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In this book Elizabeth Walgenbach argues that outlawry in medieval Iceland was a punishment shaped by the conventions of excommunication as it developed in the medieval Church. Excommunication and outlawry resemble one another, often closely, in a range of Icelandic texts, including lawcodes and narrative sources such as the contemporary sagas. This is not a chance resemblance but a by-product of the way the law was formed and written. Canon law helped to shape the outlines of secular justice.
The book is organized into chapters on excommunication, outlawry, outlawry as secular excommunication, and two case studies—one focused on the conflicts surrounding Bishop Guðmundr Arason and another focused on the outlaw Aron Hjǫrleifsson.
Author: Jakub Wysmułek
This volume offers the first comprehensive analysis of wills in late medieval Krakow. It presents the origins of testamentary acts in the Kingdom of Poland and its centre, Krakow, and their subsequent transformation from so called ‘canonical wills’ to ‘communal wills’. Wysmułek discusses the socio-cultural role of wills and sets them in their contemporary legal, social, and economic context. In doing so, he uncovers their influence on property ownership and family relations in the city, as well as on the religious practices of the burghers. Ultimately, this work seeks to change the perception of wills by treating the testamentary act itself as an important agent of historical social change – a ‘tool of power’.
Author: Jens Iverson
In Jus Post Bellum, Jens Iverson provides the Just War foundations of the concept, reveals the function of jus post bellum, and integrates the law that governs the transition from armed conflict to peace. This volume traces the history of jus post bellum avant la letter, tracing important writings on the transition to peace from Augustine, Aquinas, and Kant to more modern jurists and scholars. It explores definitional aspects of jus post bellum, including current its relationship to sister terms and related fields. It also critically evaluates the current state and possibilities for future development of the law and normative principles that apply to the transition to peace. Peacebuilders, scholars, and diplomats will find this book a crucial resource.
Volume Editors: Raphael Schäfer and Anne Peters
What are the implications of writing the history of legal issues? Eighteen authors from different legal systems and backgrounds offer different answers, by examining the history writing on issues ranging from slavery over the use of force to extraterritorial jurisdiction. Contributions show how historiography has often distorted or neglected regional cultures and suggest alternative methods and approaches to history writing. These studies are highly relevant for current international relations in which the fight over master narratives is especially fierce among governments, in different academic fields, and also between governments and academics.

Contributors are: Jean d'Aspremont, Julia Bühner, Emiliano J.Buis, Maria Adele Carrai, Jacob Katz Cogan, Ríán Derrig, Angelo Dube, Michel Erpelding, Etienne Henry, Madeleine Herren, Randall Lesaffer, Anne-Charlotte Martineau, Parvathi Menon, Momchil Milanov, Hirofumi Oguri, Gustavo Prieto, Hendrik Simon, Sebastian Spitra, and Deborah Whitehall.
Latin and German Documents from Heinricus Institoris’s Witch Hunts in Ravensburg and Innsbruck
This is the companion volume to the author's “An Unusual Inquisition”: Translated Documents from Heinricus Institoris’s Witch Hunts in Ravensburg and Innsbruck (Brill, 2020), and contains a full edition of the Latin and German documents illustrating Heinricus Institoris's activities as prosecutor of witchcraft in Ravensburg in 1484 and Innsbruck in 1485. These events had a great influence on Institoris's composition of the Malleus Maleficarum, the most famous and influential early-modern textbook on witchcraft. This is the only full and complete edition of these documents, some of which have not previously been published in their entirety, and the texts greatly illuminate the historical setting of the composition of one of history's most notorious books.
This volume explores familial wealth arrangements and gendered property from the fourteenth to the nineteenth centuries in Italian, German and Austrian territories (including Florence, Trento, Tyrol, and Vienna), Nordic countries, Western Pyrenees, and England. Family property as capital in the form of houses, land, movables, financial assets, and rights were of great importance in the past. Arrangements of such property were characterised by a high degree of negotiating competence but likewise they entailed competition between the parties involved and were highly conflict prone. Fifteen contributors from Austria, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, and the UK address different marital property regimes in relation to the practices and legal regulations of inheritance patterns with consideration to inter-familial negotiation, conflict, and resolution.

Contributors are: Marie-Pierre Arrizabalaga, Laura Casella, Isabelle Chabot, Siglinde Clementi, Simona Feci, Ellinor Forster, Andrea Griesebner, Christian Hagen, Margareth Lanzinger, Janine Maegraith, Silvia Mattivi, Beatrice Moring, Craig Muldrew, Regina Schäfer, and Georg Tschannett.
Author: Dante Fedele
Dante Fedele’s new work of reference reveals the medieval foundations of international law through a comprehensive study of a key figure of late medieval legal scholarship: Baldus de Ubaldis (1327-1400). A student of Bartolus de Sassoferrato, Baldus wrote both extensive commentaries on Roman, canon and feudal law and thousands of consilia originating from particular cases. His writings dealt with numerous issues related to sovereignty, territorial jurisdiction, diplomacy and war, combining a rich conspectus of earlier scholarship with highly creative ideas that exercised a profound influence on later juristic thought. The detailed picture of the international law doctrines elaborated by a prominent medieval jurist offered in this study contributes to our understanding of the intellectual archaeology of international law.

"Dr. Fedele’s monograph will no doubt become a necessary work of reference for any scholar interested in the history of international law. [...] Beyond the specific doctrines on particular areas of international law, Dr. Fedele’s study of Baldus shows how in the area of international governance, jurists sought to marshal different expressions of normativity." - Alain Wijffels, Foreword