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Editor: J.S. Allen
Author Index of Byzantine Studies I

The Index was started originally in the 1930's by Professor Robert P. Blake of Harvard University as a cumulative index of bibliographical entries in the Byzantinische Zeitschrift. In 1942 the enterprise was transferred to Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C. Conceived primarily as an alphabetical author catalogue, the index was enriched further with references cited in Krumbacher. Concurrently, a catalogue of Slavic authors in the Cyrillic alphabet was completed with references from 77 journals published in Russian and other Slavic languages, most of them before 1917.
The Author Index I along with the Author Index II is a major bibliographical tool at Dumbarton Oaks, in daily use by students of all aspects of Byzantine history and civilization, patristic studies, and Slavic studies, as well as by scholars pursuing Late Antique studies, and, Western Mediaeval and Arabic relations with Byzantium.

This collection is also included in the Author Index of Byzantine Studies I & II collection.
Editor: J.S. Allen
Author Index of Byzantine Studies II

The Index was started originally in the 1930's by Professor Robert P. Blake of Harvard University as a cumulative index of bibliographical entries in the Byzantinische Zeitschrift. In 1942 the enterprise was transferred to Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C. Conceived primarily as an alphabetical author catalogue, the index was enriched further with references cited in Krumbacher. Concurrently, a catalogue of Slavic authors in the Cyrillic alphabet was completed with references from 77 journals published in Russian and other Slavic languages, most of them before 1917.
The Author Index II along with the Author Index I is a major bibliographical tool at Dumbarton Oaks, in daily use by students of all aspects of Byzantine history and civilization, patristic studies, and Slavic studies, as well as by scholars pursuing Late Antique studies, and, Western Mediaeval and Arabic relations with Byzantium.

This collection is also included in the Author Index of Byzantine Studies I & II collection.

Abstract

This paper will examine what the Late Roman pottery evidence from Britain can tell us about the economy of the period. There is clear evidence of west and east coast trade routes in the province, as well as the persistence of a pre-Roman economy in the ‘Highland zone’ beyond the frontier. The army was a driver for the economy, but healthy local market economies were also a stimulus to growth. The southern region became particularly prosperous in the 3rd and 4th c., although the region that is now Wales does not seem to have embraced this model.

In: Local Economies?
In: War and Warfare in Late Antiquity (2 vols.)
Justinian's Corpus iuris in the Byzantine world
Basilica Online is a fully-searchable online edition of the 17 volumes of the Basilica text and its scholia, as edited between 1945 and 1988 by H.J. Scheltema, D. Holwerda, and N. van der Wal. The Basilica is the single-most important source for Byzantine law throughout the period of the Byzantine empire, and is a major source for Byzantine studies more broadly.

Added Features and Benefits
- Most recent and accurate edition of the Basilica text and its scholia.
- Fully searchable in both Latin and Greek.
- All critical apparatus of the edition included.
- Browsing and navigation functionalities at volume (volumen), book (liber) or chapter (titulus) level.
- Full academic introduction written specifically for the online edition by Professor Dr B. H. Stolte.
- Comprehensive and up-to-date bibliography compiled by Dr T. E. van Bochove.
- Collective index to the text and scholia.

Readership:
Researchers with interests in Byzantine law, Byzantine society, medieval legal history, Roman law and its afterlives, and medieval Greek language.

Abstract

Recent decades have been fruitful for the gathering of new evidence, and for the establishment of new methods and theoretical perspectives in Late Roman funerary archaeology. This paper reflects on three aspects of the new data, distribution, character and dissemination, using examples from Britain and beyond. Grave distribution is strongly biased towards urban contexts, with consequences for socio-cultural and demographic analysis. Opportunities to advance understanding of burial as a process rather than a single depositional moment are discussed, including funerary rituals, commemorative activity, grave marking and the disturbance of human remains. A fuller exploitation of digital dissemination is advocated, in particular to allow one of the richest pre-modern skeletal samples to achieve an impact commensurate with its scale and quality.

In: Field Methods and Post-Excavation Techniques in Late Antique Archaeology
In: La pathologie du pouvoir: vices, crimes et délits des gouvernants
In: Cartography in Antiquity and the Middle Ages
In: Writing the Barbarian Past: Studies in Early Medieval Historical Narrative
In: Thomas Manlevelt - Questiones libri Porphirii