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Caleb Henry Wheeler

In The Right to Be Present at Trial in International Criminal Law Caleb Henry Wheeler analyses what it means for the accused to be present during international criminal trials and how that meaning has changed. This book also examines the impact that absence from trial can have on the fair trial rights of the accused and whether those rights can be upheld outside of the accused’s presence. Using primary and secondary sources, Caleb Wheeler has identified four different categories of absence and how each affects the right to be present. This permits a more nuanced understanding of how the right to be present is understood in international criminal law and how it may develop in the future.
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Revolution and Its Alternatives

Other Marxisms, Other Empowerments, Other Priorities     

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Tom Brass

Against the usual argument heard most frequently on the left, that there is no subject for a radical politics together with its form of political mobilization, there is – but in the absence of a radical leftist project, this subject has in the past transferred, and in many instances is still transferring, his/her support to the radical politics on offer from the other end of the ideological spectrum. The combination of on the one hand a globally expanding industrial reserve army, generating ever more intense competition in the labour markets of capitalism, and on the other the endorsement by many on the left not of class but rather of non-class identities espoused by the ‘new’ populist postmodernism, has fuelled what can only be described as a perfect storm, politically speaking.
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Historically, all societies have used comparison to analyze cultural difference through the interaction of religion, power, and translation. When comparison is a self-reflective practice, it can be seen as a form of comparatism. Many scholars are concerned in one way or another with the practice and methods of comparison, and the need for a cognitively robust relativism is an integral part of a mature historical self-placement. This volume looks at how different theories and practices of writing and interpretation have developed at different times in different cultures and reconsiders the specificities of modern comparative approaches within a variety of comparative moments. The idea is to reconsider the specificities, the obstacles, and the possibilities of modern comparative approaches in history and anthropology through a variety of earlier and parallel comparative horizons. Particular attention is given to the exceptional role of Athens and Jerusalem in shaping the Western understanding of cultural difference.
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Regaining Paradise Lost: Indigenous Land Rights and Tourism

Using the UNGPs on Business and Human Rights in Mainstreaming Indigenous Land Rights in the Tourism Industry

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Mary Kristerie A. Baleva

Mary Kristerie A. Baleva’s M Regaining Paradise Lost: Indigenous Land Rights and Tourism uses the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights as its overarching legal framework to analyze the intersections of indigenous land rights and the tourism industry. Drawing from treatises, treaties, and case law, it traces the development of indigenous rights discourse from the Age of Discovery to the adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The book highlights the Philippines, home to a rich diversity of indigenous peoples, and a country that considers tourism as an important contributor to economic development. It chronicles the Ati Community’s 15-year struggle for recognition of their ancestral domains in Boracay Island, the region’s premiere beach destination.
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James White

In this first full-length biography of Alexander Bogdanov, James D. White traces the intellectual development of this key socialist thinker, situating his ideas in the context of the Russian revolutionary movement. He examines the part Bogdanov played in the origins of Bolshevism, his role in the revolutions of 1905 and 1917 and his conflict with Lenin, which lasted into Soviet times. The book examines in some detail Bogdanov’s intellectual legacy, which, though deliberately obscured and distorted by his adversaries, was considerable and is of lasting significance. Bogdanov was an original and influential interpreter of Marx. He had a mastery of many spheres of knowledge, this expertise being employed in writing his chief theoretical work Tectology, which anticipates modern systems theory.
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Fiona Leach

Reclaiming the Women of Britain’s First Mission to Africa is the compelling story of three long-forgotten women, two white and one black, who lived, worked and died on the Church Missionary Society’s first overseas mission at the dawn of the nineteenth century. It was a time of momentous historical events: the birth of Britain’s missionary movement, the creation of its first African colony as a home for freed slaves, and abolition of the slave trade. Casting its long shadow over much of the women’s story was the protracted war with Napoleon.

Taking as its starting point a cache of fifty letters from the three women, the book counters the prevailing narrative that early missionary endeavour was a uniquely European and male affair, and reveals the presence of a surprising number of women, among them several with very forceful personalities. Those who are interested in women’s life history, black history, the history of the slave trade and British evangelism will find this book immensely enjoyable.
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Récits contemporains d’endeuillés après suicide

Les cas Fottorino, Vigan, Grimbert, Rahmani, Charneux et Delaume

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Michèle Bacholle-Bošković

Cet ouvrage de Michèle Bacholle est le premier à examiner des écrits autobiographiques de romanciers français contemporains endeuillés après suicide. Alors que les livres de Fottorino et Vigan permettent une réflexion sur la famille, la filiation et les secrets (aux effets pathogènes et transgénérationnels), ceux de Grimbert et Rahmani montrent comment l’Histoire (l’Holocauste et les massacres des harkis) ont causé des suicides retardés. Charneux et Delaume ouvrent, eux, une discussion sur les enfants endeuillés après suicide. Puisant dans la psychologie et la suicidologie, ce livre montre les stratégies utilisées pour dire l’indicible et que l’écriture permet une restructuration de soi. En explorant le suicide et les tenants et aboutissants de ce deuil particulier, il lève aussi un tabou.

Michèle Bacholle’s book is the first to examine autobiographical writings by contemporary French novelists, survivors of another person’s suicide. While Fottorino’s and Vigan’s books allow a reflection on family, filiation, and family secrets (with their pathogenic and transgenerational effects), Grimbert’s and Rahmani’s show how History (the Holocaust and the harkis’ massacres at the end of the Algerian War) caused delayed suicides, and Charneux and Delaume open a discussion on children as suicide survivors. Using sources in psychology and suicidology, beyond showing the strategies these writers use to tell the unspeakable and how writing enables self-restructuration, this book breaks a taboo by exploring suicide and the ins and outs of its specific kind of mourning.