A Critical and Methodological Perspective
In this first volume of Brill Research Perspectives in Theology, the field of comparative theology is mapped with particular attention to the tradition associated with Francis Clooney but noting the global and wider context of theology in a comparative mode. There are four parts. In the first section the current field is mapped and its methodological and theological aspects are explored. The second part considers what the deconstruction of religion means for comparative theology. It also takes into consideration turns to lived and material religion. In the third part, issues of power, representation, and the subaltern are considered, including the place of feminist and queer theory in comparative theology. Finally, the contribution of philosophical hermeneutics is considered. The text notes key trends, develops original models of practice and method, and picks out and discusses critical issues within the field.
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The first comprehensive survey of the important corpus of Indic literature on Sanskrit grammar, extant in Tibetan translation in the Buddhist canon.
Core of the study is the description of the forty-seven Sanskrit grammatical treatises covering some two thousand folios in the canon. The contents of these texts and the historical information regarding their Tibetan translators are examined in detail. Further chapters are devoted to the grammatical analysis in an eighth-century Tibetan handbook for translators, and to data from Tibetan historiography.
The book offers the first systematic study of the extent and the historical development of the Tibetan expertise in Sanskrit grammar, a central scholastic discipline in Buddhism. It opens up a section of Tibetan literature essential to the understanding of the Indo-Tibetan indigenous grammatical traditions.
This first, systematic survey of the Tibetan non-canonical literature dealing with Sanskrit grammar, partly consists of translations of Indic works, such as revisions of canonical versions, and translations of works not contained in the canon, and partly of original Tibetan works.
In the first chapter of the book a detailed description of these textual materials is presented – sixty-one titles in total – which were produced during all periods of Tibetan literary history, from the ninth to the twentieth centuries. The second chapter discusses one specific effect of the impetus of Indic traditional grammar within Tibetan scholastics, namely the influence of Indic models of linguistic description on Tibetan indigenous grammar.
This particular assimilation of an Indic technical discipline into Tibetan scholarship is examined in detail, and it is shown that other segments of Indic Buddhism were sources of inspiration and derivation for the Tibetan grammarians as well.
An Edition and Annotated Translation of Mālinīślokavārttika I, 1-399
The first part of the ‘Versified Commentary on the Mālinītantra’ (Mālinīślokvārttika) by the tenth-century theologian Abhinavagupta, which is translated here for the first time, presents a philosophy of Śaiva revelation, conceived of as a descent of the highest non-dual form of knowledge, through the different levels of speech, into the knowledge embodied in the canon of Tantras or Agamas on which the Śaiva religion is based. The aim of the text is to demonstrate the logic behind the claim of the monistic Tantric schools on which Abhinavagupta bases his philosophy.

The present volume deals in its introduction with the scriptural background of the Śaiva religion because that is a prerequisite for understanding many of the arguments in the text. The translation is accompanied by a re-edition of the Sanskrit text with the help of two manuscripts not consulted before, and a running commentary. A fragment of the Śrīkaṇṭī, which is probably the source for some of Abhinavaguptas theories of the Śaiva canon, is transcribed in an appendix.
Primo abhisamaya. Testo e note critiche
Index of South and Southeast Asian Art and Archaeology
The ABIA Online bibliography (South and Southeast Asian Art and Archaeology Index) helps scholars and students trace publications on the art and architecture, archaeology, inscriptions, coins and crafts of South and Southeast Asia. Its coverage includes the shared cultural heritage of Buddhism, Hinduism and Islam. It also brings out the bonds between South and Southeast Asia in societal traditions and ceremonies, as evident in inscriptions, trade and craft specializations, right from the prehistoric past up to the present. ABIA’s geographic and topical reach is wide. Its coverage ranges from excavations at the early cities of the Indus Valley in Pakistan to the sculptural richness of Angkor’s temples in Cambodia; from Buddhist manuscript art in Nepal and Tibet to contemporary painting in Bali; from textiles woven for early kings of Thailand to present day fashion in the booming cities of India. Timewise, ABIA’s coverage spans from the time when human activity becomes archaeologically manifest, to modern times. Specialist bibliographers have compiled some 55,000 records since 1928. Many of these carry annotations that concisely explain their contents. All records come with field-specific keywords. Recent records often offer direct links through DOI or http addresses to the articles. The ABIA Online is updated on a quarterly basis to keep up with new academic publications. The database is a long-term recipient of support by the Jan Gonda Fonds of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.
Volume two, containing circa 2000 records selected from the annotated bibliographic database on South and Southeast Asian art and archaeology (formerly Annual Bibliography of Indian Archaeology) found at www.abia.net. Compiled by an international team of specialists brought together in a project of The International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS) in Leiden. Features all forms of scholarly publications, ranging from survey works to small but important articles in monographs and journals, published world wide between 1997 and 2001.
Subjects include pre- and protohistory, historical archaeology, ancient art history, modern art history, material culture, epigraphy and palaeography, numismatics and sigillography (seals). Covered are South Asia and its culturally related regions (Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Tibet) and Southeast Asia (including related regions in South China and the Pacific). The detailed bibliographic descriptions (which faithfully reproduce the original diacritics), controlled keywords and many elucidating annotations make this reference work into an indispensable guide to recent scholarly work on the prehistory and arts of South/Southeast Asia.