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Founded in 1979 by the Dipartimento di Studi del Mondo Classico e del Mediterraneo Antico, AION Sezione filologico-letteraria is currently published on behalf of the Dipartmento di Asia, Africa e Mediterraneo of the Università di Napoli "l'Orientale".
AION publishes articles in the field of philology, literature, and history of Greek and Latin culture and its transmission throughout the centuries.
The publications of the journal are preferably characterised by a multidisciplinary perspective and/or a focus on the study of the interactions between Graeco-Roman culture and the other cultures of the ancient Mediterranean, the exploitation of data from archaeological disciplines and the study of iconographic sources. The journal especially welcomes studies with an anthropological approach to the study of Greek and Latin cultures and/or a focus on the relationship between oral tradition and literature.
AION purports to facilitate cooperation among scholars of all the fields related to the ancient world and to disseminate their research results. The journal is aimed at academic readers, libraries, and cultural institutions interested in the ancient world. It accepts articles in English, French, German, and Italian.
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Philological and Historical Commentary to Ammianus Marcellinus' Res Gestae
Ammianus Marcellinus Online is the digital version of the standard and the only complete commentary on Ammianus’ Res Gestae, by J. den Boeft, D. den Hengst, H.C. Teitler and J.W. Drijvers (books 20-31), and P. de Jonge (books 14-19). Their philological and historical commentary has received much praise in the international scholarly world, and has been completed in 2018.
Ammianus Marcellinus Online includes the commentaries to books 14-31 of Res Gestae as well as two full text editions in Latin on which the commentaries are based (Clark, 1910 and Seyfarth, 1978).
Ammianus Marcellinus (4th century CE) was a Roman soldier, historian and author of Res Gestae, a major historical work on the history of Rome from the period of Emperor Nerva (96 CE) to the death of Emperor Valens (378 CE). Res Gestae originally consisted of thirty-one books, although the first thirteen books have been lost. The surviving eighteen books (books 14-31) cover the period from 353 to 378. The work is of great importance to scholars in Roman history, Latin philology, military history and historiography in general.

Features and benefits
• The only complete historical and philological commentary on Ammianus
• Access to all available commentaries (books 14-31)
• Includes two complete text editions (Clark, 1910 and Seyfarth, 1978)
• Runs on new and bespoke platform for text editions: Brill Scholarly Editions
• Full-text searchable
• Languages: Latin, Greek, German, English

Review
"A monumental work of scholarship that no historian of the late fourth century can afford to ignore. [...] One could hardly expect more of any commentary." - in: Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2018.09.50
1. Greek and Roman clay lamps. A catalogue. With photographs by W.B. Robertson and others
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In the post-Enlightenment world, philosophy and religion have come to occupy different, even opposed, domains. But how were they related before this? What were the commonalities and dissimilarities between them? Did they already contain the seeds of their later division – or do they still share enough in common to allow meaningful conversation between them?

This new Brill series “Ancient Philosophy & Religion” provides an interdisciplinary platform for monographs, edited volumes and commentaries on this issue. It is edited by two leading scholars in the fields it brings together, George Boys-Stones (Ancient Philosophy) and George van Kooten (New Testament Studies), and is supported by an editorial board whose members are known for their work in the area. It invites scholars of ancient philosophy, Classics, early Judaism, ancient Judaism, New Testament & early Christianity, and all other relevant fields, to showcase their research on ancient philosophy and religion and to contribute to the debate.

The series’ subject matter is symbolized by its icon, used by courtesy and permission of the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. It represents a dialogue between philosophers, as shown on one of the reliefs of the funeral sacrificial table (mensa) from the “House of Proclus” on the Southern slope of the Acropolis at Athens, excavated in 1955. Dating from 350-325 BC, the reliefs of the mensa depict, after the lamentation and the farewell, the posthumous encounter of the deceased with the philosophers (1950 NAM 90).

The editors very much welcome proposals for monographs, edited volumes and even commentaries on relevant texts.

This online publication offers the text of Apuleius' Metamorphoses, along with the acclaimed Groningen Commentary Series to this text, and an English translation. Additionally, the texts of Pro se de Magia and Florida are included as well as commentaries for both works by Vincent Hunink.
Apuleius of Madauros wrote his eleven books of the Metamorphoses (or The Golden Ass) in the late second century CE. It is the first fully extant specimen of an extended Latin work of prose fiction. It is written in a Latin which on the one hand shows elements of the everyday speech and of the colloquial language of the period, but on the other hand incorporates these elements in a sophisticated prose which bears the more general characteristics of an archaizing, artificial language. For the study of Latin prose art as well as of the development of everyday or colloquial Latin this work is an important monument, representative of the Latin prose art of the period. Apart from a purely philological and linguistic point of view, this text is equally important for the study of the development of Latin and European literature. Virtually lost during the Early Middle Ages, the Metamorphoses came to be known and imitated from the fourteenth century onwards, and has undoubtedly played an important role during the emergence of the novelistic literature of Western Europe.

The acclaimed Groningen commentary to the Metamorphoses was published as a multi-volume book series between 1977 and 2021 by the Groningen Commentaries on Apuleius group. It includes the text itself, a commentary and a translation. The complete series is now available online for the first time, including the recently published commentary on Book III of the Metamorphoses by Leonardo Costantini (2021)
In print, the Groningen commentary is also available as a set of print books in the series Apuleius Madaurensis.
Author:
Mnemosyne Supplements has existed as a book series for about 60 years, providing a forum for the publication of now almost 400 scholarly works on all aspects of the Ancient World, including inscriptions, papyri, language, the history of material culture and mentality, the history of peoples and institutions, but also latterly the classical tradition, for example, neo-Latin literature and the history of Classical scholarship.

Works published include monographs, critical text editions, commentaries, critical bibliographies and collections of essays by various authors on closely defined themes.

A number of volumes of the Mnemosyne Supplements series are published within the subseries History and Archaeology of Classical Antiquity and Late Antique Literature.

The series published an average of 11,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
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