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Moisés Almela and Pascual Cantos

Abstract

This paper presents a proposal for refining the methods of semantic description based on corpus collocational data. The central tenet of our proposal is that the conventional description of collocation as a bipartite structure, along with the binary contrast of node and collocate, is inadequate for explaining certain forms of interaction observed in patterns involving more than two lexical items. Our contention is that, in addition to node and collocate, a third category (co-collocate) is required to account for those cases in which the cohesiveness of a collocational pair is not self-contained and the node-collocate attraction shows dependency on an element external to the pair itself. After explaining some necessary theoretical distinctions, we will present a step-by-step description of the methodology. Then we will illustrate how it can be applied to the analysis of co-collocational patterns found in the vicinity of the word consequence.

Series:

Yves Bestgen and Sylviane Granger

Abstract

In the last decade, learner corpus research has been characterised by a wide range of studies focused on phraseological aspects of learner language. However, very few have tracked the phraseological development of the same learners over an extended period of time. In this chapter, we discuss the results of an investigation of the learner phrasicon based on the Longitudinal Database of Learner English, a collection of written data produced by EFL learners over a period of three years. For our study, we made use of a subcorpus consisting of 178 texts written by 89 French-speaking learners. Each learner contributed an argumentative essay in their first year (T1) at university and another in their third year (T3) on the same topic. To assess learners’ phraseological development, we developed a methodology relying on collgrams, i.e. word bigrams that have been assigned two association scores (mutual information (MI) and t-score) on the basis of a large reference corpus. Analysis revealed a general tendency for T3 texts to contain fewer non-collocational bigrams (past people) and fewer high-scoring t-score collgrams (in particular), but more high-scoring MI collgrams (paramount importance). These results are very similar to those obtained when the same method is applied to cross-sectional data. In the conclusion, we point to some applications of the method for teaching, testing and automated scoring of learner texts.

Linguistic Polyphony

The Scandinavian Approach: ScaPoLine

Series:

Henning Nølke

Linguistic polyphony is an utterance act theory (la linguistique de l’énonciation) and is a French specialty. It deals with the numerous points of view that are likely to be communicated through an utterance. The book introduces utterance act theory and polyphony as such, but most especially focuses on the Scandinavian variant of polyphony, ScaPoLine. ScaPoLine is a formal linguistic theory whose main purpose is to specify the instructions conveyed through linguistic form for the creation of polyphonic meaning. The theoretical introduction is followed by polyphonic analyses of linguistic phenomena such as negation, mood, modality and connectors, and of textual phenomena such as represented discourse and irony. The book suggests how ScaPoLine could offer new insights within cross-linguistic and interdisciplinary studies.

Series:

Alan Cienki

Cognitive linguistics is purported to be a usage-based approach, yet only recently has research in some of its subfields turned to spontaneous spoken (versus written) language data. The collection of Alan Cienki’s Ten Lectures on Spoken Language and Gesture from the Perspective of Cognitive Linguistics considers what it means to apply different approaches from within this field to the dynamic, multimodal combination of speech and gesture.

The lectures encompass such main paradigms as blending and mental space theory, conceptual metaphor and metonymy, construction and cognitive grammars, image schemas, and mental simulation in relation to semantics. Overall, Alan Cienki shows that taking the usage-based commitment seriously with audio-visual data raises new issues and questions for theoretical models in cognitive linguistics.

The lectures for this book were given at The China International Forum on Cognitive Linguistics in May 2013.

Series:

Henning Nølke