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Maria Khotimsky

Abstract

Though translation was never a central part of Marina Cvetaeva’s work, her translations carry distinctive marks of her style and reflect important aspects of her poetics. The article brings together important scholarship on the topic and explores Cvetaeva’s evolving approach to poetry translation based on her translations into French, as well as her late translation work in the Soviet Union. Cvetaeva’s views on translation, as expressed in her correspondence, diaries, and literary essays, are summarized in the second part of the article. The article’s concluding section addresses theoretical issues and problems that arise in translating Cvetaeva’s poetry into English.

Series:

Olga Peters Hasty

Abstract

The point of departure for this chapter is Marina Cvetaeva’s rejection of the notion of influence and the idea of confluence that she conceptualizes in its stead. Though the change in verbal prefix appears slight, it in fact enables a richer approach to the variety of ways in which Cvetaeva engaged with other Russian poets and, particularly, to the impressive range of purposes that she accomplishes with these engagements. As we study how and to what end Cvetaeva effects confluences with Pushkin, Pavlova, Briusov, Blok, Achmatova, Mayakovsky, and Pasternak, we see how she uses them (in full awareness of gender bias) to shape her creative identity and to claim a place both in the culture of the time and in the Pushkinian tradition. We also appreciate the extent to which Tsvetaeva’s concept of confluence conveys essential features of her overarching definition of her art and its practitioners.

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Edited by Sander Brouwer

Questions of collective identity and nationhood dominate the memory debate in both the high and popular cultures of postsocialist Russia, Poland and Ukraine. Often the ‘Soviet’ and ‘Russian’ identity are reconstructed as identical; others remember the Soviet regime as an anonymous supranational ‘Empire’, in which both Russian and non-Russian national cultures were destroyed. At the heart of this ‘empire talk’ is a series of questions pivoting on the opposition between constructed ‘ethnic’ and ‘imperial’ identities. Did ethnic Russians constitute the core group who implemented the Soviet Terror, e.g. the mass murders of the Poles in Katyn and the Ukrainians in the Holodomor? Or were Russians themselves victims of a faceless totalitarianism? The papers in this volume explore the divergent and conflicting ways in which the Soviet regime is remembered and re-imagined in contemporary Russian, Polish and Ukrainian cinema and media.