Abstract

This paper aims to understand the welfare mix in Korea by examining its historical origins and tracing its evolution during Japanese colonial rule. After locating the origins of the welfare mix in the early Chosŏn Dynasty, this study examines the evolution of the welfare mix in Korea under Japanese colonial rule. By focusing on repressiveness and recognition, the dual aspects of Japanese colonial rule, we reveal a traditional aspect of the Korean welfare mix that remained strong and was, paradoxically, reinforced under Japanese colonial rule. Following the establishment of a colonial centralised state, Japanese attempts to impose modern dispensational welfare systems proved inadequate. The Japanese were forced to return to traditional, informal welfare providers, such as kyes, to satisfy Chosŏn’s need for welfare. The paper concludes by arguing that this welfare mix can help to explain the welfare regime in modern Korea.

In: African and Asian Studies

Abstract

This is a cross-sectional study that explores the effects of acculturation attitudes on the health-promoting behaviors of international students in Isparta, Turkey. The study was carried out in eight departments at Suleyman Demirel University. The sample comprised 138 students. The data were collected using three forms: the Data Form, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile (HPLP) scale, and the Acculturation Attitudes Scale. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation between the mean HPLP scores and the mean acculturation attitude scores (r=0.321, p<0.001). It is important for health professionals working with international students to understand the interactions between acculturation attitude and health-promoting behavior.

In: African and Asian Studies

Abstract

This study uses an augmented dynamic gravity model to identify the main contributing factors influencing bilateral trade between China and 46 African countries in general and to test whether Sino-Africa bilateral trade is more than resource focused in particular. Natural resource was captured by “oil exports” and “ores & metal exports,” and the empirical analysis verifies only “oil” not “ores & metals” to significantly influence the growing Sino-Africa bilateral trade. Thus, the empirical result partially supports the widely held view that natural resources are critical to bilateral trade between China and African countries. However, it is not true that Chinese engagement in Africa is exclusively due to natural resources as always portrayed. Apart from the oil factor, some other significant factors for the growing bilateral trade are identified. The study indicates there is a huge opportunity and potential for rapid expansion of Sino-Africa bilateral trade that is mutually beneficial.

In: African and Asian Studies

Abstract

Over a considerable period of time, China has formulated a series of press freedom principles and guidelines for practice. These have their own distinctive features. China has also established its own legal system to regulate press freedom. By using the methods of literature analysis, text analysis, historical analysis and induction methods, this paper studies the origin, spiritual essence and core content of China’s press freedom. In addition, the current general framework and functions of China’s press laws, as well as the significance of press legislation, are discussed. The study finds that although China has established a relatively complete legal framework to govern the press, but with the rapid development of China’s social economy, the problems facing news dissemination will be more and more, the promulgation of specialized laws remains necessary and inevitable in the realization of the supervision of the press control. China needs to establish a perfect news law as soon as possible.

In: African and Asian Studies

Abstract

Indeed, intellectual property rights are not new to traditional African communities. Traditional legal systems of protection in Africa such as customary law protected the rights of members of these communities. These systems of protection are still used. There are also practices of monopoly from the past regarding the use of some products of creative works. This paper examines the various ways in which traditional intellectual properties have been protected over the years which are similar in some ways to modern intellectual property rights. Thus, proposing that the adoption of a pluralistic protection mechanism (legal pluralism) for traditional intellectual properties could resolve legal issues related to them in Africa.

In: African Journal of Legal Studies

Abstract

Men and women have different health profiles which necessitate different health needs, as a result of their biology and their distinct status in society. Discrimination and harmful traditional practices in many societies in the global south further affect the reproductive health of indigenous women. The paper will highlight discrimination against women in patriarchal indigenous communities in Cameroon. The paper focuses on violations that affect women’s reproductive health. The paper will discuss these violations in light of the country’s commitment to Sustainable Development Goal No. 3 on good health and well-being and Goal No. 5 on gender equality. The paper will also highlight the national and international laws addressing the right to the reproductive health of indigenous women. It will also examine gender-sensitive interventions, legislation and policies put in place by the indigenous community and the Government of Cameroon if any. The paper will end with conclusion and suggestions/recommendations on ways to improve the reproductive health of indigenous women in Cameroon.

In: African Journal of Legal Studies

Abstract

This paper examines the role of Internet Service Providers as bridges and intermediaries between private persons, organizations even government arms and the Internet and the liabilities placed on them by the law with regard to wrongful acts of their subscribers or clients under the laws of Nigeria. It is common knowledge that actions againstISPs are commonest with defamation and infringement of copyright. The legal framework in theUSand the UKare examined to determine if there are lessons to learn for Nigeria. The Nigerian legal framework also places some responsibilities on ISPs with regard to crime prevention and prosecution. This is because private rights are not yet much of an issue in the Nigerian cyberspace. The paper points out that much of the regulation governingISPs liability in respect of civil matters do not have legislative power but are mere guidelines and suggests that theUSand UKpatterns have a lot to offer Nigeria.

In: African Journal of Legal Studies

Abstract

The 2018 Petroleum Host and Impacted Communities Development Trust Bill before the Nigerian National Assembly was proposed to foster sustainable development (SD) and embed corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the oil and gas corporate activities within host communities. From the backdrop of SD and CSR as regulatory concepts, this article scrutinizes the Bill for its viability to realize its objectives in its current form. It raises concerns about: (i) perceived negligence by the government to provide social services and public goods, seeming to outsource such responsibilities to the business community; (ii) the reduction of CSR to capital or community development projects; and (iii) the absence of useful delimitation criteria to determine host and impacted communities. The article argues that past mistakes are being rehashed and queries the capacity of the Bill to live up to stakeholders’ expectations. Using the normative contributions of global templates such as the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, the article recommends policy and regulatory changes to the Bill’s governance structure towards embedding effective CSR and engendering SD in the Nigerian oil and gas industry.

In: African Journal of Legal Studies
In: African Diaspora

Abstract

This essay attempts to chart the career of the concept of ‘Africanisms’ in the anthropology and history of the African Diaspora in the Americas. After surveying the origins of the concept, I focus on the role of Melville J. Herskovits’ highly influential mobilisation of the concept, its major mid-20th century critiques, and a highly influential late 20th century reaction to the terms of these debates. I will conclude by indicating how Africanist historians have come to repurpose this concept around the turn of the millennium, and how more recent scholarship might indicate the end of its usefulness as an analytical category.

In: African Diaspora