Mettre des mots sur l’art

Peintres et connaisseurs dans la théorie de l’art française et néerlandaise du XVIIe siècle

Jan Blanc

Painting connoisseurship

Liefhebbers in the studio

Tiarna Doherty

Pieter Bruegel’s afterlife

A visual metaphor in seventeenth-century landscape

E. Melanie Gifford

Editors Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art / Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek Online

Rembrandt print connoisseurship,

Sir Francis Seymour Haden, and the etching revival of the nineteenth century

Catherine B. Scallen

Simon Mabon

Amidst violent contestation across the Middle East leaving regimes facing – or fearing – popular protests, the regulation of political life became increasingly important. Across the past century, the development of political projects has been driven by regime efforts to maintain power, constructing regime-society relations in such a way to ensure their survival. As a consequence, security is not given; rather, it reflects the concerns of elites and embeds their concerns within society, using a range of domestic, regional and geopolitical strategies to meet their needs. These strategies play on a range of different fears and currents to locate regime interests within broader concerns. A key part of such efforts involves the cultivation and suppression of particular identities, often resulting in contestation and uncertainty within and between states. Drawing on the ideas of Giorgio Agamben, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, the article argues that the regulation of sect-based identities – and difference – has been a key part of governance strategies in divided societies across the Middle East, albeit varying across time and space.

Cheng Shaoxuan

By examining the Zhoujiatai Qin Tomb 30 Bamboo Slip End Profile Chart, one can see that the various sections of the rishu (Daybook) formed an ovular rolled bundle that was, for the most part, closed. These slips appear to have belonged to a common manuscript. However, the slips of the calendrical manuscript saliu nian ri (Days of the 36th Year) did not belong to this rolled bundle and instead were wrapped around a separate axis. On this basis, we can determine that Days of the 36th Year and the daybook were separate manuscripts when they were placed in the tomb.