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Abstract

Laos and Thailand show a decline of their diverse insect-eating traditions. Despite an urban “entomophagy” revival, respective rural practices are disappearing. In the context of a growing global interest in insects as food, this trend is being problematised as “Westernisation,” supposedly leading to food culture homogenisation. In this paper, I criticise that narrative as being over-simplified and eurocentric. In reporting qualitative empirical data, I argue that the current decline of insect-eating is rooted in local forms of “modernity,” rather than Western-dominated globalisation. In interpreting undeniable homogenisation tendencies, I also highlight the relevance of economically-driven processes, concluding that food culture transformation cannot be explained by one aspect or theory alone.

In: Asian Journal of Social Science
In: Asian Journal of Social Science

Abstract

We manipulated persona features characterising US and Taike subcultures, and examined its impact on preference toward Chinese-English alternated uses among Taiwanese youngsters. We conducted (i) a literature survey to identify the features iconic of US and Taike subcultures, (ii) a norming task to verify the subculture icons obtained, (iii) a multi-choice task to survey preference for six relevant non-/mixed forms of language, (iv) a forced-choice task to inspect “relative” code choices between Chinese versus its code-mix with English elements under the cues of the probe features. We found that visual cues and the stereotypical generalisations thereof play a role in language negotiation in first meeting contexts; cultural personae manifest themselves in the language alternation; with code mixing as an accommodative move, language users self-categorise themselves with the interlocutor that is stereotyped as having a linguistic preference associated to their persona character; linguistic convergence to stereotypes is driven by unconscious need.

In: Asian Journal of Social Science
Achieving Prosperity for All through Shared Development
Editors: Fang Cai and Juwei Zhang
This translation of selections from Reports on China’s Population and Labor (No. 17) allows readers to take stock of what China has done to tackle some of the country’s most important demographic and labor-related issues. The volume opens with two articles on the universal two-child policy, one of the most eagerly anticipated and closely watched population policy changes in recent years. These are followed by new population forecasts based on the new policy, and an analysis of what they mean for education resource allocation. In addition to familiar topics such as household registration, pension system reform and income distribution, this volume devotes considerable space to examining challenges facing Chinese women, especially those related to employment and marriage.

Abstract

When the disintegration of Western colonies in Africa and Asia ended the formal colonialism, the structures of dependency remained intact and were mushroomed to other countries in the region. One such dependency is academic dependency in which universities in much of Asia and Africa follow the curricula introduced in the colonial era. Although scholars put a great deal of efforts in challenging this academic imperialism, this dependency has been promoted by departments such as Department of English. Whereas “World Literature in English” or “Literary Studies” is gaining momentum around the world, the English literature programmes in Iranian universities are celebrating the Anglo-American canonical literature. By drawing on Syed Hussein Alatas’ concepts of “academic dependency,” this paper examines how the English literature programmes in Iran are promoting academic imperialism, which prompts the urgency of decolonisation of English literature. It also reveals how this decolonisation can be taken to its ultimate conclusion.

In: Asian Journal of Social Science
In: Asian Journal of Social Science