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Abstract

The present article investigates the role of Descartes’ doctrine of continuous creation in Jean-Luc Nancy’s philosophy. While it is not customary to take Descartes as a thinker of plurality, his doctrine of continuous creation affords Nancy the philosophical resources for thinking the plurality of worlds. In the first section of the article, we present Descartes’ argument for continuous creation, in accordance with which creation occurs not just once but is repeated at each instant. Yet, in Descartes, this doctrine remains wedded to a concept of an immutable creator. In the second section of the article, we present the stakes of Nancy’s deconstruction of creation ex nihilo, which results in the suspension of God as an immutable ground. For Nancy, creation of the world happens at each moment of the world but without a pre-determined end or plan.

In: KronoScope
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Author: Robert Sadykov

Abstract

Several physical concepts, including the concept of time, are clarified herein by taking into account existing experimental data. In addition, the missing links among these physical concepts are established. This allows us to take another step towards understanding the physical nature of time.

In: KronoScope
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Author: Matias Slavov

Abstract

McTaggart famously introduced the A- and B-series as rival metaphysical accounts of time. This paper shall reorient the debate over the original distinction. Instead of treating the series as competing theories about the nature of time, it will be argued that they are different viewpoints on a world that is fundamentally physical. To that end, non-reductive physicalism is proposed to reconcile the series.

In: KronoScope
In: KronoScope

Abstract

In this essay I discuss the various ways time can be inscribed in texts below the level of explicit propositions about time. I argue that a full chronographical analysis needs to account for the dimensions of the theoretical, the practical, and the aesthetic. Taking Kant’s table of categories as a guide to the fundamental functions of chronographic determination, I propose a methodology of analysis that goes beyond the aspect of quantitative measurement, and includes typological, thetic and modal information about time. Numerous examples from various textual domains such as poetry, historiography, science and law illustrate the wide applicability of the proposed analytical categories. The full matrix of dimensions and determinative functions can be used to describe the chronographic signature of a text, which depends as much on its communicative purpose as on the technologies of calculating and describing time available to its authors.

In: KronoScope