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Editor: Jan Bloemendal
In his ‘Project of the New Testament’ Erasmus also wrote a running commentary on all New Testament books, except Revelation, in the form of a paraphrase. In this volume, the Paraphrase on John – Latin text with critical apparatus, and English introduction and commentary, is edited. In the paraphrase, Erasmus turns out to be a mature interpreter of the Bible, who advocated a new Christianity, which he called ‘the philosophy of Christ’, and implicitly criticized the clergy of his own age.
Gibt es das „Corpus Johanneum“ oder gibt es gar mehrere Verfasser? Und ist die Johannesapokalypse dem sogenannten Corpus Johanneum zuzurechnen oder ist ihr theologischer Ansatz derart anders, dass sie als Fremdkörper nicht nur gegenüber den anderen johanneischen Schriften, sondern sogar als Sonderling im ganzen Neuen Testament zu gelten hat?
Auch in ihrem dritten Band des Frankfurter Neuen Testaments bleiben Stefan Alkier und Thomas Paulsen ihrer Übersetzungsmethodik treu, welche die neutestamentlichen Texte wörtlich aus dem Koine-Griechisch übersetzt. Das hat erhebliche Folgen für den Wortlaut und das Verständnis dieser Texte – so ist z.B. nicht von „Sünde“ oder „Teufel“, sondern von „Verfehlung“ und vom „Zerwerfer“ die Rede.
„Kaum einen Text glauben heutige Leserinnen und Leser so gut zu kennen wie das Johannesevangelium. Die neue Übersetzung von Stefan Alkier und Thomas Paulsen zeigt, wie falsch wir mit dieser Einschätzung liegen. Philologisch genau, erfrischend sperrig und fern von eingefahrenen Pfaden zeigt sie, wie aufregend und ungewöhnlich dieser Text wirklich ist; damit lädt sie uns dazu ein, ihn in seinem Anspruch ernst zu nehmen und uns auf seine Herausforderung einzulassen.“ Dr. Thomas Schmitz (Professor für Gräzistik an der Rheinischen Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn)
By applying a stylistic analysis within a systemic-functional linguistic framework, this study argues that Luke's construal of the Jerusalem Council in Acts 15 and its co-thematic passages attempt to persuade Jewish believers of Luke's audience not to separate from multi-ethnic churches, a goal that is accomplished through subverting the value orientations of a prominent Noahic tradition within Second Temple Jewish literature that promotes strict Jewish isolation from Gentiles. As a result, this study breaks fresh methodological ground in the linguistic study on the New Testament and also advances critical scholarship on the book of Acts.
The Bible and the Academy in the Public Square. Essays for the Occasion of Professor John Barton’s 70th Birthday
Volume Editors: Hywel Clifford and Megan Daffern
Exegesis has ethical dimensions. This is the case for the Bible, which has a foundational status in traditional perspectives that is simultaneously contested in the modern world. This innovative essay collection, largely about Hebrew Bible/Old Testament texts, is written by an international team – all Doktorkinder of a pioneer in this area, Professor John Barton, whose 70th birthday this volume celebrates. With interdisciplinary angles, the essays highlight the roles and responsibilities of the biblical scholar, often located professionally between religious and secular domains. This reflects a broader reality: all readers of texts are engaged ethically in the public square of ideas.
Motion towards Maximal Proximity and Higher Status
Author: Oscar Jiménez
Oscar E. Jiménez opens up the multi-dimensional implications of Ephesians 2:11-22 for narrative and theological analysis, demonstrating that each metaphor in the text blends and creates a single, complex narrative. Concentric spatial places construct the text’s landscape on which the Gentiles move, each place representing increasing intimacy and familiarity through national, familial, architectural, and cultic images. Christ is the vehicle of that motion, and also the agent, breaking down walls and abolishing enmity, and ultimately building the structure as both builder and cornerstone. This will be an important book for New Testament scholars and scholars interested in the use of linguistics in Biblical studies, in particular literary and narrative analysis to the New Testament epistles.
The Spirit’s Empowerment of the Early Jesus Community
What does Luke mean when he describes the Spirit as gift (Acts 2:38)? This study explores the social implications of gift-giving in the Greco-Roman world, arguing that gifts initiate and sustain relationships. Therefore, the description of the Spirit as gift is inherently social, which is shown in the Spirit’s empowerment of the teaching, unity, meals, sharing of possessions and worship of the early Jesus community. The Spirit as gift then leads us to see that the early Jesus community is “the community of the Holy Spirit.”
A Jewish Female Icon of the First Century CE
Author: Tal Ilan
This is a biography of Queen Berenice, the daughter of King Agrippa I, sister of King Agrippa II, wife of two kings and lover of the emperor designate Flavius Titus. A Jew of the 1st century, she witnessed some of the foundational events of her time like the emergence of Christianity and the destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, is. She met and socialized with the most important people of her day - Philo the Philosopher (who was at one time her brother-in-law), Paul the Apostle (whose trial she witnessed) and Josephus the Historian who told part of her story.
Author: Chiaen Liu
This book examines the nature of the early church from a Petrine perspective, employing an analysis of register to implement a more synthetic study of relevant texts in the New Testament. Liu utilises a type of discourse analysis that provides a framework for classifying grammatical and lexical information so that the reader can better understand the social function of not only Peter’s speeches in Acts, but also the two epistles attributed to him. Liu’s original and detailed study looks at the content and structure of the texts to enhance our understanding of the early church, with particular attention paid to the dichotomy between Petrine and Pauline Christianity and their competing pictures of Christian origins. This book will interest all scholars and students who wish to extend their understanding of both the historical and literary Peter.