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This book intends to look into CLIL teaching professional practice through the prism of reflection. It offers a comprehensive coverage of a CLIL teacher’s features, their attitudes to the approach, teaching methodology, assessment, materials development, cooperation with other CLIL and non-CLIL teachers, professional development, expectations and beliefs. Furthermore, it focuses on CLIL teachers’ positive and negative emotions experienced in relation to CLIL. As a CLIL trainer I spend a lot of time with CLIL teachers trying to guide them in the process of teaching in CLIL but also to help them face many challenges and overcome obstacles which often discourage them from working in the CLIL environment. Being greatly inspired by the ongoing research in the field but also by my CLIL trainee teachers I felt there was a need to conduct such research and make the reader reflect on his/her own teaching experiences in CLIL.
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A crucial question for Chinese as a Second Language research is how to help elevate Chinese language teaching methodology to the level of other world language methodologies such as English, Spanish and German. This work goes in two directs. One explores how to apply research results achieved in Chinese linguistics to Chinese language teaching and the other is engaged in creating a strong applied linguistics research field that supports Chinese language teaching. CASLAR scholars are mainly involved in the latter one. This book is a representative sample of their research endeavors.
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Haim Blanc’s Communal Dialects in Baghdad is one of the most influential works ever written on the on the linguistic diachrony of vernacular Arabic. Based on original fieldwork conducted during the years 1957–1962, this book portaits the extensive regional continuum of modern spoken Arabic stretching across parts of Mesopotamia and N. Syria, evinced by the Muslim, Jewish, and Christian speech communities in Baghdad.
Typos and other mistakes have been corrected in this reprint, which is accompanied by an Editorial Preamble by Alexander Borg and a Foreword by Paul Wexler, and contains references to the original page numbers.
Encounters with Post-colonial (Counter)Cultures (2000-2020)
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How and when does culture enter the discourse on liberation, transition and crisis in an African post-colony such as Zimbabwe? In a deeply polarised nation reeling from a difficult transition and an unrelenting economic crisis, it is increasingly becoming difficult for the ZANU PF regime to prescribe and enforce its monolithic concept of liberation. This book culls, from contemporary (counter)cultures of liberation and transition, the state of liberations in Zimbabwe. It explores how culture has functioned as a complex site where rigid state-authored liberations are legitimated and naturalised but also where they are negotiated, contested and subverted.
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This volume is both a continuation of the six already published titles in the series (2021-23) and an addition to the Concise Dictionary of Novel Medical and General Hebrew Terminology from the Middle Ages. It continues mapping the medical terminology features in medieval Hebrew medical woks in order to facilitate study of medical terms that do not appear in the existing dictionaries as well as identifying the medical terminology used by specific authors and translators in order to identify anonymous medical material. The terminology discussed in this volume has been derived from ten different sources, including translations from Ibn Sīnā’s K. al-Qānūnby Nathan ha-Meʾati, Zeraḥyah Ḥen, and two anonymous authors. Further it contains terminology from the Maʾamar ba-Haqqazah, an anonymous Hebrew translation of Abū Bakr Muḥammad ibn Zakariyyā al-Rāzī’s K. fī al-faṣd, as well as from an anonymous translation of Guy de Chauliacʼs Inventarium sive Chirurgia Magna.
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The title concept ‘in-between’ (metaxu) refers to identity that remains in perpetual disjunction, dispersion and crisis. This book proves that ‘in-between’ is not an empty space, but a productive mode of creating new qualities, experiences, ideas and representations. The authors of individual chapters interpret selected aspects of metaxu in relevant to contemporary cultural communication areas, i.e. linguistic and more broadly semiotic, and make contemporary discourses the object of exploration. Most of the analyses are based on the Polish-language linguistic context; however, they refer to a universal perspective of culture and communication.
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Delve into Ezekiel’s tumultuous world, discovering his role as YHWH’s מוֹפֵת, a unique ‘sign’, among many others, and a divine communicator. Does the Exile’s trauma find an ‘ameliorating’ perspective through Ezekiel’s symbolic actions and identity? From temple absence to YHWH’s ‘glory’ departure, from loss and prohibited grief to intermittent mutism, is Ezekiel a response to a communication crisis between YHWH and Israel? Uncover how מוֹפֵת’s elusive meaning sheds light on Ezekiel’s role as an ‘embodiment’ of YHWH’s presence, a bridge in YHWH’s intricate relationship with Israel. Through meticulous exegesis and linguistic-theological analysis, you will experience afresh Ezekiel’s narrative and theology.
In this book, Christopher Hart provides a comprehensive description of an applied form of Cognitive Linguistics in Cognitive Critical Discourse Analysis (Cognitive CDA). Cognitive CDA applies frameworks in cognitive linguistics in analyses of political texts and talk to highlight the ideological qualities and legitimating functions of conceptualisations associated with dominant discourse practices. Across the ten lectures, various frameworks in cognitive linguistics are applied, including cognitive grammar, conceptual semantics, conceptual metaphor theory and discourse space theory. Texts and talk from a variety of contexts and genres are analysed. In the final two lectures, Cognitive CDA is extended to multimodal data in the form of images and gestures.
In the Arab world, people belong to kinship groups (lineages and tribes). Many lineages are named after animals, birds, and plants. Why? This survey evaluates five old explanations – “totemism,” “emulation of predatory animals,” “ancestor eponymy,” “nicknaming,” and “Bedouin proximity to nature.” It suggests a new hypothesis: Bedouin tribes use animal names to obscure their internal cleavages. Such tribes wax and wane as they attract and lose allies and clients; they include “attached” elements as well as actual kin. To prevent outsiders from spotting “attached” groups, Bedouin tribes scatter non-human names across their segments, making it difficult to link any segment with a human ancestor. Young’s argument contributes to theories of tribal organization, Arab identity, onomastics, and Near Eastern kinship.