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In: The Oasis of Bukhara, Volume 1
In: The Oasis of Bukhara, Volume 1
In: The Oasis of Bukhara, Volume 1
In: The Oasis of Bukhara, Volume 1
In: The Oasis of Bukhara, Volume 1
In: The Oasis of Bukhara, Volume 1
Exhibiting Material Culture in Tunisia (1881-2016)
This book documents and interprets the trajectory of ethnographic museums in Tunisia from the colonial to the post-revolutionary period, demonstrating changes and continuities in role, setting and architecture across shifting ideological landscapes. The display of everyday culture in museums is generally looked down upon as being kitsch and old-fashioned. This research shows that, in Tunisia, ethnographic museums have been highly significant sites in the definition of social identities. They have worked as sites that diffuse social, economic and political tensions through a vast array of means, such as the exhibition itself, architecture, activities, tourism, and consumerism. The book excavates the evolution of paradigms in which Tunisian popular identity has been expressed through the ethnographic museum, from the modernist notion of 'indigenous authenticity' under colonial time, to efforts at developing a Tunisian ethnography after Independence, and more recent conceptions of cultural diversity since the revolution. Based on a combination of archival research in Tunisia and in France, participant observation and interviews with past and present protagonists in the Tunisian museum field, this research brings to light new material on an understudied area.
This book is the first full-length work concerning the restoration and excavations carried out at Qal’at Sem’an in Syria in the twentieth century. It was written by the notable architect and archaeologist Georges Tchalenko based on his notes, plans, photographs and sketches as he undertook the work in the years before and during the Second World War. Left unpublished at the time of his death during the Lebanese Civil War, it is published here for the first time in the original French with an English translation. The text is richly illustrated throughout and accompanied by a biographical essay by John Tchalenko and an introduction to the historiography of Qal’at Sem’an and Symeon Stylites by Emma Loosley Leeming.
In Esoteric Images: Decoding the Late Herat School of Painting Tawfiq Daʿadli decodes the pictorial language which flourished in the city of Herat, modern Afghanistan, under the rule of the last Timurid ruler, Sultan Husayn Bayqara (r.1469-1506). This study focuses on one illustrated manuscript of a poem entitled Khamsa by the Persian poet Nizami Ganjavi, kept in the British Library under code Or.6810. Tawfiq Daʿadli decodes the paintings, reveals the syntax behind them and thus deciphers the message of the whole manuscript. The book combines scholarly efforts to interpret theological-political lessons embedded in one of the foremost Persian schools of art against the background of the court dynamic of an influential medieval power in its final years.
Les fouilles UCL/INSAP, 2000-2005
Le site archéologique le plus visité au Maroc, Volubilis est connu depuis longtemps pour ses mosaïques spectaculaires. Ce livre traite de ce qui est arrivé à la ville après le retrait de l'administration romaine à la fin du troisième siècle. Les fouilles publiées ici montrent comment la ville a continué à survivre jusqu'au cinquième siècle, avec des maisons d'élite commandant encore des mosaïques élégantes, et comment cette occupation a pris fin dans un séisme brutal. La ville renaît au sixième siècle avec de nouveaux occupants, la tribu berbère des Awraba. Au VIIIe siècle, il devint le siège de l'homme qui unit la plus grande partie du Maroc à la tête de l'Awraba, Idris I, descendant du prophète Mahomet.

The most-visited archaeological site in Morocco, Volubilis has long been known for its spectacular mosaics. Instead, this book deals with what happened to the town after the Roman administration was withdrawn at the end of the third century. The excavations published here show how the town continued to survive into the fifth century, with élite houses still commissioning elegant and witty mosaics, and how this occupation came to an end in a brutal earthquake. The town revived in the sixth century with new occupants, the Berber Awraba tribe. In the eighth century, it became the headquarters of the man who united most of Morocco at the head of the Awraba, Idris I, a descendant of the prophet Mohammed.

Contributeurs/Contributors: Ali Aït Kaci, Victoria Amoros-Ruiz, Mustafa Atki, Amira K. Bennison, Helen Dawson, Fatima-Zohra El-Harrif, Hafsa El Hassani, Abdallah Fili, Dorian Fuller, Guy Hunt, Anthony King, Tarik Moujoud, Gaetano Palumbo, Ruth Pelling, Susan Walker, Mark Wilson Jones.