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Abstract

On June 1, 1981, Silme Domingo and Gene Viernes, two Filipino American labor activists in Alaska’s salmon canning industry were brutally gunned down in their Seattle-based union hall of the International Longshoremens’ and Warehousemens’ Union (ilwu) Local 37. Rather than focus on Domingo and Viernes’s tragic deaths, “Transpacific Freedom Dreams” centers their life-affirming activism. In particular, the authors pay attention to the ability of Domingo, Viernes, and other Filipino American cannery workers to productively fuse together two streams of radicalism within the Filipino diaspora: (1) the militant “old left” labor organizing of their “manongs” and (2) the revolutionary struggles of the National Democratic Movement of the Philippines. In our contemporary moment, when both the United States and Philippine ruling classes have taken an authoritarian turn, the authors make the case that the transpacific freedom dreams expressed in Domingo and Viernes’s organizing offers a useable history and a generative praxis of transnational activism that scholars and activists can learn from.

In: Filipino American Transnational Activism

Recognizing that youth are socialized into specific digital practices in unequal ways, this paper asserts that the way technology and new literacies are positioned in schools can potentially marginalize youth of lower social class positions. It argues that students who are not equipped with the economic, cultural, and social resources necessary to acquire digital practices valued by the knowledge economy may not be able to participate agentively in networked publics, nor gain the literacies for the new work order. By focusing on technology as a tool rather than as an object of study, schools can fail to equip less-resourced youth with the competences that will help them acquire cultural and social capital. The fetishization of educational technology and the lack of structured digital literacy instruction can constitute a hidden curriculum that provides a semblance of being technologically integrated, but ultimately reproduces social inequalities.

In: Youth and Globalization
In: Dependency, Neoliberalism and Globalization in Latin America
In: Dependency, Neoliberalism and Globalization in Latin America
In: Dependency, Neoliberalism and Globalization in Latin America
In: Dependency, Neoliberalism and Globalization in Latin America
In: Dependency, Neoliberalism and Globalization in Latin America
In: Dependency, Neoliberalism and Globalization in Latin America
In: Dependency, Neoliberalism and Globalization in Latin America