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Sovereignty and the Constitution

The Development of Pakistan’s Grundnorm

Yaqoob Khan Bangash

The constitution of a country is the supreme national institution, and its provisions significantly affect the development of politics and society. The process of constitution making is key for understanding the constitution, and an assessment of the process makes possible a better and deeper understanding of the workings of the country, its politics, economy, and polity. The discussion of Islamic constitutionalism has recently gained momentum, especially in the wake of a reorganization of the Middle East and the Arab Spring. This paper focuses on the development of the first “Islamic” constitution, that of Pakistan, and analyzes the issues and problems it faced. It focuses on the issue of sovereignty, a concept underlying modern democracy, and uses the debates of the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan during the critical debate on the Objectives Resolution, in March 1949. The experience of Pakistan is seminal, as we historically understand and currently assess the issues of Islam, democracy, and the modern nation state.

The Codification of Islamic Criminal Law in the Sudan

Penal Codes and Supreme Court Case Law under Numayrī and Bashīr

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Olaf Köndgen

In The Codification of Islamic Criminal Law in the Sudan, Olaf Köndgen offers an in-depth analysis of the Sudan’s Islamized penal codes of 1983 and 1991, their historical, political, and juridical context, their interpretation in the case law of the Supreme Court, and their practical application. He examines issues that arise in sharīʿa criminal law, including homicide, bodily harm, unlawful sexual intercourse ( zinā, liwāṭ), rape, unfounded accusation of unlawful sexual intercourse ( qadhf), highway robbery ( ḥirāba), apostasy ( ridda), and alcohol consumption.

Drawing on a wide range of primary and secondary sources, a large number of previously untapped Supreme Court cases, and interviews with judges and politicians, Köndgen convincingly explains the multiple contradictions and often surprising aspects of one of the Arab world’s longest lasting applications of codified sharīʿa criminal law.

Olaf Köndgen won the DAVO Dissertation Prize 2014 for his Ph.D. thesis.

"This extremely well-documented study represents a milestone for the discussion of Islamic criminal law in the Muslim world as a whole and in the Sudan especially. Olaf Köndgen fills an academic void; his work deserves the greatest recognition, for its extraordinary quality, its thoroughness and systematic approach."
Prof. Günter Meyer, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz

Dār al-islām / dār al-ḥarb

Territories, People, Identities

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Edited by Giovanna Calasso and Giuliano Lancioni

This is the first collection of studies entirely devoted to the terminological pair dār al-islām / dar al-ḥarb, “the abode of Islam” and “the abode of war”, apparently widely known as representative of “the Islamic vision” of the world, but in fact almost unexplored. A team of specialists in different fields of Islamic studies investigates the issue in its historical and conceptual origins as well as in its reception within the different genres of Muslim written production. In contrast to the fixed and permanent categories they are currently identified with, the multifaceted character of these two notions and their shifting meanings is set out through the analysis of a wide range of contexts and sources, from the middle ages up to modern times.

Contributors are Francisco Apellániz, Michel Balivet, Giovanna Calasso, Alessandro Cancian, Éric Chaumont, Roberta Denaro, Maribel Fierro, Chiara Formichi, Yohanan Friedmann, Giuliano Lancioni, Yaacov Lev, Nicola Melis, Luis Molina, Antonino Pellitteri, Camille Rhoné-Quer, Francesca Romana Romani, Biancamaria Scarcia Amoretti, Roberto Tottoli, Raoul Villano, Eleonora Di Vincenzo and Francesco Zappa.

Politics of Honor in Ottoman Anatolia

Sexual Violence and Socio-Legal Surveillance in the Eighteenth Century

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Başak Tuğ

In Politics of Honor, Başak Tuğ examines moral and gender order through the glance of legal litigations and petitions in mid-eighteenth century Anatolia. By juxtaposing the Anatolian petitionary registers, subjects’ petitions, and Ankara and Bursa court records, she analyzes the institutional framework of legal scrutiny of sexual order. Through a revisionist interpretation, Tuğ demonstrates that a more bureaucratized system of petitioning, a farther hierarchically organized judicial review mechanism, and a more centrally organized penal system of the mid-eighteenth century reinforced the existing mechanisms of social surveillance by the community and the co-existing “discretionary authority” of the Ottoman state over sexual crimes to overcome imperial anxieties about provincial “disorder”.