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Edited by Brian C. Brewer and David M. Whitford

Those who have a passing knowledge of John Calvin’s theology and reforms in Geneva in the sixteenth century may picture the confident and mature theologian and preacher without appreciating the various events, people, and circumstances that shaped the man. Before there was Protestantism’s first and eminent systematic theologian, there was the French youth, the law student and humanist, the Protestant convert and homeless exile, the reluctant reformer and anguished city leader. Snapshots of the young Calvin create a collage that give a bigger picture to the grey-bearded Protestant reformer. Eleven scholars of early-modern history have joined in this volume to depict the people, movements, politics, education, sympathizers, nemeses, and controversies from which Calvin immerged in his young adulthood.

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Edited by Madalina Toca and Dan Batovici

Ancient translations of late antique Christian literature serve to spread the body of knowledge to wider audiences in often radically new cultural contexts. For the texts which are translated, their versions are not only sometimes crucial textual witnesses, but also important testimonies of independent strands of reception, cast in the cultural context of the new language. This volume gathers ten contributions that deal with translations into Latin, Syriac, Armenian, Georgian, Coptic, Old Nubian, Old Slavonic, Sogdian, Arabic and Ethiopic, set in dialog in order to highlight the range of problems and approaches involved in dealing with the reception of Christian literature across the various languages in which it was transmitted.

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Nobuto Yamamoto

In Censorship in Colonial Indonesia, 1901–1942 Nobuto Yamamoto examines the institutionalization of censorship and its symbiosis with print culture in the Netherlands Indies. Born from the liberal desire to promote the well-being of the colonial population, censorship was not practiced exclusively in repressive ways but manifested in constructive policies and stimuli, among which was the cultivation of the “native press” under state patronage. Censorship in the Indies oscillated between liberal impulse and the intrinsic insecurity of a colonial state in the era of nationalism and democratic governance. It proved unpredictable in terms of outcomes, at times being co-opted by resourceful activists and journalists, and susceptible to international politics as it transformed during the Sino-Japanese war of the 1930s.

Charles Taylor

Perspektiven der Erziehungs- und Bildungsphilosophie

Edited by Nicole Balzer, Jens Beljan and Johannes Drerup

Charles Taylor gehört zu den bedeutendsten Philosophen der Gegenwart. Er hat die öffentliche Debatte über grundlegende Probleme liberaler Demokratien international sehr stark beeinflusst.In diesem Band werden wichtige Beiträge der Philosophie Taylors aus der Sicht der Erziehungs- und Bildungsphilosophie diskutiert und für die Klärung pädagogischer Probleme in modernen Gesellschaften genutzt. Eingeleitet wird der Band durch ein längeres Interview, in dem Taylor seine Perspektiven auf zentrale erziehungs- und bildungsphilosophische Fragestellungen vorstellt.

China's Old Churches

The History, Architecture, and Legacy of Catholic Sacred Structures in Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei Province

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Alan Richard Sweeten

China’s Old Churches, by Alan Sweeten, surveys the history of Catholicism in China (1600 to the present) as reflected by the location, style, and details of sacred structures in three crucial areas of north China. Closely examined are the most famous and important churches in the urban settings of Beijing and Tianjin, as well as lesser-known ones in rural Hebei Province.
Missionaries built Western-looking churches to make a broad religious statement important to themselves and Chinese worshippers. Non-Catholics, however, tended to see churches as sociopolitically foreign and culturally invasive. The physical-visual impact of church buildings is significant. Today, restored old churches and new sacred structures are still mostly of Western style, but often include a sacred grotto dedicated to Our Lady of China--a growing number of Catholics supporting Marian-centered activities.

Mo Zhang

Chinese Contract Law (2nd Ed) offers an in-depth analysis of the contract making process, performance and remedies in the legal framework established under the current regulatory scheme governing contracts in China. The book discusses various contract issues from theoretic and practical viewpoints, and addresses major contractual matters in a comparative way. It examines the law of contracts as drafted, interpreted and applied with Chinese characteristics.

The second edition comprises the latest developments in contract legislation, adjudication and practices in China, including the newly adopted laws, judicial interpretations and guiding cases. It emphasizes contextual distinctions and transactional considerations relevant to contract research and practice. The book provides a meaningful tool to get inside the contemporary contract law of China.

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Edited by Ying-jeou Ma

Volume 36 of the Chinese (Taiwan) Yearbook of International Law and Affairs publishes scholarly articles and essays on international and transnational law, as well as compiles official documents on the state practice of the Republic of China (ROC) in 2018. The Yearbook publishes on multi-disciplinary topics with a focus on international and comparative law issues regarding Taiwan, Mainland China and the Asia-Pacific.

Questions and comments can be directed to the editorial board of the Yearbook by email at yearbook@nccu.edu.tw

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Mark Humphries

The last half century has seen an explosion in the study of late antiquity, which has characterised the period between the third and seventh centuries not as one of catastrophic collapse and ‘decline and fall’, but rather as one of dynamic and positive transformation. Yet research on cities in this period has provoked challenges to this positive picture of late antiquity. This study surveys the nature of this debate, examining problems associated with the sources historians use to examine late antique urbanism, and the discourses and methodological approaches they have constructed from them. It aims to set out the difficulties and opportunities presented by the study of cities in late antiquity in terms of transformations of politics, the economy, and religion, and to show that this period witnessed very real upheaval and dislocation alongside continuity and innovation in cities around the Mediterranean.

The Citizenship Experiment  

Contesting the Limits of Civic Equality and Participation in the Age of Revolutions

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René Koekkoek

The Citizenship Experiment explores the fate of citizenship ideals in the Age of Revolutions. While in the early 1790s citizenship ideals in the Atlantic world converged, the twin shocks of the Haitian Revolution and the French Revolutionary Terror led the American, French, and Dutch publics to abandon the notion of a shared, Atlantic, revolutionary vision of citizenship. Instead, they forged conceptions of citizenship that were limited to national contexts, restricted categories of voters, and ‘advanced’ stages of civilization. Weaving together the convergence and divergence of an Atlantic revolutionary discourse, debates on citizenship, and the intellectual repercussions of the Terror and the Haitian Revolution, Koekkoek offers a fresh perspective on the revolutionary 1790s as a turning point in the history of citizenship.

The City Gate in Ancient Israel and Her Neighbors

The Form, Function, and Symbolism of the Civic Forum in the Southern Levant

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Daniel A. Frese

In The City Gate in Ancient Israel and Her Neighbors, Daniel A. Frese provides a wide-ranging portrayal of one of the most prominent social institutions in the kingdoms of the southern Levant during the Iron II period: the use of the city gate as a hub for numerous and diverse civic functions. The book provides an up-to-date description of the architecture of gate complexes based on archaeological evidence, and a systematic description of the many functions of the gate seen in hundreds of texts from the Hebrew Bible and the broader ancient Near East. The final chapters of the book discuss the conceptual significance of gates in Israelite culture, based on idiomatic and symbolic gate terminology in the Hebrew Bible.

City Intelligible

A Philosophical and Historical Anthropology of Global Commoditisation before Industrialisation

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Frank Perlin

In City Intelligible Perlin marries a transcendental-critical philosophical approach with one historical and empirical in order to penetrate the culture of commodification dominating global societal development over many centuries prior to industrialisation. Commodification represents a dense and abundant global evidence for the essential translatability informing all cultural difference and enabling exchange of cultural goods transiting all settled society.

Perlin investigates the two anthropologies — one universalist and the other particularist — in order to reach an eventual synthesis that reinterprets societal relationship both in detail and in general, leading to a derivation of the universal foundations of human reasoning and formation of culture both logically and empirically (historically), and that in founds a comprehension of human differentiation.