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Author: Robin Greene
In this volume, Robin J. Greene traces the development of Greek elegy and lyric in the hands of Hellenistic and Roman-era poets, from literary superstars such as Callimachus and Theocritus to more obscure, often anonymous authors. Designed as a guide for advanced students and scholars working in adjacent fields, this volume introduces and explores the diverse body of surviving later Greek elegy and lyric, contextualizes it within Hellenistic and Roman culture and politics, and surveys contemporary critical interpretations, methodological approaches, and avenues for future study.
SEG LXVI covers newly published Greek inscriptions and studies on previously known documents from the year 2016, with occasional additions from previous years that have been missed in earlier volumes and from studies published after 2015 but pertaining to material from 2016.
Editor: Gesine Manuwald
This strand of Brill Research Perspectives addresses important themes connected with the reworking of material inherited from classical antiquity, primarily the Latin language and Latin writing conventions, but also the creative adaptation of classical traditions in other languages and media. Contributions by leading scholars from different disciplinary backgrounds will provide up-to-date overviews on the context, key texts, controversial questions, existing scholarship and avenues for further research concerning particular themes. These surveys are designed to give advanced students and scholars new to this particular area an idea of the sources, approaches and existing research, sketching scholarly history and facilitating further work.
Series Editors: Stanley E. Porter and Wendy Porter
Texts and Editions for New Testament Study is designed to offer texts and editions, with commentary and comment, of important sources for the study of the New Testament and its world. Primary sources are envisioned as a mainstay of the series, in which documents that enlighten and support New Testament study are published in definitive, accessible and informative editions, often with supporting commentary. Collections of essays and monographs that focus upon these types of important sources are also welcome, as they advance the scholarly discussion.

The series has published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
Author: Robert Forgács
Situating the close relationship between Latin and music within its historical context, this volume presents an overview of Latin and music in the educational system of the time – schools, choir schools and universities – and the development and pervasive influence of musical humanism. This influence is seen primarily in the writings of music theorists, the documents of dedication found in music publications and above all in the settings of classical and Neo-Latin texts as well as in some liturgical and extra-liturgical ones. Discussion of this repertoire forms the centre of the volume. The emphasis is on practical matters: the study of Latin and music, and the music’s composition, performance and reception.
In a novel study of the impact of classical culture, John McManamon demonstrates that Renaissance scholars rediscovered the importance of swimming to the ancient Greeks and Romans and conceptualized the teaching of swimming as an art.
The ancients had a proverb that described a truly ignorant person as knowing “neither letters nor swimming.” McManamon traces the ancient textual and iconographic evidence for an art of swimming, demonstrates its importance in warfare, and highlights the activities of free-divers who exploited the skill of swimming to earn a living. Renaissance theorists of a humanist education first advocated a rebirth for swim training, Erasmus included the classical proverb in his Adages, and two sixteenth-century scholars wrote treatises in dialogue form on methods for teaching young people how to swim.
In the post-Enlightenment world, philosophy and religion have come to occupy different, even opposed, domains. But how were they related before this? What were the commonalities and dissimilarities between them? Did they already contain the seeds of their later division – or do they still share enough in common to allow meaningful conversation between them?

This new Brill series “Ancient Philosophy & Religion” provides an interdisciplinary platform for monographs, edited volumes and commentaries on this issue. It is edited by two leading scholars in the fields it brings together, George Boys-Stones (Ancient Philosophy) and George van Kooten (New Testament Studies), and is supported by an editorial board whose members are known for their work in the area. It invites scholars of ancient philosophy, Classics, early Judaism, ancient Judaism, New Testament & early Christianity, and all other relevant fields, to showcase their research on ancient philosophy and religion and to contribute to the debate.

The series’ subject matter is symbolized by its icon, used by courtesy and permission of the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. It represents a dialogue between philosophers, as shown on one of the reliefs of the funeral sacrificial table (mensa) from the “House of Proclus” on the Southern slope of the Acropolis at Athens, excavated in 1955. Dating from 350-325 BC, the reliefs of the mensa depict, after the lamentation and the farewell, the posthumous encounter of the deceased with the philosophers (1950 NAM 90).

The editors very much welcome proposals for monographs, edited volumes and even commentaries on relevant texts.

The history of European integration goes back to the early modern centuries (c. 1400–1800), when Europeans tried to set themselves apart as a continental community with distinct political, religious, cultural, and social values in the face of hitherto unseen societal change and global awakening. The range of concepts and images ascribed to Europeanness in that respect is well documented in Neo-Latin literature, since Latin constituted the international lingua franca from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries. In Europe and Europeanness in Early Modern Latin Literature Isabella Walser-Bürgler examines the most prominent concepts of Europe and European identity as expressed in Neo-Latin sources. It is aimed at both an interested general audience and a professional readership from the fields of Latin studies, early modern history, and the history of ideas.
Brill's Classical Studies E-Books Online, Collection 2021 is the electronic version of the book publication program of Brill in the field of Classical Studies in 2021.

Coverage:
Ancient Philosophy, Ancient History, Ancient Religion, Greek and Roman Literature, Epigraphy & Papyrology, Archeology

This E-Book Collection is part of Brill's Classical Studies E-Books Online Collection.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.

For other pricing options, consortium arrangements and free 30-day trials contact us at sales-us@brill.com (the Americas) or sales-nl@brill.com (Europe, Middle East, Africa & Asia-Pacific).
The Language of Classical Literature is a peer-reviewed series of studies on Greek and Latin language and literature that are informed by modern literary or linguistic theory (e.g. discourse linguistics, narratology, intertextuality, metapoetics). The series is open to monographs, edited volumes, and conference proceedings (provided they have a clear thematic coherence).