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This book explores the notebooks of S. Belle, an astrologer who lived in late fifteenth-century France, as a case study of late medieval astrological practice. These notebooks combine astrological doctrine, a large collection of horoscopes, an almanac, and three complete judgements of nativities. By studying Belle’s methods, processes of learning, and practices, this book contributes to a better understanding of the internal architecture of astrology in the pre-modern world; this includes its techniques, methodologies, goals, transmission, and development throughout history. It offers an internalist view of the practice of astrology, as a counterpart to the existing research into astrology’s social and cultural impact.
Editor: Aurora Panzica
Nicole Oresme was one of the most original and influential thinkers of the fourteenth century. He is best known for his mathematical discoveries, his economic theories, as well as his vernacular translations of cosmological and ethical texts that were undertaken at the request of King Charles V. This volume sheds light on the beginning of Oresme's scientific activity at the University of Paris (ca. 1340 – ca. 1350), a period of his intellectual career about which little is known. Over the course of this decade, Oresme lectured on many Aristotelian texts on natural philosophy, such as the Physics, On the Heavens, On generation and corruption, Meteorology, and On the Soul. Oresme's commentaries on Aristotle's Meteorology count among his only unpublished texts. This volume presents the first critical edition of books I-II.10 of the second redaction of Oresme's Questions on Meteorology. The edition is preceded by a historical and philological introduction that discusses the context of Oresme’s scientific career and examines the manuscript tradition.
The Intersection of Art, Science, and Nature in Ancient Literature and its Renaissance Reception
Editor: Guy Hedreen
The interplay between nature, science, and art in antiquity and the early modern period differs significantly from late modern expectations. In this book scholars from ancient studies as well as early modern studies, art history, literary criticism, philosophy, and the history of science, explore that interplay in several influential ancient texts and their reception in the Renaissance. The Natural History of Pliny, De Architectura of Vitruvius, De Rerum Natura of Lucretius, Automata of Hero, and Timaios of Plato among other texts reveal how fields of inquiry now considered distinct were originally understood as closely interrelated. In our choice of texts, we focus on materialistic theories of nature, knowledge, and art that remain underappreciated in ancient and early modern studies even today.
The role played by technology in transforming human societies has been a preoccupation of the modern period. Technology and Change in History is a peer-reviewed* series of monographs which surveys the development of technology from a variety of different historical perspectives. Each volume aims to present to scholars, graduate students and non-specialists alike the current state of knowledge in the field. Earlier volumes in the series have focused on the Ancient Near East and the Greco-Roman World, as well as the medieval and early modern periods. Over the coming years, the time period and geographical coverage of the series will be extended to encompass the prehistoric and modern periods, as well as Asia, Africa, the Americas and Oceania.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Stefan Einarson or to one of the series editors: Adam Lucas (University of Wollongong) or Steven A. Walton (Michigan Technological University).

*For the Brill Author Guide which also includes information on Brill's peer review process click here.
The present volume offers a new account of the activities of the International Association for the History of Religions during the Cold War. By focusing on the IAHR membership of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in 1957, the book reconsiders the impact of the Iron Curtain . Valerio Severino examines unpublished international correspondences, bureaucratic requests, confidential reports submitted by the delegates after their participation in congresses in Western Europe and the USA. Facts and insights about leading Hungarian scholars and internal processes of the IAHR are reconstructed in detail. Through doing so, Severino is able to evaluate the permeability of the Iron Curtain, the exchange of knowledge between the opposing blocs, the ideological control exercised through the Academy and the ways in which academics subjected their work to this obligation.
Gregorio a San Vicente and the Flemish Jesuit Mathematics School
Author: Ad J. Meskens
In Between Tradition and Innovation, Ad Meskens traces the profound influence of a group of Flemish Jesuits on the course of mathematics in the seventeenth century. Using manuscript evidence, this book argues that one of the Flemish mathematics school’s professors, Gregorio a San Vicente (1584–1667), had developed a logically sound integration method more than a decade before the Italian mathematician Bonaventura Cavalieri. Although San Vincente’s superiors refused to grant him permission to publish his results, his methods went on to influence numerous other mathematicians through his students, many of whom became famous mathematicians in their own right. By carefully tracing their careers and outlining their biographies, Meskens convincingly shows that they made a number of ground-breaking contributions to fields ranging from mathematics and mechanics to optics and architecture.