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Vergeltung für die Schoa: Abba Kovners Organisation Nakam. Aus dem Hebräischen übersetzt von Helene Seidler. Mit einem Geleitwort von Michael Brenner und einem Nachwort von Armin Lange
Author: Dina Porat
Translator: Helene Seidler
Dina Porat präsentiert erstmals umfassend die Geschichte von 50 jungen Frauen und Männern, die als Untergrundkämpfer in Osteuropa die Schoa überlebten und nach dem Krieg beschlossen, sechs Millionen Deutsche zu töten.

Angeführt von dem bewunderten Dichter und Partisanen Abba Kovner, wollten sie sich an der Nation rächen, die sie für die Ermordung von sechs Millionen Juden verantwortlich machten. Die Welt sollte sehen, dass jüdisches Blut nicht ungestraft vergossen werden dürfe. Auf Grundlage einer Fülle von Zeugenaussagen und von Quellen, die bisher in Archiven, in Broschüren oder in den Häusern der ehemaligen Mitglieder der Nakam-Gruppe verborgen lagen, wird das Geschehen in vielen erstaunlichen Einzelheiten ans Licht der Öffentlichkeit gebracht. Eingeflochten in die packende Erzählung sind die vom Rachethema unvermeidlich aufgeworfenen moralischen Fragen.

„Das Buch beschäftigt sich mit einem der aufregendsten, kompliziertesten und verzweifeltsten Kapitel, das die Schoa und ihre Schatten der israelischen Gesellschaft bis heute auferlegt haben. Eine wissenschaftliche Meisterleistung, spannend und originell erzählt, die mit vielen neuen Erkenntnissen aufwartet.“ - Prof. Tuvia Frilig, Ben-Gurion-Universität des Negev
From Europe and America to the Middle East, North Africa and other non-European Jewish settlement areas, the Encyclopedia of Jewish History and Culture covers the recent history of the Jewish people from 1750 through the 1950s. Originally published in German as the Enzyklopädie jüdischer Geschichte und Kultur by J.B. Metzler Verlag (Stuttgart/Weimar) in 2011 the work includes approximately 800 entries that present the state of international research and reveal a complex portrait of Jewish life - illuminated by many maps and illustrations. Central themes convey information on topics such as autonomy, exile, emancipation, literature, liturgy, music, and science of Judaism. The encyclopedia provides knowledge in an overall context and offers academics and other interested readers new insights into Jewish history and culture. The work is an outstanding contribution to the understanding of Judaism and modernity.

The first volume of the English edition will appear in 2017 with subsequent volumes following in due course. The volumes may be purchased individually as they appear or as a set once all 7 are available. Both the German and the English editions will also be available online.
Author: Herman Simissen
This study – the first full-length monograph in English on the subject – discusses the genesis of Theodor Lessing’s philosophy of history as mainly expressed in his books Geschichte als Sinngebung des Sinnlosen (1919 and 1927), as well as its philosophical implications. Lessing on the one hand vehemently denies that historians can know the past as it actually happened. On the other hand, and rather surprisingly, he emphasizes the exceptional importance of history within a culture, because of what he calls its religious function. His penetrating analysis of history is remarkably relevant for ongoing debates on the very nature of history.
Volume Editors: Susana Zapke and Elisabeth Gruber
This volume offers a comprehensive introduction to the major political, social, economic, and cultural developments in Vienna from c. 1100 to c. 1500. It provides a multidisciplinary view of the complexity of the vibrant city on the Danube. The volume is divided into four sections: Vienna, the city and urban design, politics, economy and sovereignty, social groups and communities, and spaces of knowledge, arts, and performance. An international team of eighteen scholars examines issues ranging from the city’s urban environment and art history, to economic and social concerns, using a range of sources and reflecting the wide array of possible approaches to the study of medieval Vienna today.

Contributors are: Peter Csendes, Ulrike Denk, Thomas Ertl, Christian Gastgeber, Thomas Haffner, Martha Keil, Franz Kirchweger, Heike Krause, Christina Lutter, Paul Mitchell, Kurt Mühlberger, Zoë Opačić, Ferdinand Opll, Barbara Schedl, Christoph Sonnlechner, and Peter Wright.
Baghdadi Jewish Networks in the Age of Nationalism traces the participation of Baghdadi Jews in Jewish transnational networks from the mid-nineteenth century until the mass exodus of Jews from Iraq between 1948 and 1951. Each chapter explores different components of how Jews in Iraq participated in global Jewish civil society through the modernization of communal leadership, Baghdadi satellite communities, transnational Jewish philanthropy and secular Jewish education. The final chapter presents three case studies that demonstrate the interconnectivity between different iterations of transnational Jewish networks. This work significantly expands our understanding of modern Iraqi Jewish society by going beyond its engagement with Arab/Iraqi nationalism or Zionism/anti-Zionism to explore Baghdadi participation within Jewish transnational networks.
Conference Proceedings of the Institute of Jewish Studies, University College London
The IJS Studies in Judaica series is primarily devoted to the publication of annual conferences of the Institute of Jewish Studies, University College London, although individual monographs are also welcome on any aspect of Jewish Studies and related disciplines. The volumes bring together, often for the first time, eminent scholars from different countries working in historical, literary, and linguistic research areas relevant to all periods of Jewish Studies, from antiquity to modernity. Examples of themes include biblical studies (within the ancient world), medieval Hebrew science, and history of Zionism, with the aim being to cover the latest trends in cutting-edge research in Jewish Studies in its broadest context.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
Editor: Alexander Kulik
The series is uniquely devoted to Judeo-Slavic studies. It covers all aspects of the history and culture of Jews in the Slavic world and the encounter between Jewish and Slavic cultures (including language, literature, and arts) from the Middle Ages to the present day. The series aims to provide a forum for the growing interest and research in the field across disciplines. It welcomes monographs, collected volumes, and editions of primary sources.

Submission Information:
Proposals may be submitted to Alexander Kulik ( akulik@mscc.huji.ac.il) and should include a brief (up to one page) description including the following items: author(s)/editor(s) names with addresses and affiliations; tentative title; topic; scope; significance; research method; innovation; relation to/difference from similar publications; target audience; date of submission; and provisional table of contents (optional).

The series published an average of one volume per year for the last 5 years.
Editor: Kevin Ingram
Converso and Morisco are the terms applied to those Jews and Muslims who converted to Christianity in large numbers and usually under duress in late Medieval Spain. The Converso and Morisco Studies series examines the implications of these mass conversions for the converts themselves, for their heirs (also referred to as Conversos and Moriscos) and for Medieval and Modern Spanish culture. As the essays in this collection attest, the study of the Converso and Morisco phenomena is not only important for those scholars focusing on Spanish society and culture, but for all academics interested in questions of identity, Otherness, nationalism, religious intolerance and the challenges of modernity.

Contributors: Luis F. Bernabé Pons, Michel Boeglin, Stephanie M. Cavanaugh, William P. Childers, Carlos Gilly, Kevin Ingram, Nicola Jennings, Patrick J. O’Banion, Francisco Javier Perea Siller, Mohamed Saadan, and Enrique Soria Mesa.
A Companion to Religious Minorities in Early Modern Rome investigates the lives and stories of the many groups and individuals in Rome, between 1500 and approximately 1750, who were not Roman (Latin) Catholic. It shows how early modern Catholic people and institutions in Rome were directly influenced by their interactions with other religious traditions. This collection reveals the significant impact of Protestants, Muslims, Jews, and Eastern Rite Christians; the influence of the many transient groups and individual travelers who passed through the city; the unique contributions of converts to Catholicism, who drew on the religion of their birth; and the importance of intermediaries, fluent in more than one culture and religion.

Contributors include: Olivia Adankpo-Labadie, Robert John Clines, Matthew Coneys Wainwright, Serena Di Nepi, Irene Fosi, Mayu Fujikawa, Sam Kennerley, Emily Michelson, James Nelson Novoa, Cesare Santus, Piet van Boxel, and Justine A. Walden.
Toward a Social History of the Jewish Community in 16th-Century Rome