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Domestic Practice vis-à-vis International Standards
Tadesse Simie Metekia’s Prosecution of Core Crimes in Ethiopia offers an in-depth analysis of core crimes trials in Ethiopia within the broader frame of international criminal law. This book is a result of an unprecedented data collection, a meticulous exploration of relevant national and international norms and case laws, as well as a full engagement with the existing literature on the domestic application of international criminal law.
A comparative examination of the actual trials and the manner in which Ethiopia set prosecutions of core crimes in motion, Metekia’s book is a significant achievement in terms of furthering academic knowledge and of contributing to the wider policy debates on international criminal justice and on the role of states in prosecuting atrocities.
Social License and Dispute Resolution in the Extractive Industries is a broad collection offering insights from both renowned academics and practitioners on the intersection of international dispute resolution and the social license to operate in the extractive industries. With its combined academic and practical perspective, the book focuses on mining disputes and addresses a broad array of issues, such as third party funding, grievance and redress, as well as the protection of human rights and the environment. In addition, it is the first work in the market that discusses the proposed rules of the world's first and only Global Natural Resources Dispute Resolution Center (GNDC).
The Chinese and Comparative Law Series is a refereed scholarly series dedicated to the publication of studies of Chinese law in English, including works solely on Chinese law or Chinese law in a comparative legal context. The series also welcomes edited volumes. It aims for critical analyses of Chinese law in a broad sense and the presentation of legal developments in China to an international audience of lawyers and non-lawyers. It welcomes studies in all areas of law and studies of an interdisciplinary nature. Titles in the Chinese and Comparative Law series will be of particular interest to the international community of academics and practising lawyers, policy makers, national and international governmental and non-governmental organisations, and others interested in the study of comparative law.

International Development Policy is a critical source of analysis of development policy and international cooperation trends and is aimed at scholars, policymakers, development professionals, and journalists. It offers a diverse range of academic views from both industrialised countries and emerging economies.

This is a fully Open Access book series. All titles in the series will become available both in print and as Open Access ebooks.

Visit International Development Policy online.

The series has published an average of one volume per year since 2014.

This series critically examines issues of legal doctrine and practice in Central and Eastern Europe, including studies on the harmonization of legal principles and rules; the legal impact of the intertwining of domestic economies, on the one hand, with regional economies and the processes of international trade and investment on the other. The series offers a forum for discussion of topical questions of public and private law from domestic, regional, and international perspectives. Comparative research that provides insights in legal developments that can be communicated to those interested in questions, not only of law, but also of politics, economics, and of society of countries in the region also finds a home in the series.

For information about a related title, visit the webpages of the Brill journal Review of Central and East European Law.
Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only scholarly publication devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole.

Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent
Please click here for the online version including the abstracts of the articles of the African Yearbook of International Law.
Launched in 1965, the Australian Year Book of International Law (AYBIL) is Australia’s longest standing and most prestigious dedicated international law publication.
The Year Book aims to uniquely combine scholarly commentary with contributions from Australian government officials. Each volume contains a mix of scholarly articles, invited lectures, book reviews, notes of decisions by Australian and international courts, recent legislation, and collected Australian international law state practice.
It is a valuable resource for those working in the field of international law, including government officials, international organisation officials, non-government and community organisations, legal practitioners, academics and other researchers, as well as students studying international law, international relations, human rights and international affairs.
It focuses on Australian practice in international law and general international law, across a broad range of sub-fields including human rights, environmental law and legal theory, which are of interest to international lawyers worldwide. Volume 38 features a set of Special Issue papers on the theme of ‘The Backlash against International Law: Australian Perspectives’. These articles originated as papers presented to a June 2019 workshop at the Australian National University (ANU), which launched a global research partnership project between scholars at ANU, Indiana University and the University of Maryland.
The Austrian Review of International and European Law is an annual publication that provides a scholarly forum for the discussion of issues of international and European law, with emphasis on topics of special interest for Austria. Each volume of the Review includes general articles, current developments, and the comprehensive annual digest of Austrian practice in international law, encompassing judicial decisions, executive as well as parliamentary documents relating to international law. The concluding parts of the Review contain longer book reviews and shorter book notes. Volume 23 covers 2018 and features ten stories of international law spanning across the last century.
The African Union’s Rethinking of International Criminal Justice
In An African Criminal Court Dominique Mystris explores the potential contribution of a regional criminal court to international criminal law and justice across the continent. As set out in the Malabo Protocol, the court’s approach to international core crimes builds on from the current international system. Yet, the additional crimes and region-centric approach reflect the continental concerns.

To fully realise the court’s contribution, the African Union’s institutional objectives and approach to justice, peace and security, the author argues for the inclusion of the court within the African Peace and Security Architecture. By adopting such a holistic understanding of the Malabo Protocol court within the AU structure, a more accurate depiction of the potential of an African criminal court emerges.
Author: Peter Kempees
The European Convention on Human Rights is now crucial to decisions to be taken by the military and their political leaders in ‘hard power’ situations – that is, classical international and non-international armed conflict, belligerent occupation, peacekeeping and peace-enforcing and anti-terrorism and anti-piracy operations, but also hybrid warfare, cyber-attack and targeted assassination. Guidance is needed, therefore, on how Convention law relates to these decisions.

That guidance is precisely what this book aims to offer. It focuses primarily on States’ accountability under the Convention, but also shows that human rights law, used creatively, can actually help States achieve their objectives.