Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 263 items for :

  • Drama & Theatre Studies x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
Clear All
Textualization and Performance, Authorship and Censorship of the “National Drama” of China from the Late Qing to the Present
Author: David Rolston
What was the most influential mass medium in China before the internet? Jingju (Peking opera)! Although its actors were commonly thought to have been illiterate, written and other inscripted versions of plays became more and more important and varied.
This book shows how increasing textualization and the resulting fixation of a performance tradition that once privileged improvisation changed the genre. It traces, from Jingju’s birth in the 19th century to the present, how texts were used for the production and consumption of this important performance genre and the changes in the concepts of authorship, copyright, and performance rights that took place during the process. The state’s desire to police what was performed is shown to have been a major factor in these changes.
The scope and coverage of the book is already unprecedented, but it is also supplemented by an additional chapter (on where the plays were performed, who performed them, and who went to see them) available for download online.
Networks in Literature, Visual and Performing Arts, and other Cultural Practices
This co-edited volume offers new insights into the complex relations between Brussels and Vienna in the turn-of-the-century period (1880-1930). Through archival research and critical methods of cultural transfer as a network, it contributes to the study of Modernism in all its complexity.
Seventeen chapters analyse the interconnections between new developments in literature (Verhaeren, Musil, Zweig), drama (Maeterlinck, Schnitzler, Hofmannsthal), visual arts (Minne, Khnopff, Masereel, Child Art), architecture (Hoffmann, Van de Velde), music (Schönberg, Ysaÿe, Kreisler, Kolisch), as well as psychoanalysis (Varendonck, Anna Freud) and café culture. Austrian and Belgian artists played a crucial role within the complex, rich, and conflictual international networks of people, practices, institutions, and metropoles in an era of political, social and technological change and intense internationalization.

Contributors: Sylvie Arlaud, Norbert Bachleitner, Anke Bosse, Megan Brandow-Faller, Alexander Carpenter, Piet Defraeye, Clément Dessy, Aniel Guxholli, Birgit Lang, Helga Mitterbauer, Chris Reyns-Chikuma, Silvia Ritz, Hubert Roland, Inga Rossi-Schrimpf, Sigurd Paul Scheichl, Guillaume Tardif, Hans Vandevoorde.
Author: Jane Gilmer
The Alchemical Actor offers an imagination for new and future theatre inspired by the manifesto of Antonin Artaud. The alchemical four elements – earth, water, air and fire and the four alchemical stages – nigredo, albedo, citrino and rubedo serve as initiatory steps towards the performance of transmutational consciousness. The depth psychological work of Carl G. Jung, the theatre techniques of Michael Chekhov and Rudolf Steiner infuse ‘this’ Great Work. Jane Gilmer leads the reader through alchemical imaginations beyond material cognition towards gold-making heart-thinking - key to new and future theatre.
Author: Delphine Calle
Dans Racine et les trois publics de l’amour Delphine Calle analyse la séduction du théâtre racinien à partir des débats sur les passions du XVIIe siècle français. Concupiscence ou pur amour, amour-propre ou désir de plaire, l’amour est au cœur de la tragédie racinienne : moteur de l’action tragique, il émeut le public. Celui-ci est triple : le protagoniste amoureux est non seulement scruté par les spectateurs dans la salle, passionnés par la passion, il s’expose devant le personnage qu’il aime et paraît devant le tribunal de sa propre conscience. À l’instar des moralistes du XVIIe siècle, grands censeurs du théâtre, ce livre établit le parallèle entre les expériences amoureuse et théâtrale, pour mieux percer la dramaturgie de l’amour chez Racine.

In Racine et les trois publics de l’amour Delphine Calle unravels the seductive power of Racinian tragedy by turning to the 17th-century French debates on love. Whether it is staged as concupiscence or pure love, as self-love or the desire to please, love is at the heart of Racinian theatre: it sparks tragic action and moves its spectators. These spectators are threefold: the tragic lover is not only scrutinized by the real audience, who is passionate about passion, he also feels the gaze of his loved one and of his own conscience, that questions the value of his love. Following the 17th- century moralist theatre critics, this monograph aligns amorous and theatrical experiences, in order to reveal Racine’s dramaturgy of love.
Completed shortly before her death in 2019, Tragedy and Philosophy is the sum of Agnes Heller’s reflections on European history and culture, seen through the prism of Europe’s two unique literary creations: tragedy and philosophy. Part 1 traces their parallel history from ancient Athens to rebirth in early modern London and Paris. Part 2 explores the interactions between post-metaphysical philosophy and post-tragic drama from the eighteenth through to the twentieth centuries. Heller’s perspective is post-Hegelian: the story of European culture can only be told from its end, the generalization of modernity across the globe. In this sense Part 3 is Heller’s farewell to the grand narrative of European history and culture as well as her own personal farewell to philosophy.
Variations on Racinian Excuses
Author: Edward Forman
This comparative literary study re-evaluates the reciprocal relationship between tragic drama and current approaches to guilt and extenuation. Focussing on Racine but ranging widely, it sheds original light on tragic archetypes (Phaedra, Oedipus, Clytemnestra, Medea and others) through the lenses of performance theory and modern attitudes towards blame.
Tragic drama and legal systems both aim to evaluate the merits of excuses provided on behalf of perpetrators of catastrophic acts. Edward Forman wittily and provocatively explores modern judicial concepts – diminished responsibility, provocation, trauma, ignorance, scapegoating – through the responses of characters in tragedy. Attention is paid to the way in which classical plays (ancient Greek and seventeenth-century French) have been re-interpreted in performance in the light of modern perceptions of human responsibility and helplessness.
Volume Editor: Andrew H. Weaver
A Companion to Music at the Habsburgs Courts in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, edited by Andrew H. Weaver, is the first in-depth survey of Habsburg musical patronage over a broad timeframe. Bringing together existing research and drawing upon primary sources, the authors, all established experts, provide overviews of the musical institutions, the functions of music, the styles and genres cultivated, and the historical, political, and cultural contexts for music at the Habsburg courts. The wide geographical scope includes the imperial courts in Vienna and Prague, the royal court in Madrid, the archducal courts in Graz and Innsbruck, and others. This broad view of Habsburg musical activities affirms the dynasty’s unique position in the cultural life of early modern Europe.

Contributors are Lawrence Bennett, Charles E. Brewer, Drew Edward Davies, Paula Sutter Fichtner, Alexander J. Fisher, Christine Getz, Beth L. Glixon, Jeffrey Kurtzman, Virginia Christy Lamothe, Honey Meconi, Sara Pecknold, Jonas Pfohl, Pablo L. Rodríguez, Steven Saunders, Herbert Seifert, Louise K. Stein, and Andrew H. Weaver.
Social Dynamics of Turbulent Theatrical Events
Since the beginning of theatre history, scandals have taken place and the variety of causes, processes and types of interactions makes them an interesting object of study. Theatre scandals often indicate clashes with a dominant ideology or with the ideology of a particular group in society. Sometimes, following a scandal, the attacked ideology changes and incorporates the possibility of the aesthetics or themes that caused the clash. In this way, scandals can cause dynamic changes within cultural systems.
Next to theoretical considerations the contributors, all members of the IFTR Theatrical Event Working Group, present in their various case studies a wide cultural and chronological diversity of theatre scandals, all of which were experienced as very shocking moments in theatre history.
World Political Theatre and Performance: Theories, Histories, Practices is the second collection of essays to emerge from the Political Performances Working Group at the International Federation for Theatre Research. Bringing together scholars and practitioners from multiple locations, the book analyses a range of examples – historical and contemporary – of counter-hegemonic theatre and performance.
Part 1 offers a diachronic view of the relationship between activism and performance; Part 2 focuses on the changing nature of what constitutes ‘political theatre’ today. Case studies from Finland to India and from Chile to China are framed by section introductions that underline both commonalities and tensions, while the general introduction reflects on what a radical practice can look like in the face of global neoliberalism.

Contributors: Julia Boll, Paola Botham, Marco Galea, Aneta Głowacka, Pujya Ghosh, Camila González Ortiz, Bérénice Hamidi-Kim, Fatine Bahar Karlıdağ, Madli Pesti, José Ramón Prado-Pérez, Trish Reid, Mikko-Olavi Seppälä, Andy Smith, Evi Stamatiou, Wei Zheyu.
Volume Editor: Bernard W. Andrews
Arts education research in Canada has increased significantly since the beginning of this century. New forms of arts-based research, such as ethnodrama and a/r/t/ography, have arisen and made significant contributions to the literature. Researchers in departments/schools/faculties of dance, drama, music, visual arts, media studies, cultural studies and education have been successful in acquiring peer-reviewed grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council to undertake large-scale projects and disseminate the findings internationally. The purpose of this edited collection, entitled Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2: Issues and Directions, is to provide an overview of the current research undertaken across the country, thereby providing a valuable resource for students, professors and research associates working in the arts disciplines, media studies, education, and cultural studies.

Contributors are: Bernard W. Andrews, Kathy Browning, Ranya Essmat Saad, Maia Giesbrecht, Shelley M. Griffin, Rita Irwin, Glenys McQueen-Fuentes, Laura Nemoy, Lori Lynn Penny, Jennifer Roswell, Michelle Searle, Alison Shields, Anita Sinner, Darlene St. Georges, Peter Vietgen, John L. Vitale, Jennifer Wicks, Kari-Lynn Winters, and Thibault Zimmer.