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In: Quaerendo

Abstract

Like many wealthy citizens in the Dutch Golden Age, the Amsterdam civil servant Jacob de Wilde collected coins, gems, and small sculptures from Antiquity. Much has already been written about these collections, but De Wilde’s book collection has been largely neglected. This article focuses on his library.

In: Quaerendo

Abstract

The article (developing a paper presented at 2010 SHARP international conference) investigates the ways grand Faust editions from the 1850s and 1870s make sense as equivocal cultural objects migrating within and beyond Germany. Scholars have focused on these imposing tomes to herald the play as expression of a nation-centred claim, with Faust as heroic myth. This interpretation relied on costly plates and external characteristics for principal evidence. This article instead draws attention to circulation, transformations and fuller readings of these items, combining first-hand research in many collections. On the one hand, it looks into the editorial versions as adjustable to different audiences and cultures, using editorial data, reception evidence, and image analysis. On the other, it shows how fuller readings of a tome, based on material, symbolic and archival evidence, tell two different stories. This study of a text’s print apparel and circulation, at odds with its significance as a national myth, has implications well beyond this singular work.

In: Quaerendo
Author: Cis van Heertum

Abstract

This article discusses the survival of Adriaen Koerbagh’s Bloemhof, a controversial work confidently claimed to be rare in bibliographies and in antiquarian booksellers’ catalogues. So far, more than 70 copies have been found worldwide, in libraries and in private collections. Contemporary annotations provide additional biographical information on Koerbagh’s arrest and imprisonment. The reception of Bloemhof in Dutch and—mainly—German bibliographies is also discussed in the article. An appendix with surviving copies has been added.

In: Quaerendo
In: Quaerendo
From the sixteenth through to the eighteenth century, printed disputations were the main academic output of universities. This genre is especially attractive as it deals with the most significant cultural and scientific innovations of the early modern period, such as the printing revolution and the development of new methods in philosophy, education and scholarly exchange via personal networks.
Until recently, academic disputations have attracted comparatively little scholarly attention. This volume provides for the first time a comprehensive study of the early modern disputation culture, both through theoretical discussions and overviews, and numerous case studies that analyze particular features of disputations in various European regions.
Author: Bernd Roling

Summary

With Olaus Rudbeck’s four volumed ‘Atlantica’ at the end of the 17th century the Swedish national ideology, the Gothicism, reached its climax. Almost all aspects of this ideology had also been ventilated at the universities. As a result before and after the Great Northern War in the Swedish Empire university disputations formed the most important medium to spread and debate key aspects of the national mythology, like the exorbitant age of the runic alphabet, the Futhark, and the Edda and its proclaimed proto-christian content. Disputations and university speeches on a primordial Old Norse tradition were held in all parts of the Swedish Empire, even in its German areas like Stade or Greifswald. While some scholars like Petrus Lagerlöf e.g. tried to demonstrate the basic character of Old Norse traditions towards all other cultures, or made attempts like the more sceptical Sven Lagerbring to deduce the concept of Trinity or the christian theology of Creation from the Edda, other scholars like Gustav Bonde even connected Old Norse mythology with hermetic or cabalistic philosophy. As the article is going to demonstrate, by using academical disputations all around the Baltic Sea as a distributive instrument, Swedish scholars were able to demonstrate their loyalty towards the Empire and to identify themselves with its special claims. As it comes clear, too, the great defeat of Charles XII and the loss of almost the third part of its dominion were not able to stop this patriotic movement at the universities.

In: Early Modern Disputations and Dissertations in an Interdisciplinary and European Context

Summary

The university of Duisburg was very prolific in the first fifty years after its foundation in 1655. Within a few years, it established itself as one of the early centres of Cartesianism in Germany. As at other early modern universities, disputation theses were routinely written and published in Duisburg. However, this should not hide the fact that all works had to prove the author’s entitlement to publish such theses and the respondent’s entitlement to defend them in the subsequent disputation. As a result, printed disputations or dissertations did not only try to unfold a certain position argumentatively. In addition, the authors strategically staged the personal, social and discursive prerequisites of their actions. Their goal was to defend their entitlement to dispute against all possible criticism.

In: Early Modern Disputations and Dissertations in an Interdisciplinary and European Context