Browse results

In: Quaerendo

Abstract

During the twentieth century, a limited edition is usually numbered, in contrast to limited editions of around 1800. This article examines a number of turning points in the history of limitation statements and copy numbering: the disappearance of copyright related numbering versus unnumbered editions of private presses (around 1800), the advent of numbered prints (1850-1900), and numbering of luxury editions and private press editions (1880-1910). The stabilization of a new tradition of numbering occurs around 1930. The development of private press publications is examined in a broad context of copyright and the production of prints, while practices in the English-speaking world are shown to differ from those in other cultures, such as the Netherlands, Belgium, France and Germany.

In: Quaerendo
In: Quaerendo

Abstract

Following the rise of the study of the history of the book in the 1980s and 1990s, provenance studies have become an important component in the research of social and cultural historians. This development was noticed and embraced by the Consortium of European Research Libraries (CERL). The Consortium incorporated results of provenance research in existing resources and created new resources specifically with the question of provenance in mind. In this contribution I will focus on two CERL resources: the Material Evidence in Incunabula Database and the recently developed CERL Provenance Digital Archive and the relation between the two. Examples will show how these two digital resources stimulate international cooperation in the field of provenance research.

In: Quaerendo

Abstract

In this article, we show the importance of both social and economic imperatives for authors and printers active in the genre of wedding poetry, and the interaction between these imperatives. The lack of systematic evidence and the fragmented nature of previous research has led to the dominance of tentative interpretations in studies of wedding poetry. Necessary, therefore, is a broader and more inclusive approach of the genre as a whole. We have thus combined a literature review with a quantitative analysis, exploring metadata of over 3,500 publications of wedding poetry (year of publication, names of brides, grooms, printers and authors) in the Dutch Republic between 1600-1760.

In: Quaerendo

Abstract

There is compelling evidence of the use by the booktrade from the late fifteenth to the early nineteenth centuries of partly-completed sewn bindings with permanent structures, with or without boards, but without permanent covers. They allowed books to be held together as they went through the booktrade, added little extra weight and would have been relatively inexpensive. Evidence for their use can be found in archival sources, trade regulations and depictions in art, but mostly in the 82 sewn bookblocks without boards that have so far been recorded. They can be identified by a careful examination of their various and varied physical features, which present a complex variety of options. The survival of composite volumes raises the question of who commissioned the bindings. What is not in doubt, however, is that they were an established feature of the booktrade, though the extent to which they were used is as yet unknown.

In: Quaerendo
Author: Jane Tappuni

This article assesses the opportunities for the publishing industry to utilize blockchain technologies to improve current processes in the book and journal publishing communities. It explains blockchain as a concept and then outlines scenarios and examples where blockchain could be used or is already being used in publishing. The article outlines opportunities that blockchain presents for new business models and the areas of revenue distribution, contract, rights, and royalties, and potential improvements it could bring to the supply chain of content via better workflow, sales, production, and collaboration processes.

In: Logos
In: Logos
In: Logos
Author: Hans M. Zell

This is the second instalment of a two-part article. Part 1 of this article appeared in Logos, 30 (3). Part 2 sets out a number of suggestions to strengthen the book industries in Africa, and the way forward, especially on capacity- and skills-building; training for book industry personnel; strengthening book professional associations, South–South linkages, and knowledge-sharing; encouraging international collaboration; the need for ongoing research and documentation; African books in the global marketplace; and the important but still neglected area of publishing in African indigenous languages. An Appendix provides a summary of the International Publishers Association (IPA) and Association for the Development of Education in Africa (ADEA) meetings on the African book industry, held in Nairobi in June 2019, together with links to a number of articles, reports, and press statements about the meetings.

In: Logos