddhist argumentative technique is discussed. The second part investigates the importance of the Buddhist rational tradition for the development of Buddhist philosophy. The third part focuses on some peculiar doctrinal issues that resulted from rational Abhidharmic reflections. In this way, an outline of the development of the Abhidharma genre and of Abhidharmic notions and concepts in India, Central Asia, China, and Tibet from the life time of the historical Buddha to the tenth century CE is given.

Contributors are: Johannes Bronkhorst, Lance S. Cousins, Bart Dessein, Tamara Ditrich, Bhikkhu Kuala Lumpur Dhammajoti, Dylan Esler, Eric Greene, Goran Kardaš, Jowita Kramer, Chen-kuo Lin, Andrea Schlosser, Ingo Strauch, Weijen Teng and Yao-ming Tsai.
Mahāmudrā in India and Tibet presents cutting-edge research by European and North American scholars on the Indian origins and Tibetan interpretations of one of the most popular and influential of all Tibetan meditation traditions, Mahāmudrā, or the great seal. The contributions shed fresh light on important areas of Mahāmudrā studies, exploring the Great Seal’s place in the Mahāyāna Samādhirājasūtra, the Indian tantric Seven Siddhi Texts, Dunhuang Yogatantra texts, Mar pa’s Rngog lineage, and the Dgongs gcig literature of the ’Bri gung, as well as in the works of Yu mo Mi bskyod rdo rje, the Fourth Zhwa dmar pa Chos grags ye shes, the Eighth Karma pa Mi-bskyod rdo rje, and various Dge lugs masters of the 17th–18th centuries.
Contributors are: Jacob Dalton, Martina Draszczyk, Cecile Ducher, David Higgins, Roger R. Jackson, Casey Kemp, Adam Krug, Klaus-Dieter Mathes, Jan-Ulrich Sobisch, and Paul Thomas.
How did ‘Vedic man’ think about the destiny of man after death and related ethical issues? That heaven was the abode of the gods was undisputed, but was it also accessible to man in his pursuit of immortality? Was there a realm of the deceased or a hell? What terms were used to indicate these ‘yonder worlds’? What is their location in the cosmos and which cosmographic classifications are at the root of these concepts? The articles by Henk Bodewitz collected in this volume, published over a period of 45 years, between 1969 and 2013, deal with these issues on the basis of a systematic philological study of early Vedic texts, from the Ṛgveda to various Brāhmaṇas, Āraṇykas and Upaniṣads.
Essays in Honour of Alexis G.J.S. Sanderson
Academic study of the tantric traditions has blossomed in recent decades, in no small measure thanks to the magisterial contributions of Alexis G. J. S. Sanderson, until 2015 Spalding Professor of Eastern Religions and Ethics at Oxford University. This collection of essays honours him and touches several fields of Indology that he has helped to shape (or, in the case of the Śaiva religions, revolutionised): the history, ritual, and philosophies of tantric Buddhism, Śaivism and Vaiṣṇavism; religious art and architecture; and Sanskrit belles lettres. Grateful former students, joined by other experts influenced by his scholarship, here offer papers that make significant contributions to our understanding of the cultural, religious, political, and intellectual histories of premodern South and Southeast Asia.

Contributors are: Peter Bisschop, Judit Törzsök, Alex Watson, Isabelle Ratié, Christopher Wallis, Péter-Dániel Szántó, Srilata Raman, Csaba Dezső, Gergely Hidas, Nina Mirnig, John Nemec, Bihani Sarkar, Jürgen Hanneder, Diwakar Acharya, James Mallinson, Csaba Kiss, Jason Birch, Elizabeth Mills, Ryugen Tanemura, Anthony Tribe, and Parul Dave-Mukherji.
Recently relaunched in March 2019 with many improvements and new content, Brill’s Encyclopedia of Hinduism presents the latest research on all the main aspects of the Hindu traditions. Its essays are original work written by the world’s foremost scholars on Hinduism. The encyclopedia presents a balanced and even-handed view of Hinduism, recognizing the divergent perspectives and methods in the academic study of a religion that is both an ancient historical tradition and a flourishing tradition today. The encyclopedia embraces the greatest possible diversity, plurality, and heterogeneity, thus emphasizing that Hinduism encompasses a variety of regional traditions as well as a global world religion. Presenting all essays and research from the heralded printed edition, Brill’s Encyclopedia of Hinduism is now available in a fully searchable, dynamic digital format. The service will include all content from the six printed volumes.

Volume I Regions and the Regional Traditions Sacred Space and Time Gods, Goddesses, and Divine Powers

Volume II Sacred Texts and Languages Ritual Traditions Arts Concepts

Volume III Society Religious Specialists Religious Traditions Philosophy

Volume IV Historical Perspectives Poets, Teachers, and Saints Relation to Other Religions and Traditions Hinduism and Contemporary Issues

Volume V Religious Symbols Hinduism and Migration: Contemporary Communities outside South Asia Some Modern Religious Groups and Teachers

Volume VI Indices

Features and Benefits
• Access articles covering topics such as main regions within and beyond India and their regional traditions; sacred spaces and time and the various gods, goddesses, and divine powers of Hinduism past and present; major religious texts, literary genres, and sacred languages; performance, the arts, and ritual traditions; leading concepts and philosophical traditions; significant historical periods and eminent figures of saints, poets, and teachers; the interaction of Hinduism with other religions and the various responses of Hinduism to a number of contemporary issues such as feminism, human and animal rights, bioethics, and the Internet; and the place and role of Hinduism among communities in diaspora.
• Keyword and full-text search.
• Navigate extensive hyperlinked cross-references.
• Consult a comprehensive index of approximately 20,000 terms, concepts, and personal and place names accompanied by short explanations.
• View rich illustrations, maps, and photographs.


The Encyclopedia of Hinduism Online (ENHI) was originally published in 2012. It has now being relaunched with lots of improvements and some additional contents (but without a price increase).

*Improvements include:
1. All quotes, poems, lists, tables, images, diagrams, and other illustrations have a greatly improved appearance.
2. Corrections of factual errors handed in by authors over the years have been implemented.
3. “Forthcoming” in the bibliographies have been updated.
4. All URLs in the running texts and bibliographies have been verified and provided with a recent “accessed [date].” This resulted in removing close to half of them, as they are no longer available.

*New content (not included in the print edition):
1. Bhāgavatapurāṇa by Jonathan Edelmann
2. Cōmacuntara Nāyakar by Eric Steinschneider
3. Gayatri Pariwar by Daniel Heifetz
4. Haridwar by James Lochtefeld
5. Harivaṃśa by Simon Brodbeck
6. Kedarnath by Luke Whitmore
7. Omkareshwar by Jürgen Neuß
8. Pramukh Swami by Mamtora Bhakti
9. Śaiva Āgamas: The Four Pādas and Thirty-six Tattvas by T. Ganesan
10. Slavery by K.M. Shrimali
11. Soma by Matthew Clarke
12. Śrīdharasvāmin by Jonathan Edelmann
13. Srisailam by Prabhavati C. Reddy

In particular, the articles Soma (new insight regarding this psychotropic substance), Slavery (the topic having been denied/ignored for years in Indian studies), and Śaiva Āgamas (first time that the content – in contrast to the textual history – of this literary genre is dealt with in such depth) can be considered seminal.

Originally, Brill’s Encyclopedia of Hinduism was published as a finished product with no plans for updates. However, the editors have agreed to produce a 7th print volume, and these articles will be part of it. All existing customers will be able to access the new improved version and the added articles with no additional charge.
Buddhist Philosophy of Consciousness brings Buddhist voices to the study of consciousness. This book explores a variety of different Buddhist approaches to consciousness that developed out of the Buddhist theory of non-self. Topics taken up in these investigations include: how we are able to cognize our own cognitions; whether all conscious states involve conceptualization; whether distinct forms of cognition can operate simultaneously in a single mental stream; whether non-existent entities can serve as intentional objects; and does consciousness have an intrinsic nature, or can it only be characterized functionally? These questions have all featured in recent debates in consciousness studies. The answers that Buddhist philosophers developed to such questions are worth examining just because they may represent novel approaches to questions about consciousness.
Gyōnen’s Transmission of the Buddha Dharma in Three Countries is the first English translation of this work and a new assessment of it. Gyōnen (1240-1321) has been recognized for establishing a methodology for the study of Buddhism that would come to dominate Japan. The three countries Gyōnen considers are India, China and Japan. Ronald S. Green and Chanju Mun describe Gyōnen’s innovative doctrinal classification system ( panjiao) for the first time and compare it to other panjiao systems. They argue that Gyōnen’s arrangement and what he chose to exclude served political purposes in the Kamakura period, and thus engage current scholarship on the construction of Japanese Buddhism.