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Edited by European Centre for Minority Issues and The European Academy Bozen/Bolzano

The European Yearbook of Minority Issues provides a critical and timely review of contemporary developments in minority-majority relations in Europe. It combines analysis, commentary and documentation in relation to conflict management, international legal developments and domestic legislation affecting minorities in Europe.
Part I contains scholarly articles and, in 2002/3, features two special focus sections (‘Belgium' and 'New Minorities’), accompanied by a miscellaneous articles section.
Part II reviews the implementation of minority legislation and international standards at the universal and regional levels as well as new developments in relation to them and contains a list of international norms.
Apart from providing a unique annual overview of minority issues for both scholars and practitioners in this field, the Yearbook will be an indispensable reference tool for libraries, research institutes as well as governments and international organisations.

Series:

Edited by Jan Niessen and Isabelle Chopin

Europe has come a long way at least in the institutional response to racism. This book describes the responses of the Council of Europe and the European Union to the worrying trends of racism and xenophobia in the 1990s, and considers the prospects for combating discrimination in Europe using tools that have emerged as a result. Part one looks at the evolution of the Council of Europe apparatus to combat discrimination and the anti-discrimination standards prescribed by its institutions. Part two considers the legislative measures recently adopted by the European Union. The contributions in Part three take a comparative perspective of all measures adopted at European level to combat racial and ethnic discrimination.

Edited by Nazila Ghanea

The themes and issues explored in this book - religion, human rights, politics and society could not be more relevant to the post 11 September 2001 world. They lie at the heart of global political debate today.
The collection explores these issues after the passing of just over two decades from the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of all Forms of Intolerance and Discrimination based on Religion or Belief. That declaration set out minimum international standards for the elimination of such discrimination. Sadly the challenge of intolerance on the basis of religion or belief continues to plague us, and tackling it seems to have become increasingly entrenched.
The complexity of this phenomenon requires expertise from different quarters. This collection draws from diplomatic, activist and theological quarters and benefits from the analysis of scholars of law, history, religious studies and sociology.
The ten chapters of this collection examine the relationship between human rights, law and religion; offer a typology for the study of religious persecution; problematise the consequences flowing from religious establishment in religiously plural society; analyse the implications of the directions being taken by the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights and the protections offered by the European Commission council Directive 2000/43/EC outlawing workplace discrimination; study the 1981 Declaration and its promotion through the work of the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion or Belief; and explore the intricacies of this freedom in detail from within the context of the United Kingdom and The Netherlands.

Nazila Ghanea-Hercock

This book provides the first comprehensive assessment of the contribution of the United Nations to the human rights situation of the Bahá’ís in Iran. It does this by examining the theoretical, legal, institutional and political dimensions of this issue in detail.

The situation of the Bahá’í community in Iran between 1979 and 2002 provides a particularly good test case for the international community due to its clarity. By giving attention to a singular case within a discrete time frame, this book is able to effectively examine the impact of UN human rights protection. Attention is given in this study to the clash between religion and human rights, the protection of freedom of religion or belief in international law, the workings of UN human rights charter-based and treaty bodies and their various mechanisms, and recommendations for the resolution of the Bahá’í human rights situation in Iran.

Responding to the Human Rights Deficit

Essays in Honour of Bas de Gaay Fortman

Edited by Paschal Mihyo and Karin Arts

Despite the existence of a wide range of human rights instruments and procedures, human rights violations still abound. The authors of this book address this so-called human rights deficit, and the possible responses to it, from various disciplinary angles and mostly in the context of development. They explore the reasons for the continuation of economic, social and/or political exclusion and human rights violations at large. They also present keys for redressing the human rights deficit. The role of law, and questions of universality, inclusion and exclusion are central themes in this book. The need to take up civil and political rights and economic social and cultural rights on equal footing is recognized by several of the authors, and so is that of bridging the public-private divide. Specific contributions address among others the importance of human rights training and education, the role of NGO's in a globalizing world, minorities, gender and women's rights, accountability of multinational corporations, and the problem of human trafficking.

Series:

Edited by European Centre for Minority Issues and The European Academy Bozen/Bolzano

The European Yearbook of Minority Issues provides a critical and timely review of contemporary developments in minority-majority relations in Europe. It combines analysis, commentary and documentation in relation to conflict management, international legal developments and domestic legislation affecting minorities in Europe.

Part I contains scholarly articles and, in 2001/2, features three special focus sections (‘Minority Rights as a New Regime of Multilevel Governance in Europe’, ‘Non-Discrimination’ and ‘Complex Power-Sharing Arrangements as a Means of Overcoming Self-Determination Disputes’), accompanied by a miscellaneous articles section.

Part II reviews the implementation of minority legislation and international standards at the universal and regional levels as well as new developments in relation to them and contains a chronology of events.

Apart from providing a unique annual overview of minority issues for both scholars and practitioners in this field, the Yearbook will be an indispensable reference tool for libraries, research institutes as well as governments and international organisations.

Forging a Singaporean Statehood: 1965-1995

The Contribution of Japan

Series:

Robin Ramcharan

This work takes an in-depth look at the muli-faceted contemporary relationship between Singapore and Japan since the end of World War II. It is the story of a relationship between an economic superpower, Japan, and an enterprising city-state whose leaders have sought to emulate not only Japan's economic success but several key facets of Japanese society as well. No other country surpasses Singapore in its public admiration of Japan. How is it possible for a multi-ethnic Singapore to emulate a relatively homogeneous Japan? What features of economic and political motives behind the attempt to emulate Japan? These and other questions are adressed in this work, which will be of interest to scholars of the international relations and security of East and Southeast Asia.

Series:

Edited by Ferdinand J.M. Feldbrugge

The states of Central and Eastern Europe have, to different extents and with varying levels of success, engaged in the transition from authoritarian rule. The (re-) construction of democratic, law-based governance has turned out to be a lengthy and - at times - frustrating process. The agenda for post-communist reform contains many entries, yet a transition-blue-print is not available.
The papers collected in this volume explore the implications of the transition process in various areas. While not all aspects of post-communist law are covered, several crucial issues receive an in-depth treatment. These are: the development of (supra-) governmental systems, the procuracy, minority rights, contract law, land ownership and industrial property rights. Displaying remarkable scholarly as well as practical legal expertise, the various contributors to this volume illustrate the problems in, and the potential of, these policy areas.

Justice Pending: Indigenous Peoples and Other Good Causes

Essays in Honour of Erica-Irene A. Daes

Series:

Edited by Gudmundur Alfredsson and Maria Stavropoulou

The articles in this volume deal with many of the issues, which have been and continue to be on the international law and human rights agenda of Erica-Irene A. Daes. She is an international personality, with a long and varied career, but she has been and is passionately involved in a wide range of issues related directly or indirectly to the Greek experience and the Greek diaspora.
The energy and output of Erica Daes culminated in her tireless efforts to seek protection for the world's indigenous peoples. It is in this capacity that the international human rights community has best learned to know and appreciate her. As an independent expert, she has served as Chairman of the Working Group on Indigenous Populations and she has carried out studies on indigenous land rights, intellectual and cultural rights, and indigenous heritage. She played a key role in bringing about an international year (1993) and a decade (1995-2004) for the promotion of the rights of indigenous peoples.
Most importantly, Erica Daes was the principal drafter of the UN draft declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples, which has become known as the Daes Declaration and which is reproduced in an annex to this book. Other annexes contain excerpts from her documents prepared in the context of her UN career, some of which have not been previously published.

EC Law and Minority Language Policy

Culture, Citizenship and Fundamental Rights

Niamh Nic Shuibhne

The European Community has pledged respect for the cultural and linguistic diversity of its Member States and has recognized minority languages as an inherent constituent in this regard. This development reflects a broader trend within the Community towards grappling with less obvious aspects of supranational governance. Minority language groups turn optimistically to `Europe' in response.
But, despite rhetorical promises, just what can the EC actually be expected to do in the realm of minority language protection, a politically sensitive and traditionally domestic concern?
Arguments put forward to date focus primarily on philosophical, moral, economic, and political discourse. While these considerations are a vital aspect of the debate on minority languages and on linguistic diversity more generally, the question of legal basis remains largely unanswered.
For the first time, this book traces comprehensively the existence of an appropriate legal basis for action undertaken by the EC in this domain, striving in particular to locate a pragmatic yet effective balance between legitimate possibility and acceptable limitations.