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In: Multilingual Europe, Multilingual Europeans
In: Multilingual Europe, Multilingual Europeans

Abstract

Gadjo Dilo was directed in 1997 by Tony Gatlif, a French filmmaker about whom it is often specified that he is of Roma origin. The main topic of this road movie is not multilingualism but as many of the works studied in the second part of this volume, Gadjo Dilo represents the encounter between subjects who must find ways to communicate in some European linguistic borderzone, because they do not speak the same language. We follow a Frenchman, Stéphane, who travels to a small village in Romania, to look for a singer he will never find. Instead, he will take the time to discover a new language, or rather what it means to learn the rudiments of a minority language in the absence of any educational or institutional frame.

In: Multilingual Europe, Multilingual Europeans

Abstract

Gadjo Dilo was directed in 1997 by Tony Gatlif, a French filmmaker about whom it is often specified that he is of Roma origin. The main topic of this road movie is not multilingualism but as many of the works studied in the second part of this volume, Gadjo Dilo represents the encounter between subjects who must find ways to communicate in some European linguistic borderzone, because they do not speak the same language. We follow a Frenchman, Stéphane, who travels to a small village in Romania, to look for a singer he will never find. Instead, he will take the time to discover a new language, or rather what it means to learn the rudiments of a minority language in the absence of any educational or institutional frame.

In: Multilingual Europe, Multilingual Europeans
Author: Jean-Marc Moura

Abstract

English has not always been the obvious European lingua franca that defenders of multilingualism fear will endanger European diversity. France also has a long and strong tradition of linguistic interventionism and the attempt to impose French as a lingua franca beyond the borders of the nation state has led to a clear differentiation between French and Francophone literatures. Francophone literatures are presented as multicultural (therefore not ‘typically French’) and are attributed a specific status within the literary canon. In this chapter, I propose to concentrate on the characteristics of ‘Francophone’ texts and to describe the main literary strategies developed by Francophone writers to represent the linguistic practices born in multiculturalist contexts and to emphasize the multicultural nature of their works.

In: Multilingual Europe, Multilingual Europeans
Author: Jean-Marc Moura

Abstract

English has not always been the obvious European lingua franca that defenders of multilingualism fear will endanger European diversity. France also has a long and strong tradition of linguistic interventionism and the attempt to impose French as a lingua franca beyond the borders of the nation state has led to a clear differentiation between French and Francophone literatures. Francophone literatures are presented as multicultural (therefore not ‘typically French’) and are attributed a specific status within the literary canon. In this chapter, I propose to concentrate on the characteristics of ‘Francophone’ texts and to describe the main literary strategies developed by Francophone writers to represent the linguistic practices born in multiculturalist contexts and to emphasize the multicultural nature of their works.

In: Multilingual Europe, Multilingual Europeans
Author: Dominic Thomas

Abstract

Fortress Europe, as the European Union has come to be known in official Euro-speak with reference to the multi-country juridical border control mechanisms deployed under its aegis, and fortress Europe as it is constructed and perceived in the minds of global migrants attempting to enter the geographic zone it now contains provides a compelling framework for socio-cultural and socio-political inquiry into the multidimensionality of linguistic practices associated with this space. This essay will explore several factors: the linguistic challenges faced by migrants entering and then assuming residency in the EU and the impact of the European Union Pact on Migration and Asylum and the Union for the Mediterranean project. I analyze the new grammars of migration constructed from various concepts: detention zones, detainees, refugee camps, forced repatriation, filtering systems, undocumented, illegals and expulsion. The objective is to establish a conjunction between language and the evidentiary mode it seeks to communicate.

In: Multilingual Europe, Multilingual Europeans
Author: Dominic Thomas

Abstract

Fortress Europe, as the European Union has come to be known in official Euro-speak with reference to the multi-country juridical border control mechanisms deployed under its aegis, and fortress Europe as it is constructed and perceived in the minds of global migrants attempting to enter the geographic zone it now contains provides a compelling framework for socio-cultural and socio-political inquiry into the multidimensionality of linguistic practices associated with this space. This essay will explore several factors: the linguistic challenges faced by migrants entering and then assuming residency in the EU and the impact of the European Union Pact on Migration and Asylum and the Union for the Mediterranean project. I analyze the new grammars of migration constructed from various concepts: detention zones, detainees, refugee camps, forced repatriation, filtering systems, undocumented, illegals and expulsion. The objective is to establish a conjunction between language and the evidentiary mode it seeks to communicate.

In: Multilingual Europe, Multilingual Europeans
In: Multilingual Europe, Multilingual Europeans
In: Multilingual Europe, Multilingual Europeans