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Gender and Teens
Sexting: Gender and Teens provides a close-up look into the intimate and gendered world of teens and those who live with and work with them. The author draws upon interviews with teens, parents and caregivers, and many others who work with teens from teachers and youth workers to principals and police, we learn how the new digital world is still permeated by beliefs and patterns of earlier patriarchal structures. This three state study reveals there are significant gendered differences among teens in their perspectives on sexting, and these differences have implications for how to respond to the issue of teen sexting. Adults, too, demonstrate gendered differences in their views on teen sexting, and these differences have an important impact on the shaping of youth views about gender and sexuality.
As one mother said, “Girls set the pace, and boys notch the bedpost.”
Some key findings include:
The human curriculum of sexuality is both conserving and adapting, and these two impulses are always interacting.
We are in the midst of social and technological changes that have vast implications for all of our cultural notions, including sexuality.
Regarding sexting: Adults are pointing fingers in many directions and leaving adolescents to fend for themselves.
This compelling account—presented through the words of participants—provides a vivid introduction to hands-on social research that will be of interest to those in gender and women’s studies as well as the broader disciplines that touch upon these concerns, such as sociology, education, psychology, media studies, criminal justice, and other fields.
Sure to spark strong opinions and discussion, this book offers opportunities for sustained engagement with topics of critical interest to today’s digital world.
Moving the Boundaries of Discourse
Editor: Wendy Patton
Theoretical work on the career development of women has travelled a journey from critique to creation. Early work responded to and criticised a literature that focused on theorising male roles in a workplace that was conceptualised as providing vertical career paths primarily for middle class males. More recently theorists are creating new constructions and frameworks to enable a more holistic understanding of career, applicable to both women and men. These constructions include broadening the discussion from women’s careers to women’s working lives.
This is the fifth book in the Sense Publishers Career Development Series. It features the vibrant work of contributors from around the world writing in the field of women’s working lives. It emphasises the need to explore theoretical connections and understandings in order to facilitate a more holistic and inclusive understanding of women’s working lives. The writers in the current volume acknowledge the changing roles of women, in both public and private spheres. Women’s roles in paid work are changing both in their nature and type of engagement. In addition, with an ageing population, women’s roles in care work are increasingly being extended from child care to aged care.
This book provides a history of theorising about women’s careers, in addition to presenting a focus on current empirical and theoretical work which contributes to understandings of women’s working lives. Its contributions both map the current discourse and challenge future work to extend the boundaries of that discourse.
A Curricula of Stories and Place
Our book is a compilation of the work of experienced educational researchers and practitioners, all of whom currently work in educational settings across North America. Contributors bring to this discussion, an enriched view of diverse ecological perspectives regarding when and how contemporary environmental and Indigenous curriculum figures into the experiences of curricular theories and practices. This work brings together theorists that inform a cultural ecological analysis of the environmental crisis by exploring the ways in which language informs ways of knowing and being as they outline how metaphor plays a major role in human relationships with natural and reconstructed environments.
This integrated collection of theory and practice of environmental and Indigenous education is an essential tool for researchers, graduate and undergraduate students in faculties of education, environmental studies, social studies, multicultural education, curriculum theory and methods, global and comparative education, and women’s studies. Moreover, this work documents methods of developing ways of implementing Indigenous and Environmental Studies in classrooms and local communities through a framework that espouses an eco-ethical consciousness.
The proposed book is unique in that it offers a wide variety of perspectives, inviting the reader to engage in a broader conversation about the multiple dimensions of the relationship between ecology, language, culture, and education in relation to the cultural roots of the environmental crisis that brings into focus the local and global commons, language and identity, and environmental justice through pedagogical approaches by faculty across North America who are actively teaching and researching in this burgeoning field.
Editor: Emily A. Roper
Designed primarily as a textbook for upper division undergraduate courses in gender and sport, gender issues, sport sociology, cultural sport studies, and women’s studies, Gender Relations in Sport provides a comprehensive examination of the intersecting themes and concepts surrounding the study of gender and sport.
The 16 contributors, leading scholars from sport studies, present key issues, current research perspectives and theoretical developments within nine sub-areas of gender and sport:
Gender and sport participation
Theories of gender and sport
Gender and sport media
Sexual identity and sport
Intersections of race, ethnicity and gender in sport
Framing Title IX policy using conceptual metaphors
Studying the athletic body
Sexual harassment and abuse in sport
Historical developments and current issues from a European perspective

The intersecting themes and concepts across chapters are also accentuated. Such a publication provides access to the study of gender relations in sport to students across a variety of disciplines.

Gender Relations in Sport has been nominated for the following awards:
Best Edited Collection in Popular and American Culture 2014 sponsored by the Popular Culture Association and American Culture Association
Susan Koppelman Award for the Best Anthology, Multi-Authored, or Edited book in Feminist Studies in Popular and American Culture 2014 sponsored by the Popular Culture Association and American Culture Association
Reflections on Gender and Education in South Africa and Sudan
Internationally, there is growing awareness that the target of Education for All by 2015 will not be met unless more strident efforts are made to improve access for marginalized, hard-to-reach children (most often girls). For almost four decades gender equality in education has been one of the key global concerns and as a result various organizations at national and international levels along with governments have initiated programs focusing on achieving gender equality, women’s empowerment and improving girls’ access to education. By focusing on access alone (i.e. gender parity) we may not understand how education can be used to achieve empowerment and influence cultural practices that are gender insensitive. In this volume we attempt to call into question the content of gender equality as simple parity and in doing so we reflect upon the following questions:
Do the global (macro) discourses on gender equality in education lead to a focus on numbers only or to more profound sustainable changes at the national (meso) level and the school (micro) level? To what extent have national policies been adjusted to reflect the global discourses on gender equality?
Are schools/classrooms (micro) expected to adjust to these global discourses and if so in what ways has this happened?
What are the challenges of providing access to good quality education for girls in both countries? Is there a dichotomy between the schools/classrooms on the one hand and the community on the other in terms of gender equality/equity?
To what extent is gender equality/equity imposed upon schools and communities and does it take into account the cultural practices in traditional communities?
Intellectual Self-Portraits
Gender studies are a key lens through which education has been examined in the past forty years, having become an accepted and popular subfield in educational foundations studies. Moreover, scholars in gender and education have made tremendous contributions well beyond education, influencing humanities and social sciences scholars across the academy. Hearing the stories of these scholars—their development, education, important works, and thoughts on the future—offers unique insights into the genesis and growth of the field and gives new scholars an overview of advances made.
Leaders in Gender and Education: Intellectual Self-Portraits does just that, showing the history of gender and education through the eyes of 16 of its leaders. By recounting their experiences and scholarly work, they trace the development of feminist and profeminist research on girls, on boys, and on the issues shaping both gender and education—issues like race, sexuality, neoliberalism, globalization, and more. Importantly, the volume has a global focus, including scholars from the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Australia. This diversity gives readers a broad sense of the progress of gender scholarship in education around the world.
Each essay provides students and researchers alike with not only background on the 16 scholars included, but also the lists of major works—chosen by contributors themselves—direct readers to some of the most important scholarship on gender and education. Taken together, further, the contributors’ thoughts on the future of the field provide glimpses of productive directions for studies of gender and education.
A Case of Social Justice
In Zombie Seed and the Butterfly Blues: A Case of Social Justice students from a liberal arts class help Professor Delta Quinn and reporter, Caleb Barthes, uncover the political and corporate story behind the scientific development and implementation of the zombie seed.
As the secrets of the seed are revealed, so are the secrets of Delta’s tragic past which explain her desire to study the sequestered stories of domestic violence, which may lead the reader to ask whether there is a connection between cultural violence and interpersonal violence, and more importantly, whether such knowledge will awaken the zombie in all of us.
Socrates’ oft quoted maxim—the unexamined life is not worth living—speaks to the current image of the zombie who walks through life without critically thinking, without addressing political issues, without participating in civil discourse or democratic entitlements.
Zombie Seed and the Butterfly Blues: A Case of Social Justice is meant to engage the college student, to have students address and discuss issues of relevance to society at large. For example, it can be read in sociology or communication classes that show the documentary “The Corporation.”
Whether in anthropology, business, communication, English, history, organizational communication, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, rhetoric, sociology or women’studies the novel is intended to provide a teaching tool to professors who are looking for new ways to awaken students.
The author is happy to discuss how you can use the book in your courses. Contact her at rpclair@purdue. edu.
Click here to view or download SAMPLE CLASS ACTIVITIES
Award Nomination: Outstanding Book of the Year Award 2013 from the Organizational Communication Division of the National Communication Association
Mixed Race Women Exposing Nuances of Privilege and Oppression Politics
Winner! 2014 “Critics Choice Award” from the American Educational Studies Association (AESA).
Highlighting the words and experiences of 16 mixed race women (who have one white parent and one parent who is a person of color), Silvia Bettez exposes hidden nuances of privilege and oppression related to multiple positionalites associated with race, class, gender and sexuality. These women are “secret agent insiders” to cultural Whiteness who provide unique insights and perspectives that emerge through their mixed race lenses. Much of what the participants share is never revealed in mixed—White/of color—company.
Although critical of racial power politics and hierarchies, these women were invested in cross-cultural connections and revealed key insights that can aid all in understanding how to better communicate across lines of cultural difference. This book is an invaluable resource for a wide range of activists, scholars and general readers, including sociologists, sociologists of education, feminists, anti-oppression/social justice scholars, critical multicultural educators, and qualitative researchers who are interested in mixed race issues, cross cultural communication, social justice work, or who simply wish to minimize racial conflict and other forms of oppression.
Silvia Cristina Bettez teaches about issues of social justice and is an Assistant Professor of Cultural Foundations in the School of Education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
Implications for Self and Social Understanding in Adolescence
Research shows that the ability to "read others" or to make sense of the signs and symbols evident in human communication has an influence on children’s self-conceptions and their social interactions in childhood and adolescence. Given that psychological explanations play a key role in teaching and learning, further research is required, particularly on adolescents within the school context. This book investigates which aspects of these discourse experiences foster the growth of understanding of spirit, emotion, and mind in adolescence. Accordingly, from a co-relational approach to the development of understanding mind and education, this book builds on past and current research by investigating the social and emotional antecedents and consequences of psychological understanding in early adolescence. Specifically, this book explores the question: How do adolescents use their ability to understand other minds to navigate their relationships with themselves and their peers within the culture of ambiguity? To address this question, this book critically examines research on adolescents’ ability to understand mind, emotion, and spirit, and how they use this ability to help them navigate their relationships within the school setting. This book might appeal to a variety of educators and researchers, ranging from early childhood educators/researchers to university professors specializing in socioemotional and spiritual/moral worlds of adolescents.
(Hyper)Masculinity in a feminized context
"Scott Richardson gives us a finely detailed experiential account of how gender and teaching are woven together in public schools. Through his own memories and the narrativized experiences of his research subjects, Richardson demonstrates both the institutional benefits associated with being male and the fragility of masculinity. Membership in the “Boys’ Club” of hypermasculinity requires constant checking, surveillance, and choices that fit within the narrow range of dominant masculinity (so well detailed by R. W. Connell). Richardson’s causal style parallels the ease with which men in leadership and teaching positions articulate their allegiance to gender norms and one another, and in effect, set critique of such gender norms above comment: it’s just the way things are done. "
- Cris Mayo, Associate Professor of Education Policy, Organization and Leadership & Gender and Women’s Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Faculty Director of the Odyssey Project; author of Disputing the Subject of Sex: Sexuality and Public School Controversies.