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In: Vigiliae Christianae

Abstract

The present paper investigates the relationship between divine and human agency in teaching the Christian faith. While Christian education actually was conveyed by human beings (apostles, teachers, catechists, bishops), many authors claimed that the one and only teacher of Christianity is Jesus Christ, referring to Matt 23:8-9. By examining texts from the 2nd to the 5th century, different configurations of divine and human teaching are identified and discussed. The paper thereby highlights a crucial tension in Early and Late Antique Christianity relating to the possibilities and limitations of communicating the faith.

In: Vigiliae Christianae
Editor: Roald Dijkstra
The apostle Peter gradually became one of the most famous figures of the ancient world. His almost undisputed reputation made the disciple an exquisite anchor by which new practices within and outside the Church could be established, including innovations in fields as diverse as architecture, art, cult, epigraphy, liturgy, poetry and politics. This interdisciplinary volume inquires the way in which the figure of Peter functioned as an anchor for various people from different periods and geographical areas. The concept of Anchoring Innovation is used to investigate the history of the reception of the apostle Peter from the first century up to Charlemagne, revealing as much about Peter as about the context in which this reception took place.
The Greek historian Polybius (2nd century B.C.E.) produced an authoritative history of Rome’s rise to dominance in the Mediterranean that was explicitly designed to convey valuable lessons to future generations. But throughout this history, Polybius repeatedly emphasizes the incomparable value of first-hand, practical experience. In Polybius: Experience and the Lessons of History, Daniel Walker Moore shows how Polybius integrates these two apparently competing concepts in a way that affects not just his educational philosophy but the construction of his historical narrative. The manner in which figures such as Hannibal, Scipio Africanus, or even the Romans as a whole learn and develop over the course of Polybius’ narrative becomes a critical factor in Rome’s ultimate success.

Abstract

This paper focuses on the conservation of the lyre (chelys) of Grave 48, from the area between the so-called ‘Eriai’ Gates and the Dipylon. First, it describes the lifting of the lyre (sound box) from the ground and the recovery of the fragile plaques and fragments from the compact block of soil in the laboratory. Subsequently, it presents the extensive conservation work undertaken by the present writer and her team. Furthermore, it summarizes the conclusions of the X-Radiography and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) examinations of the sound box and the string holder and provides information about the biochemistry, structure and decay of the tortoise shell. In conclusion, the collaboration between conservator and archaeomusicologist, during the remedial conservation treatment, was of great importance, and helped with the identification of the plaques and restoration of the lyre.

In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies

Abstract

The fourteen papers delivered at a conference on Roman dance in June 2019 set about correcting the widespread idea that dance was marginal and held in low esteem in Rome. They elucidated different contexts in which dance was central, especially religion, the theatre, and private entertainments, and further topics included cultural interactions on the Italian peninsula, the diversity of practitioners, the political role of dance, and dance images in poetry. The conference showed not only that further study of Roman dance is necessary, but also that dance is a valuable tool that allows us to think about what we mean when we talk about ‘Roman’ culture.

In: Greek and Roman Musical Studies