Abstract

Whereas there is ample empirical evidence on the nature and functioning of formal and informal social protection systems in Uganda, there are limited studies on their influence on the youth living with disabilities. This paper explores the meaning and functioning of social protection strategies among youth living with spina bifida and hydrocephalous in central Uganda. Using data from in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and key informants, the paper observes that there is widespread knowledge on social protection systems among the respondents. Overall, social protection encompasses all measures implemented to address the perceived social exclusion and vulnerabilities related to the disability condition. The paper recommends a philosophical twist to the implementation of social protection by interrogating the human development model of disability which places the elements of the health conditions, impairments and their causes and consequences on the wellbeing of these vulnerable individuals at the core of the theoretical discourse.

In: The African Review

Abstract

Election is the hallmark of democracy. Any democratic regime that does not conduct election will be regarded as a dictatorship regime. The trust and reputation build up on the electoral process impedes on its credibility and public acceptability. The higher the level of trust and reputation on the electoral process, the higher the acceptability of the leaders that emerges. The electoral process in Nigeria is in a state of total relapse, confusion and quagmire. To what extent has the reputation of the electoral system made Nigerians to trust its process and output? How can Nigeria develop out of the electoral process conundrum for credible leaders to emerge in the country? Modernization theory is used to explain the rapid need for Nigeria to develop its electoral processes. The adopted methodology uses Afrobarometer time series data. The article notes that rapid growth and development are products of an electoral process that has good public trust.

In: The African Review

Abstract

The exclusion of women from politics is a historical and worldwide phenomenon. Evidently, the existing records within decision-making organs reveal significant under-representation of women. However, this state of affairs is neither natural nor unchanging. It must be noted that women suffer this political exclusion irrespective of the fact that they are demographically the majority in terms of population worldwide and in most individual countries. Tanzania is not distinct from this worldwide trend. Despite the fact that it is a signatory to several normative frameworks that seek for the inclusion of women in major decision-making organs, the actual situation is still critical. Using the public-private dichotomy, I note that the legal framework, nature of political parties, electoral system and economic position of women are central in explaining the exclusion of women from major decision organs.

In: The African Review
Negotiating Ethnic Identity in the Past and Present
Cushites in the Hebrew Bible offers a reassessment of Cushite ethnographic representations in the biblical literature as a counterpoint to misconceptions about Africa and people of African descent which are largely a feature of the modern age.
Whereas current interpretations have tended to emphasize unfavourable portraits of the people biblical writers called Cushites, Kevin Burrell illuminates the biblical perspective through a comparative assessment of ancient and modern forms of identity construction. Past and present modes of defining difference betray both similarities and differences to ethnic representations in the Hebrew Bible, providing important contexts for understanding the biblical view. This book contributes to a clearer understanding of the theological, historical, and ethnic dynamics underpinning representations of Cushites in the Hebrew Bible.

Abstract

Ethical behavior in South Africa, and consequently in the workplace, is currently a highly topical issue. Hence it was decided to investigate whether demographic differences exist regarding work ethics, in order to guide organizational decision-making and to understand work behavior in a South African sample. The sample consisted of 301 respondents, and data was collected using the Multidimensional Work Ethics Profile (MWEP), which was developed to measure seven facets of work ethics. Inferential statistical analysis was performed to analyze the dataset. The results indicate that male respondents scored higher on delay of gratification in comparison to their female counterparts. Test results for tenure found that increased years of service influenced respondents’ scores positively in hard work and delay of gratification.

In: African and Asian Studies

Abstract

Most prior research on labor market mismatch was constrained by the unavailability of data on skill mismatch and also the absence of panel data which would provide controls for unmeasured heterogeneity. This paper makes use of the panel element of Korea Labor & Income Panel Survey (KLIPS) data and identifies the wage effects of educational mismatch and skill mismatch both separately and jointly. It clearly shows that only a small proportion of the wage effect of educational mismatch is accounted for by skill mismatch, suggesting a relatively weak relation between educational mismatch and skill mismatch. In the analysis appropriate panel methodology produces much weaker estimates of the relevant coefficients than the pooled OLS model. This result indicates that unobserved individual-specific characteristics play a substantial role in the way in which mismatch effects are determined.

In: African and Asian Studies