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Theories and Practices of Divination in East Asia
Volume Editor: Michael Lackner
Coping with the Future: Theories and Practices of Divination in East Asia offers insights into various techniques of divination, their evolution, and their assessment. The contributions cover the period from the earliest documents on East Asian mantic arts to their appearance in the present time.
The volume reflects the pervasive manifestations of divination in literature, religious and political life, and their relevance for society and individuals. Special emphasis is placed on cross-cultural influences and attempts to find theoretical foundations for divinatory practices. This edited volume is an initiative to study the phenomena of divination across East Asian cultures and beyond. It is also one of the first attempts to theorize divinatory practices through East Asian traditions.
Volume Editors: Jongtae Lim and Francesca Bray
Science and Confucian Statecraft in East Asia explores science and technology as practiced in the governments of premodern China and Korea. Contrary to the stereotypical image of East Asian bureaucracy as a generally negative force having hindered free enquiries and scientific progress, this volume offers a more nuanced picture of how science and technology was deployed in the service of state governance in East Asia. Presenting richly documented cases of the major state-sponsored sciences, astronomy, medicine, gunpowder production, and hydraulics, this book illustrates how rulers’ and scholar-officials’ concern for efficient and legitimate governance shaped production, circulation, and application of natural knowledge and useful techniques.

Contributors include: Francesca Bray, Christopher Cullen, Asaf Goldschmidt, Cho-ying Li, Jongtae Lim, Peter Lorge, Joong-Yang Moon, Kwon soo Park, Dongwon Shin, Pierre-Étienne Will
Mahāmudrā in India and Tibet presents cutting-edge research by European and North American scholars on the Indian origins and Tibetan interpretations of one of the most popular and influential of all Tibetan meditation traditions, Mahāmudrā, or the great seal. The contributions shed fresh light on important areas of Mahāmudrā studies, exploring the Great Seal’s place in the Mahāyāna Samādhirājasūtra, the Indian tantric Seven Siddhi Texts, Dunhuang Yogatantra texts, Mar pa’s Rngog lineage, and the Dgongs gcig literature of the ’Bri gung, as well as in the works of Yu mo Mi bskyod rdo rje, the Fourth Zhwa dmar pa Chos grags ye shes, the Eighth Karma pa Mi-bskyod rdo rje, and various Dge lugs masters of the 17th–18th centuries.
Contributors are: Jacob Dalton, Martina Draszczyk, Cecile Ducher, David Higgins, Roger R. Jackson, Casey Kemp, Adam Krug, Klaus-Dieter Mathes, Jan-Ulrich Sobisch, and Paul Thomas.
Essays in Honour of Alexis G.J.S. Sanderson
Academic study of the tantric traditions has blossomed in recent decades, in no small measure thanks to the magisterial contributions of Alexis G. J. S. Sanderson, until 2015 Spalding Professor of Eastern Religions and Ethics at Oxford University. This collection of essays honours him and touches several fields of Indology that he has helped to shape (or, in the case of the Śaiva religions, revolutionised): the history, ritual, and philosophies of tantric Buddhism, Śaivism and Vaiṣṇavism; religious art and architecture; and Sanskrit belles lettres. Grateful former students, joined by other experts influenced by his scholarship, here offer papers that make significant contributions to our understanding of the cultural, religious, political, and intellectual histories of premodern South and Southeast Asia.

Contributors are: Peter Bisschop, Judit Törzsök, Alex Watson, Isabelle Ratié, Christopher Wallis, Péter-Dániel Szántó, Srilata Raman, Csaba Dezső, Gergely Hidas, Nina Mirnig, John Nemec, Bihani Sarkar, Jürgen Hanneder, Diwakar Acharya, James Mallinson, Csaba Kiss, Jason Birch, Elizabeth Mills, Ryugen Tanemura, Anthony Tribe, and Parul Dave-Mukherji.
Author: Eyal Aviv
In Differentiating the Pearl from the Fish-Eye, Eyal Aviv offers an account of Ouyang Jingwu (1871-1943), a leading intellectual who revived the Buddhist scholastic movement during the early Republican period in China.

Ouyang believed that authentic Indian Buddhism was an alternative to the prevalent Chinese Buddhist doctrines of his time. Aviv shows how Ouyang’s rhetoric of authenticity won the movement well-known admirers but also influential critics. This debate shaped modern intellectual history in China and has lost none of its relevancy today.
Recently relaunched in March 2019 with many improvements and new content, Brill’s Encyclopedia of Hinduism presents the latest research on all the main aspects of the Hindu traditions. Its essays are original work written by the world’s foremost scholars on Hinduism. The encyclopedia presents a balanced and even-handed view of Hinduism, recognizing the divergent perspectives and methods in the academic study of a religion that is both an ancient historical tradition and a flourishing tradition today. The encyclopedia embraces the greatest possible diversity, plurality, and heterogeneity, thus emphasizing that Hinduism encompasses a variety of regional traditions as well as a global world religion. Presenting all essays and research from the heralded printed edition, Brill’s Encyclopedia of Hinduism is now available in a fully searchable, dynamic digital format. The service will include all content from the six printed volumes.

Volume I Regions and the Regional Traditions Sacred Space and Time Gods, Goddesses, and Divine Powers

Volume II Sacred Texts and Languages Ritual Traditions Arts Concepts

Volume III Society Religious Specialists Religious Traditions Philosophy

Volume IV Historical Perspectives Poets, Teachers, and Saints Relation to Other Religions and Traditions Hinduism and Contemporary Issues

Volume V Religious Symbols Hinduism and Migration: Contemporary Communities outside South Asia Some Modern Religious Groups and Teachers

Volume VI Indices

Features and Benefits
• Access articles covering topics such as main regions within and beyond India and their regional traditions; sacred spaces and time and the various gods, goddesses, and divine powers of Hinduism past and present; major religious texts, literary genres, and sacred languages; performance, the arts, and ritual traditions; leading concepts and philosophical traditions; significant historical periods and eminent figures of saints, poets, and teachers; the interaction of Hinduism with other religions and the various responses of Hinduism to a number of contemporary issues such as feminism, human and animal rights, bioethics, and the Internet; and the place and role of Hinduism among communities in diaspora.
• Keyword and full-text search.
• Navigate extensive hyperlinked cross-references.
• Consult a comprehensive index of approximately 20,000 terms, concepts, and personal and place names accompanied by short explanations.
• View rich illustrations, maps, and photographs.


The Encyclopedia of Hinduism Online (ENHI) was originally published in 2012. It has now being relaunched with lots of improvements and some additional contents (but without a price increase).

*Improvements include:
1. All quotes, poems, lists, tables, images, diagrams, and other illustrations have a greatly improved appearance.
2. Corrections of factual errors handed in by authors over the years have been implemented.
3. “Forthcoming” in the bibliographies have been updated.
4. All URLs in the running texts and bibliographies have been verified and provided with a recent “accessed [date].” This resulted in removing close to half of them, as they are no longer available.

*New content (not included in the print edition):
1. Bhāgavatapurāṇa by Jonathan Edelmann
2. Cōmacuntara Nāyakar by Eric Steinschneider
3. Gayatri Pariwar by Daniel Heifetz
4. Haridwar by James Lochtefeld
5. Harivaṃśa by Simon Brodbeck
6. Kedarnath by Luke Whitmore
7. Omkareshwar by Jürgen Neuß
8. Pramukh Swami by Mamtora Bhakti
9. Śaiva Āgamas: The Four Pādas and Thirty-six Tattvas by T. Ganesan
10. Slavery by K.M. Shrimali
11. Soma by Matthew Clarke
12. Śrīdharasvāmin by Jonathan Edelmann
13. Srisailam by Prabhavati C. Reddy

In particular, the articles Soma (new insight regarding this psychotropic substance), Slavery (the topic having been denied/ignored for years in Indian studies), and Śaiva Āgamas (first time that the content – in contrast to the textual history – of this literary genre is dealt with in such depth) can be considered seminal.

Originally, Brill’s Encyclopedia of Hinduism was published as a finished product with no plans for updates. However, the editors have agreed to produce a 7th print volume, and these articles will be part of it. All existing customers will be able to access the new improved version and the added articles with no additional charge.
Countering the Neo-Confucian Critiques in the Hufa lun and the Yusŏk chirŭi non
Author: Uri Kaplan
While the Neo-Confucian critique of Buddhism is fairly well-known, little attention has been given to the Buddhist reactions to this harangue. The fact is, however, that over a dozen apologetic essays have been written by Buddhists in China, Korea, and Japan in response to the Neo-Confucians. Buddhist Apologetics in East Asia offers an introduction to this Buddhist literary genre. It centers on full translations of two dominant apologetic works—the Hufa lun (護法論), written by a Buddhist politician in twelfth-century China, and the Yusŏk chirŭi non (儒釋質疑論), authored by an anonymous monk in fifteenth-century Korea. Put together, these two texts demonstrate the wide variety of polemical strategies and the cross-national intertextuality of East Asian Buddhist apologetics.