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Abstract

As demonstrated by Benedict Anderson, media are powerful means in creating imagined community, and accordingly, mighty poles of both nationalism and cosmopolitanism. While the former gains much popularity in scholarly analysis, the latter needs to be considered as well, in understanding religious expression in present-day Indonesia, and both in particular with regard to the tensions of “nationalism” (often appeared in term of neo-tribalism and political populism) and religious transnationalism.

The present article takes Anderson’s insight and through it explores the rhetoric represented in the series of historical comic entitled Baladeva, published by Tantraz Comics Bali, Denpasar. The analysis sought inspiration from the notions of micro-cosmopolitanism and cosmopatriotism. A micro-cosmopolitanism is a cosmopolitanism from below that is concerned with freedom, openness, tolerance, and respect for difference, while cosmopatriotism is a double articulation of patriotism and cosmopolitanism that grapples with the condition of territorialism and de-territorialism in the context of postmodern society. Through those conditions and framing, the analysis might reveal the complicated meaning of cosmopolitanism, beyond the popular understanding of the celebration of being the global citizen and the transcendence of traditional and national boundaries.

Taking the last period of the Medang Kingdom (Hindu-Buddhist Mataram) as the historical context of the comic’s plot, the author consciously portrayed the glory and power of the pre-Islam, pre-colonial ‘Indonesian’ past. This narrative directly and indirectly became a critical position against the present condition of Indonesia, which is presumably Westernized, modernized, and implicitly Islamicized. Balinese socio-political and religious dynamic as the immediate context for the author is also part of the equation. Hence, the analysis might touch upon where the pressing questions of nationalism and cosmopolitanism, counter-transnational religious discourse, and religious minority are played out.

In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 30

Abstract

Spiritual experiences are related to a plethora of personal and relational outcomes. In this study, we examined if daily spiritual experiences buffer the impact of stressors on compassionate love, which is a salient aspect of personal and professional relationships. We used a smartphone-based, experience sampling method (S-ESM) to test the moderating effect of daily spiritual experiences on stressors and love in 1,691 participants, using mixed-effects multilevel regression models. Our analyses indicated that increased stressors predicted reduced attitudes of love for others while increased daily spiritual experiences were associated with greater attitudes of love. We also found that increased daily spiritual experiences over time moderated the negative effect of stressors on love. Specifically, we found that daily spiritual experiences that were higher than the individual’s average, rather than merely a higher average spiritual experience, were key to this moderating effect. Implications are discussed.

In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 30
In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 30
In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 30

Abstract

This essay aims to explain why Pope Francis hasn’t had a strong impact in Mexico. Unlike John Paul II, who had a huge charismatic impact in Mexico and a political one in the church’s visibility in the political sphere, Pope Francis did not have the same effect after his pastoral visit in 2015. This is explained because the country that he found was not similar to 20th-century Mexico. Instead, contemporary Mexico is the most Catholic country in Latin America, and does not represent the exclusive fidelity of Catholics to the church, much less the secular and anticlerical country that it represented in the 20th century. However, despite the fact that the pope visited Mexico in 2015 and that on his pastoral tour, he addressed several critical messages about the role that bishops should play, including the defense of human rights, his message has not had the desired effect for the pontiff because the clerical structure was designed by John Paul II and it does not respond to the new directions of Francis.

In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 30
In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 30
In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 30
In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 30
In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 30
In: Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 30