Abstract

When investigating the internal phylogeny of a language family like Indo-European, the value of loanwords is often understated or completely neglected. It may be argued that a loanword shared exclusively by several languages is an important shared innovation when this lexeme can be traced to a common reconstructed form. Such a shared innovation may carry even more significance than one based on inherited lexical material. In the latter case, it is often hard to distinguish innovations from archaisms. This article examines two lexemes that may have been borrowed into the proto-language of the hypothesized Balkan Indo-European subgroup including at least Greek, Armenian, Albanian, and Phrygian. If the proposed etymologies are accepted, they will contribute to the already existing evidence for this subgroup, which hitherto has not been universally accepted.

In: Dispersals and Diversification

Abstract

Ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis was employed to obtain information on the population relationships of the two Thulamela individuals (AD 1400-1700) and six other skeletons from various archaeological sites of the southern African Iron Age – Tuli (Botswana), Nwanetsi, Makgope, Happy Rest and Stayt. Although sequences were short, it seems that the Thulamela female aligns somewhat more with eastern populations as opposed to the male who aligns more with western groups. This result is not surprising given that the two individuals were buried at the same site but their burials were hundreds of years apart. It was also possible to identify genetic links between the Iron Age individuals and modern southern African populations (e.g. some of the skeletons assessed showed maternal genetic similarities to present-day Sotho/Tswana groups) and to separate the samples into at least two genetic groups. Poor quality and quantity of DNA meant that only haplogroups, not subhaplogroups, of the individuals could be traced.

In: Journal of African Archaeology
In: China's Old Churches
In: China's Old Churches
In: China's Old Churches
In: China's Old Churches
In: China's Old Churches
In: China's Old Churches

Abstract

Current potters in Manaledi village in the Tswapong Hills of Botswana aver that they and their ancestors for five generations have made pottery exclusively with clay from nearby sources. We begin with an examination of Manaledi and its clay mine to uncover current dialectics between village, landscape, clay, potters, and ancestors. Archaeological sherds found around the village and clay sources document occupation by makers of Early Iron Age (ca. AD 500-750), Middle Iron Age (ca. AD 750-1050), Late Iron Age (ca. AD 1420-1800), and 18th-20th century wares related to current Manaledi pottery. The proximity of archaeological deposits, clay sources, and village made it possible to conduct simultaneously what might otherwise be considered three separate projects. As a consequence, we are able to document that Manaledi clays have been used to make pottery for some 1500 years and to consider long-standing constraints on potting this implies.

In: Journal of African Archaeology