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Jeffrey L. Collins and Meredith Martin

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Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Collection of Mediterranean Antiquities, Vol. 3, The Metal Objects and the Gems

Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, La collection des antiquités, Vol. 3, Les objets en métal et les gemmes

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This is the third out of eight projected volumes making available to the public the contents in the collection of Greek and Roman Antiquities in one of Canada’s most prestigious museums. Here are presented a variety of metal objects (mostly bronze figurines, medical instruments, brooches, weaponry and a lead sarcophagus), the small collection of jewelry and the ancient gems and seal stones (mainly Roman) some still set in rings. Ce volume est le troisième de la série de huit volumes projetés qui vise à publier la collection des antiquités grecques et romaines d’un des grands musées canadiens. Nous présentons ici des objets métalliques très variés (surtout des statuettes de bronze, des instruments médicaux, des épingles, des armes et un sarcophage de plomb), un petit nombre de bijoux et de gemmes anciennes (surtout romaines) certaines encore serties dans une bague.
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Kathleen G. Chapman

In Expressionism and Poster Design in Germany 1905-1925, Kathleen Chapman re-defines Expressionism by situating it in relation to the most common type of picture in public space during the Wilhelmine twentieth century, the commercial poster. Focusing equally on visual material and contemporaneous debates surrounding art, posters, and the image in general, this study reveals that conceptions of a “modern” image were characterized not so much by style or mode of production and distribution, but by a visual rhetoric designed to communicate more directly than words. As instances of such rhetoric, Expressionist art and posters emerge as equally significant examples of this modern image, demonstrating the interconnectedness of the aesthetic, the utilitarian, and the commercial in European modernism.
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Christ, Mary and the Saints

Reading Religious Subjects in Medieval and Renaissance Spain

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The last decade has witnessed a striking upsurge of interest in Iberian hagiography. In painting and the fine arts through to poetic and narrative treatments composed in Castilian and Catalan, the legacies of Christ, Mary, and the saints have been approached from a range of perspectives and subjected to detailed critical scrutiny. This book, which focuses specifically on the application of theoretical and methodological approaches to analysis, asks what scholars of early Iberian hagiography can bring to the analysis of the sacred past and how the study of the discipline can be taken forward innovatively in the future. Its fourteen essays, each focusing on a different aspect of composition, seek in particular to explore interdisciplinary methodologies and the ways in which they intersect with broader discourses in other branches of research.
Contributors are Carme Arronis Llopis, Fernando Baños Vallejo, Andrew M. Beresford, Sarah Jane Boss, Sarah V. Buxton, Marinela Garcia Sempere, Ryan D. Giles, Ariel Guiance, Lluís Ramon i Ferrer, Rebeca Sanmartín Bastida, Connie L. Scarborough, and Lesley K. Twomey.
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At least initially, we impute clear constructions of identity to religious symbols and assume that they distinguish self and other from one another explicitly. But perceptions of alterity too play a vital role in sacral forms of representation.
This volume, therefore, is devoted first to the question: What is the function of the characteristic traits of alterity in the sacral context? Utilized in semantics of the extraordinary, of the exceptional, which characterizes the sacral, were markers of foreignness; perceptions of difference were capable of endowing with expression the remoteness of the sacral from the profane world of experience. Secondly, the book raises the question: How are various concepts of the sacred synthesized in translation situations, for instance in the context of missionary activity? How did an artifact arrive at sacral potency in various cultures, and under which conditions did semantic displacement occur?
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Making Copies in European Art 1400-1600

Shifting Tastes, Modes of Transmission, and Changing Contexts

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In Making Copies in European Art 1400-1600, Maddalena Bellavitis collects 16 essays by significant scholars, who have explored in their research diverse aspects of the artistic process and the motivations behind the creation of copies after important Renaissance works of art. The essays underline the binds and exchanges between different contexts or artistic techniques that copies can establish. They concern principal artists of different artistic environments, and analyze which were the characteristics, iconographies and elements that copyists, collectors and donors focused on, and the several ways chosen to reproduce them. Still unpublished or unstudied paintings and documentation, intriguing iconographies and reconstructions of lost itineraries covered by works and their copies, augment this volume’s public and institutional appeal.