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In: Mission Station Christianity
In: Mission Station Christianity
In 1838, William Ellis of the LMS published a History of Madagascar―considered a key primary source for nineteenth-century Malagasy history. Four years later, David Griffiths, longest serving member of the Madagascar Mission, published Hanes Madagascar (“History of Madagascar”) in Welsh. Campbell’s study explores the intriguing relationship between these works and their authors. It analyses the role of Griffiths; presents evidence that much of Ellis’ History derived from Griffiths’ research; and presents the first ever translation of Hanes Madagascar (with extensive annotations). This study suggests that the tensions arising from the different cultural perceptions of Welsh and English missionaries moulded the destiny of the Madagascar mission. It will hopefully inspire re-evaluation of other missions and their relationship to British imperial policy.
Christian Transatlantic Missions, Islamic Migration to Germany
This volume looks at how religious identity and symbolic ethnicity influence migration. Religion – Christianity – was an important factor in European transatlantic migrations; religion – Islam – is a major issue in the immigration debate in “post-secular” Germany (and Europe) today. Essays focus on German missionaries and their efforts in the eighteenth century to establish new communal forms of living with Native Americans as religious encounters. In a comparative fashion, Islamic transnational migration into Germany in the twenty-first century is explored in a second group of essays that look at Muslim populations in Germany. They provide an insight into the ongoing discussions in Germany about modern migration and the role of religion. This volume is of interest to all who are engaged in issues of historical and contemporary migration, in Cultural and German Studies.
This part of the archives of the Gujarat Diocese of the Church of North India contains minutes of meetings, correspondence and other documents of the Irish Presbyterian Mission Council in Gujarat and relevant local committees.
Part of the archives of the Gujarat Diocese of the Church of North India is a selection of early printed monographs. This section contains a selection of monographs that were printed outside India, mostly in London and Belfast, and were identified as relevant for research purposes. The selection consists of 85 volumes. A separate title list and MARC21 records are also available.
Part of the archives of the Gujarat Diocese of the Church of North India is a selection of early printed monographs. This section contains the monographs that were printed by mission presses but not in Surat and consists of 58 volumes. A separate title list and MARC21 records are also available.
Part of the archives of the Gujarat Diocese of the Church of North India is a selection of early printed monographs. This section contains the monographs that were printed by the Irish Presbyterian Mission Press in Surat and consists of 105 volumes. A separate title list and MARC21 records are also available.
This part of the archives of the Gujarat Diocese of the Church of North India contains the annual reports prepared by the Irish Presbyterian Mission Council and describing the achievements of the past year. The reports also provide information about the financial situation of the IP Mission. The covered years range from 1851 till 1965.
Annual reports of the Missions’ Orphanage have been added as a separate section. These reports range from 1870 till 1958.
Zur Hermeneutik der chinesisch-christlichen Begegnung nach Wu Leichuan (1869-1944)
This work explores the Christian-Chinese encounter from a non-Confucian perspective, exemplified by the comparison between Jesus and the philosopher Mozi (5th c. B.C.). The investigation is based on the work Mozi yu Yesu of the Hanlin scholar and convert Wu Leichuan (1869–1944). The first part gives a biographical sketch and discusses the writings and prolegomena of the Sino-Christian hermeneutics of Wu. Part two describes the social reformer Mozi and his teachings that are interpreted by Wu in a Christian way. Part three presents the life and teachings of Jesus according to Wu as well as his attempts to establish a “Ruist” view of the Christian tradition. Part four is dedicated to the comparison between Mozi and Jesus, with special emphasis on Wu’s understanding of religion. The fifth part refers to the defectiveness of the Chinese and Christian traditions and to the necessity of a return to the “true and original Dao.”