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Clementine Monro

Abstract

Perpetual Transitions is a practice-based research project that investigates how absence is observed through the spatial experience of the architectural ruin and the communication of that experience through the medium of photography. It is addressed through an experiential study and photographic response to the Georgian ruin of Nettleham Hall, England. The word ruin has its origins from the notion of ‘falling or fallen stones.’1 In this context, ruins are seen as the fragmented remains of man-made architecture. In experiencing the ruin of Nettleham Hall within its present state, absence has the capacity to embody lived space and ephemerality of the ruin. The photographic response as an experiential inquiry is key to the communication of absence and the phenomenologically experienced ruin. The capacity of photography to communicate time, duration and the ephemeral mediates a visual trace and expression of the felt experience of absence. My questions of how is absence felt and experienced within the ruin, and how does one communicate absence through photography, seek to connect and then transfer the felt experience of the ruin into an art piece that addresses absence and spatial experience.

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Nycole Prowse

Abstract

This section begins with an analysis of the leaky representations of time, space and the body in drug literature. It is selected as the opening chapter of this section because of its theoretical approach, as well as the thematic focus of the way in which interventions upon the body (via the drug trope) are reflective of the way the body is inhabited by and inhabits space. For this examination, this chapter utilises Elizabeth Grosz’s understanding of how bodies live and are positioned as spatio-temporal beings. Grosz suggests that ‘…in order to reconceive bodies, and to understand the kinds of active interrelations possible between (lived) representations of the body and (theoretical) representations of space and time, the bodies of each sex need to be accorded the possibility of a different space-time framework’. This chapter proposes that drug literature provides a platform where alternative corporeal possibilities can be played out. In the literary sphere the drug trope reframes spatial and temporal regulatory notions of the body. The drug metaphor disrupts temporal linearity through the reconfiguration of junk time. Likewise, landscapes, cityscapes and a sense of place are re-imagined in fluid, drugged dreamscapes.

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Shelley Smith and Nicolai Steinø

Abstract

Urban public space in a Western context has become increasingly functionalised and pre-determined. Designations for use and by who, have become more prolific and have introduced formalised codes of accepted behaviour. This represents a barrier to the appropriation of public space by citizens, particularly when it comes to less conventional cultural practices. This in turn becomes a barrier for both inclusion and how space is defined and conceptualised. This is problematic in a notion of public space as the space of exchange and meeting place of ‘the other,’ and as an essential part of building an inclusive, tolerant and stimulating urbanity. In this regard, architecture, design and urban planning are neither innocent nor neutral agents in the process of conceptualising, interpreting and materialising space. Design has the capacity to foster uniformity and unambiguity or to invite plurality and ambivalence. Activating the physical practice of parkour, this chapter takes its point of departure in alternative urban practices to discuss the role of architecture, urban design and planning in materialising space between segregation and intolerance on the one hand and inclusion and curiosity on the other and the degree to which space is appropriated as place. Focussing on material details for jumping and climbing, as well as the overall spatial structure for trajectory, parkour emphasises the background and the foreground, while architectural urban space focuses on the middle ground. This chapter examines this potential and its implications for an urban architectural practice aiming for plurality and ambivalence, rather than uniformity and unambiguity. Further, in the context of this publication which intends a more permanent record of the dialogues and interweavings created by the papers presented at the 4th Global Conference on Time, Space and the Body in 2014, this chapter will draw out some of the points that demarcate potential meetings with the other chapters in this section.

Series:

Burcu Baykan

Abstract

This chapter explores the respatialisation of the embodied experience of space through the French multimedia and performance artist Orlan’s body and identity altering practices. By primarily focusing on the artist’s multifaceted surgery-performance series, The Reincarnation of Saint Orlan (1990–1993) and her subsequent series of digital self-portraits, Self-Hybridizations (1998–2007), this chapter traces the complex relationships between the human and the non-human domains that appear in her work, as well as the mutating, in-between bodily space that is configured within these meetings and crossovers. Thus, the main intent of this chapter is to engage with and explore these dynamic, unstable and transient states of being that Orlan’s work reflects; the metamorphic, in-between areas related to the understanding of self in ontological, philosophical and artistic sense. The investigation undertaken here for this purpose primarily draws on Deleuze and Guattari’s formulation of the body through their theory of becoming-other.

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Katerina Mojanchevska

Abstract

The decades of transformation from government to governance have increasingly been about redistributing political power and citizens’ participation in decision-making processes, both on national and local levels. The rationale behind this institutional redesign is the benefit of direct participation of those affected in the decision-making process. In the more immediate relationship with the citizens and the more fragmented sources of power, cities are able to democratise the public space from below and include diverse publics (and not only those skilled and vocal in their claims) into deliberation over redistributive process of public goods. Various theories of policy-making seek to encapsulate the new relation between the citizen(s) and the institutions, such as: collaborative policy-making,1 communicative planning,2 the Just City approach,3 multicultural planning,4 to name but a few. While being quite distinctive and drawing inspiration from different disciplines, they share some common features, such as disappointment with technocratic planning and beliefs that the civil society and self-organised citizens’ groups are the key to social transformation and empowerment of groups outside (and sometimes against) the state.5 Yet, there are serious challenges in meeting these objectives. Andrea Cornwall and Vera Coelho note that widening participation is more than ‘invitations to participate’ and ‘for people to be able to exercise their political agency, they need first to recognise themselves as citizens rather than as beneficiaries or clients.’6 In advocating participatory approaches that operate beyond representational democracy and voicing the perspectives of different social groups in respective bodies and spaces, this chapter studies if and in which ways do self-organised citizens’ groups shift the power balance in urban and social making of cities and if the control over public planning process is real or symbolic. The research is based on qualitative methodology and is limited to the city of Skopje, Macedonia and its neighbourhoods.

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Anthi Kosma

Abstract

This chapter attempts to compose a collage between memories of events from a personal experience of the author and the references that other authors contribute to describe drawing as action, a ‘gesture’ through which the body externalises itself. Drawing is described as an action of coming-into-presence, which means presence before signification. It is also defined as a non-representative art where the form is not the traced figures but the body as a form by itself, the body as generator of space. Four short narratives are used in a phenomenological approximation to describe body from an inside point of view where spacing by trace is experienced. The act of making traces appears out of intimacy and exteriorises – through a dynamic and diagrammatic kind of writing – aspects of the abyss of oneself in a process where ‘every time is a singular time.’1 Drawings are ruins, testimonies of these moments, moulds of the gestures that traced them. The experience of drawing is also ‘an interior matter,’ an experience that disappears when the action stops and a performing art begins, which is always accompanied by images in ‘a phantasmatic dance.’2 If contemporary drawing is defined by Alain Badiou as a ‘description without a place,’3 this chapter looks forward by describing events where space is presented in its formation as an out of place description. ‘Out of place’ because drawing is not perceived or not concerned as a given, available or formed form. On the contrary, it is the gift, invention, uprising or the birth of form.

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Ana Carolina Lima e Ferreira

Abstract

Rio is a contrast of beautiful landscapes and seaside dreams and violence, danger and lack of infrastructure. It is a city where people suffer from inequalities. The Theatre of the Oppressed created by Augusto Boal (1931–2009) is an initiative crossing physical and cultural boundaries, giving voice to people and allowing urban transformation. This method was developed when he was exiled during the Brazilian Dictatorship. In the 1980s Boal returned to Brazil and in the 1990s he was elected a city councillor in Rio de Janeiro. His ‘Legislative Theatre’ created a platform where many suggestions were received from the people to formulate new and coherent projects of law. With public participation, ideas were collected and transformed into Boalian theatre interventions in public spaces. Through this approach, Boal implemented fifteen city laws and two national laws. Nowadays the people of Rio are still suffering due to urban transformation. The theatre group, however, still continues their actions by democratising cultural products providing possibilities to activate and strengthen the citizenship. They still believe in the importance of implementing projects, activating participation and turning the oppressed into protagonists – creating a dialogue through aesthetic media. Art reframes urban intervention into public art pieces; theatrical participation into empowering performance; and the work of community leaders into a process for urban change.

BLAST at 100

A Modernist Magazine Reconsidered

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Edited by Philip Coleman, Kathryn Milligan and Nathan O'Donnell

BLAST at 100 makes an original contribution to the understanding of a major modernist magazine. Providing new critical readings that consider the magazine’s influence within contexts that have not been acknowledged before – in the development of Irish and Spanish literature and culture in the twentieth century, for example, as well as in the areas of cultural studies, performance studies and the scholarship of teaching and learning – BLAST at 100 reconsiders the magazine’s complex legacy. In addition to situating the magazine in new and often unexpected contexts, BLAST at 100 also offers important new insights into the work of some of its most significant contributors, including Wyndham Lewis, Ezra Pound, and Rebecca West.

Contributors are: Philip Coleman, Simon Cutts, Andrzej Gąsiorek, Angela Griffith, Nicholas E. Johnson, Kathryn Laing, Christopher Lewis, J.C.C. Mays, Kathryn Milligan, Yolanda Morató, Nathan O’Donnell, Alex Runchman, Colm Summers, Tom Walker